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I am using debian linux. I have a linux machine on which mysql is install. I can log in to my linux machine using root user as well as other user. I can connect to mysql database on linux machine from windows machine using sqlyog. Now I want to execute queries on linux machine only using linux terminal

I tried some following things on terminal

I went to root directory then I went to /var/lib directory

I run following commands on terminal

mysqladmin -u root -p
mysqladmin -u root -ppassword

everytime I have get following error message

ERROR 1045 (28000) Access denied for user 'root'@'localhost' (Using password NO)

please guide me for following

  1. How do I get mysql prompt in linux terminal?
  2. How I stop the mysql server from linux terminal?
  3. How I start the mysql server from linux terminal?
  4. How do I get mysql prompt in linux terminal?
  5. How do I login to mysql server from linux terminal?
  6. How do I solve following error?

ERROR 1045 (28000) Access denied for user 'root'@'localhost' (Using password NO)

Please give me solutions for above question. Thank You

  • Whenever I run this command mysql -u root -p it doesn't ask me password and I get error message "ERROR 1045 (28000) Access denied for user 'root'@'localhost' (Using password NO)" Another question is where do I run above command root prompt in root folder or do need to go to a specific directory. give me its path. thank you! – Param-Ganak Jun 1 '11 at 11:33
  • Try changing up the syntax for your command, like so: "mysql --user=root --password" (remove the quotes when you type it on the commandline). Otherwise, it seems pretty odd that you are not getting prompted for a password and I suspect there might be something else going on outside of mysql's scope. – baraboom Jun 1 '11 at 12:00

11 Answers 11

170

1.- How do I get mysql prompt in linux terminal?

mysql -u root -p

At the Enter password: prompt, well, enter root's password :)

You can find further reference by typing mysql --help or at the online manual.

2. How I stop the mysql server from linux terminal?

It depends. Red Hat based distros have the service command:

service mysqld stop

Other distros require to call the init script directly:

/etc/init.d/mysqld stop

3. How I start the mysql server from linux terminal?

Same as #2, but with start.

4. How do I get mysql prompt in linux terminal?

Same as #1.

5. How do I login to mysql server from linux terminal?

Same as #1.

6. How do I solve following error?

Same as #1.

  • Thanks, mate. This worked fine for me. Cheers. – Felipe May 2 '16 at 20:14
9

To your first question:

mysql -u root -p

or

mysqladmin -u root -p "your_command"

depending on what you want to do. The password will be asked of you once you hit enter! I'm guessing you really want to use mysql and not mysqladmin.

For restarting or stopping the MySQL-server on linux, it depends on your installation, but in the common debian derivatives this will work for starting, stopping and restarting the service:

sudo /etc/init.d/mysql start
sudo /etc/init.d/mysql stop
sudo /etc/init.d/mysql restart
sudo /etc/init.d/mysql status

In some newer distros this might work as well if MySQL is set up as a deamon/service.

sudo service mysql start
sudo service mysql stop
sudo service mysql restart
sudo service mysql status

But the question is really impossible to answer without knowing your particular setup.

  • Whenever I run this command mysql -u root -p it doesn't ask me password and I get error message "ERROR 1045 (28000) Access denied for user 'root'@'localhost' (Using password NO)" another question is where do I run above command root prompt in root folder or do need to go to a specific directory give me its path thank you – Param-Ganak Jun 1 '11 at 11:27
  • You don't have to go to a specific directory. You can run it from anywhere. Could you paste the response to uname -a and mysql --version and paste them here (just enter them into the terminal). We could probably give you more help then. service mysql status would also be helpful. – flindeberg Jun 1 '11 at 11:46
5

I assume you are looking to use mysql client, which is a good thing and much more efficient to use than any phpMyAdmin alternatives.

The proper way to log in with the commandline client is by typing:

mysql -u username -p

Notice I did not type the password. Doing so would of made the password visible on screen, that is not good in multi-user environnment!

After typing this hit enter key, mysql will ask you for your password.

Once logged in, of course you will need:

use databaseName;

to do anything.

Good-luck.

  • Whenever I run this command mysql -u root -p it doesn't ask me password and I get error message "ERROR 1045 (28000) Access denied for user 'root'@'localhost' (Using password NO)" Another question is where do I run above command root prompt in root folder or do need to go to a specific directory. give me its path. thank you! – Param-Ganak Jun 1 '11 at 11:31
  • What linux distro are you running on? – stefgosselin Jun 1 '11 at 12:32
5

At the command prompt try:

mysql -u root -p

give the password when prompted.

  • Whenever I run this command mysql -u root -p it doesn't ask me password and I get error message "ERROR 1045 (28000) Access denied for user 'root'@'localhost' (Using password NO)" Another question is where do I run above command root prompt in root folder or do need to go to a specific directory. give me its path. thank you! – Param-Ganak Jun 1 '11 at 11:33
  • You should be able to run it from your home directory as long as you have the path configured. It should work... – quarkonium Jun 1 '11 at 11:54
4

I had the same exact issue on my ArchLinux VPS today.

mysql -u root -p just didn't work, whereas mysql -u root -pmypassword did.

It turned out I had a broken /dev/tty device file (most likely after a udev upgrade), so mysql couldn't use it for an interactive login.

I ended up removing /dev/tty and recreating it with mknod /dev/tty c 5 1 and chmod 666 /dev/tty. That solved the mysql problem and some other issues too.

  • This actually works! Now everyone can see the root password in the bash_history though. :/ How did you know they the /dev/tty was messed up? – user3870315 Jun 22 '16 at 21:29
2

To stop or start mysql on most linux systems the following should work:

/etc/init.d/mysqld stop

/etc/init.d/mysqld start

The other answers look good for accessing the mysql client from the command line.

Good luck!

2
  1. you should use mysql command. It's a command line client for mysql RDBMS, and comes with most mysql installations: http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.1/en/mysql.html

  2. To stop or start mysql database (you rarely should need doing that 'by hand'), use proper init script with stop or start parameter, usually /etc/init.d/mysql stop. This, however depends on your linux distribution. Some new distributions encourage service mysql start style.

  3. You're logging in by using mysql sql shell.

  4. The error comes probably because double '-p' parameter. You can provide -ppassword or just -p and you'll be asked for password interactively. Also note, that some instalations might use mysql (not root) user as an administrative user. Check your sqlyog configuration to obtain working connection parameters.

1

if u got still no access to db, 1. in ur error message is set no password right? then first do mysqlpasswd 'username' after that enter and then give it a password type again as requested and then try to access again with mysql -p if you are root

1

if you're already logged in as root just

mysql -u root

prompting the password will otherwise return as error

1

Try "sudo mysql -u root -p" please.

0

use this "mysql -uroot -pPassword"

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