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I am very nice to C lang and have been working on a project that I've been stuck on. Here is my code below

#include <stdio.h>

typedef struct{
int age;
int zipcode;
} person;

int main()
{
int age = 45;
int zipcode = 45035;
person person_1 = {.age = age, .zipcode = zipcode};

age = 89;
zipcode = 20941;
person person_2 = {.age = age, .zipcode = zipcode};

age = 41;
zipcode = 39290;
person person_3 = {.age = age, .zipcode = zipcode};

age = 50;
zipcode = 92749;
person person_4 = {.age = age, .zipcode = zipcode};


age = 13;
zipcode = 78500;
person person_5 = {.age = age, .zipcode = zipcode};

person* y[5] = {&person_1, &person_2, &person_3, &person_4, &person_5};


int* pt = &y;
printf("this is addr %d\n", y);
printf("this is pt %d\n", *pt);
for(int i =0; i < 5; i++)
{
    person current = pt;
    printf("%d\n", current.age);
    printf("%d\n", current.zipcode);

    pt+=1;
}

}

I would like to do some things with the pointer variable pt. I am trying to have access to the memory location of first item in my struct arr so that I can move through the array and display everything in it. I understand it might be simpler to not use pointers in this instance but I will be using this code across files so I figured it would make the process easier down the road.

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Mohamed is a new contributor to this site. Take care in asking for clarification, commenting, and answering. Check out our Code of Conduct.
  • Welcome to Stack Overflow. Do you know how to iterate through an array of a primitive type like int? – Beta May 23 at 21:55
  • 1
    Tip: If you use capitalized words for types such as Person, you can define names with sensible names more easily (e.g. Person person) – ikegami May 23 at 22:04
  • @Beta yes I do and ikegami, thank you for the tip, I will keep in mind next time I create a struct – Mohamed May 23 at 22:42
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Here are some updates that might get you closer to what you're looking for:

  person *pt = y[0];
  printf ("this is addr %p\n", y[0]);
  printf ("this is pt %p\n", pt);
  for (int i = 0; i < 5; i++)
    {
      person current = *pt;
      printf ("%d\n", current.age);
      printf ("%d\n", current.zipcode);

      pt += 1;
    }
| improve this answer | |
0

If you're asking how to iterate over the fields of a struct, you can't do that. But since

If you're asking how to iterate over the elements of the array you have created, read on.


If you have an array

type array[...];

You can get a pointer to the first element using

type *p = array;

This is equivalent to

type *p = &( array[0] );

You have an array of pointers to structs, so you are asking for a pointer to a pointer.

person *array[5] = { &person_1, &person_2, &person_3, &person_4, &person_5 };

for (person **p=array, int i=0; i<5; ++pt, ++i) {
    printf("%d\n", (*p)->age);
    printf("%d\n", (*p)->zipcode);
}

If you had an array of structs, you'd have a pointer to a struct.

person array[5] = {
   { .age = 45, .zipcode = 45035 },
   ...
};

for (person *p=array, int i=0; i<5; ++pt, ++i) {
    printf("%d\n", p->age);
    printf("%d\n", p->zipcode);
}
| improve this answer | |
0

First of all, be very careful. If person ever has a member which is a different size from int, the struct may be "padded" with empty bytes, and this padding may be different depending on the order of the members within the struct.

If you are very sure that this struct will never change, you can declare an int* to the beginning of your struct array and access individual members using pointer I.E.:

person peopleArray[40];
int *atribPtr = (int*)peopleArray;
for(int i=0; i < sizeof(peopleArray); i++){
    doAgeStuff(atribPtr[2*i]);
    doZipStuff(atribPtr[2*i + 1]);
}

You could refactor this to remove the multiplications, but your compiler will probably do that for you anyways.

Once again I want to reiterate that you should be extremely careful with this. You should probably just iterate over the list of structs the normal way, and use the . operator. Code will be much easier to understand, and much safer.

| improve this answer | |
New contributor
Trevor Galivan is a new contributor to this site. Take care in asking for clarification, commenting, and answering. Check out our Code of Conduct.
0

You really [probably] don't want the extra level of indirection. It will scale better if you keep it simple

You can't iterate with int *pt. It won't even compile because you're using an int pointer to interate over an array of person pointers [i.e. extra indirection].

Here's a simplified version. As a twist, I've added an "end of table" sentinel (e.g. an entry with a zipcode value of zero):

#include <stdio.h>

typedef struct {
    int age;
    int zipcode;
} person;

person persons[] = {
    { .age = 45, .zipcode = 45035 },
    { .age = 89, .zipcode = 20941 },
    { .age = 41, .zipcode = 39290 },
    { .age = 50, .zipcode = 92749 },
    { .age = 13, .zipcode = 78500 },

    { .age = -1, .zipcode = 0 },
};

int
main()
{
    person *current;

    for (current = persons;  current->zipcode != 0;  ++current) {
        printf("\n");
        printf("%d\n", current->age);
        printf("%d\n", current->zipcode);
    }

    return 0;
}

UPDATE:

Hi Craig, how would I go about adding to my struct array as I go instead of knowing ahead of time, like you've done?

Although, we could use the sentinel approach, for this, it's better to maintain a count of the number of entries and use realloc to enlarge the list.

We have to change the persons global to a pointer. And, the print loop has to change.

Here's a simple version:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

typedef struct {
    int age;
    int zipcode;
} person;

int person_count;
person *persons;

person *
addperson(int age,int zipcode)
{
    person *current;

    ++person_count;

    persons = realloc(persons,sizeof(*persons) * person_count);
    current = &persons[person_count - 1];

    current->age = age;
    current->zipcode = zipcode;

    return current;
}

int
main(void)
{
    person *current;

    addperson(45,45035);
    addperson(89,20941);
    addperson(41,39290);
    addperson(50,92749);
    addperson(13,78500);
    // more ... (by any means you want)

    for (current = persons;  current < &persons[person_count];  ++current) {
        printf("\n");
        printf("%d\n", current->age);
        printf("%d\n", current->zipcode);
    }

    return 0;
}

The above is doing a realloc for each addperson call. malloc/realloc can be somewhat expensive.

There is an enhancement to use a second count variable that keeps track of the "allocated" size vs. the number of "in use" items. This allows us to reduce the number of realloc calls:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

typedef struct {
    int age;
    int zipcode;
} person;

int person_count;
int person_max;
person *persons;

person *
addperson(int age,int zipcode)
{
    person *current;

    if (person_count >= person_max) {
        person_max += 100;
        persons = realloc(persons,sizeof(*persons) * person_max);
    }

    current = &persons[person_count++];

    current->age = age;
    current->zipcode = zipcode;

    return current;
}

int
main(void)
{
    person *current;

    addperson(45,45035);
    addperson(89,20941);
    addperson(41,39290);
    addperson(50,92749);
    addperson(13,78500);
    // more ... (by any means you want)

    // trim the array to the exact amount we actually needed
    person_max = person_count;
    persons = realloc(persons,sizeof(*persons) * person_max);

    for (current = persons;  current < &persons[person_count];  ++current) {
        printf("\n");
        printf("%d\n", current->age);
        printf("%d\n", current->zipcode);
    }

    return 0;
}
| improve this answer | |
  • Hi Craig, how would I go about adding to my struct array as I go instead of knowing ahead of time, like you've done? – Mohamed May 23 at 22:43

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