-1
guest_list = [('Ken', 30, "Chef"), ("Pat", 35, 'Lawyer'), ('Amanda', 25, "Engineer")]

for guests in guest_list:          #guests is a tuple
    for x in range(0, len(guests)):
        res = "{} is {} years old and works as {}.".format(guests[x], guests[x+1], guests[x+2])
        print(res)
    guests += 1

I am trying to format elements of each tuple as "Ken is 30 years old and works as Chef". But in the output, I am getting it done only for the first tuple (instead of all of them). I am not able to pinpoint the exact the spot where I am going wrong.

2
  • 1
    Remove the second loop and guests += 1, change all x to 0.
    – Austin
    May 24 '20 at 6:48
  • Just remove for loop, you don't need it.
    – Roaa
    Mar 10 at 7:21
2

This would be the most compact solution. You unpack the tuple directly at the iteration and use an f-string to format it directly:

for name, age, job in guest_list: 
    print(f"{name} is {age} years old and works as {job}.")
1

This will do --

    def guest_list(guests):
        for name, age, role in guests:
            print("{name} is {age} years old and works as {role}".format(name = name, age = str(age), role = role))

However, the following code (although obviously redundant) gives me more of a "visual (in my head) representation" of what I'm trying to accomplish, before removing some extra lines that Python can take care of you

    def guest_list(guests):
        i = 0
        for name, age, role in guests:
            name, age, role = guests[i]
            i += 1
            print("{name} is {a`enter code here`ge} years old and works as {role}".format(name = name, age = str(age), role = role))
1
  • 1.) Python version 3.8 is already out there. Consider using f-strings. 2.) Your obviously redundant code may be irritating and is, ahem, obviously redundant. Apart from that, good first answer :) Sep 9 '20 at 17:08
1
def guest_list(guests):
    for guest in guests:
        name, age, role = guest
        print("{} is {} years old and works as {}".format(name,str(age),role))

guest_list([('Ken', 30, "Chef"), ("Pat", 35, 'Lawyer'), ('Amanda', 25, "Engineer")])

#Click Run to submit code
"""
Output should match:
Ken is 30 years old and works as Chef
Pat is 35 years old and works as Lawyer
Amanda is 25 years old and works as Engineer
"""
0

No need to have a nested loop. Just do this:

guest_list = [('Ken', 30, "Chef"), ("Pat", 35, 'Lawyer'), ('Amanda', 25, "Engineer")]

for guests in guest_list:          #guests is a tuple
    res = "{} is {} years old and works as {}.".format(guests[0], guests[1], guests[2])
    print(res)

Result:

Ken is 30 years old and works as Chef.
Pat is 35 years old and works as Lawyer.
Amanda is 25 years old and works as Engineer.
0

using tuple unpacking.

guest_list = [('Ken', 30, "Chef"), ("Pat", 35, 'Lawyer'), ('Amanda', 25, "Engineer")]

for guests in guest_list:      
    # tuple unpacking..
    res = "{} is {} years old and works as {}.".format(*guests)
    print(res)
1
  • 1
    It's much clearer to unpack into named variables as part of the for loop.
    – a'r
    May 24 '20 at 6:52
0

You don't need the inner loop at all! guest_list is a list of tuples and guests is a tuple as you have clearly mentioned, your last line increments guests by 1. You cannot increment a tuple by 1.The inner loop will first have the value of x as 0, then it will format guests[x], guests[x+1], guests[x+2] as guests[0], guests[1], guests[3]. But in the second iteration, x will have a value of 1, then x+1, x+2 will be 3 and 4 and guests[4] does not exist.

You need something like this:

guest_list = [('Ken', 30, "Chef"), ("Pat", 35, 'Lawyer'), ('Amanda', 25, "Engineer")]

for guests in guest_list:         
    res = "{} is {} years old and works as {}.".format(guests[0], guests[1], guests[2])
    print(res)

You can also use f-strings like this:

for guests in guest_list:
    res = f"{guests[0]} is {guests[1]} years old and works as {guests[2]}.")
    print(res)

Another approach would be to use a list comprehension, you'll end up with a list of results.

res = [f"{guests[0]} is {guests[1]} years old and works as {guests[2]}.") for guests in guest_list]
map(print, res)

The map() function applies the print function to each element in the list.

0

You have some extraneous code but additionally, you'd benefit from using fstrings. Together, they'd make your code much more readable.

guest_list = [('Ken', 30, "Chef"), ("Pat", 35, 'Lawyer'), ('Amanda', 25, "Engineer")]

for guest in guest_list:
    print(f"{guest[0]} is {guest[1]} years old and works as {guest[2]}.")
Ken is 30 years old and works as Chef.
Pat is 35 years old and works as Lawyer.
Amanda is 25 years old and works as Engineer.
0
def guest_list(guests):
    for name, age, job in guests:
        
        print("{} is {} years old and works as {}".format(name,age,job))

guest_list([('Ken', 30, "Chef"), ("Pat", 35, 'Lawyer'), ('Amanda', 25, "Engineer")])

#Click Run to submit code
"""
Output should match:
Ken is 30 years old and works as Chef
Pat is 35 years old and works as Lawyer
Amanda is 25 years old and works as Engineer
"""
1
  • Code only answers are not encouraged. Please try to explain how you got to this solution. Apr 24 at 15:14
-1

This solution unpacks the list.

def guest_list(guests): 
    for guests in guests:
        name,age,job=guests
        res = "{} is {} years old and works as {}.".format(name, age, job) 
        print(res)
0

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