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So I was trying to create a tic tac toe game and I ran into a problem with one of my method where I could not figure out why it was going on an infinite loop. My code is:

def player_input():
    marker = ''
    while marker != 'X' or marker != 'O':
        marker = input('Do you want to be X or O: ').upper()
        print(marker)

    if marker == 'X':
        return ['X','O']
    return ['O','X']

What it is currently doing is that it keeps asking the question even when the user inputs X or O. The code works when I use the condition:

while not (marker == 'X' or marker == 'O'):
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  • Try putting parentheses in that line: while (marker != 'X') or (marker != 'O'):
    – Eric Jin
    May 25, 2020 at 19:28
  • 1
    In your first while loop conditions, when marker = 'X' then it also doesn't equal 'O'. Conversely, when it is 'O' then it also doesn't equal 'X'. May 25, 2020 at 19:30
  • @EricJin or is a low-priority operation. It's a good reflex to check whether things behave differently with parenthesis but here it is equivalent.
    – Guimoute
    May 25, 2020 at 19:39
  • This is actually not a python question. It is clearly more about logics.
    – keepAlive
    May 25, 2020 at 20:31

2 Answers 2

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The problem is your logic in checking marker != 'X' or marker != 'O'.

Let's pretend marker == 'X'. So our expression evaluates to False or True which evaluates to True. Same goes with marker == 'O'. Our expression here evaluates to True or False which evaluates to True.

You should be using and, not or.

Your second expression, not (marker == 'X' or marker == 'O') is equivalent to (not marker == 'X') and (not marker == 'O'), so it works. (De Morgan's laws)

def player_input():
    marker = ''
    while marker != 'X' and marker != 'O': # change from 'or' to 'and'
        marker = input('Do you want to be X or O: ').upper()
        print(marker)

    if marker == 'X':
        return ['X','O']
    return ['O','X']
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  • 2
    Maybe it's a matter of preferences but I find while marker not in ("X", "O"): easier to read, especially when you start using way more than 2 options.
    – Guimoute
    May 25, 2020 at 19:41
  • Yeah. Usually I use a in ('choice 1', 'choice 2') over a == 'choice 1' or a == 'choice 2'
    – Eric Jin
    May 25, 2020 at 19:50
  • Additionally using not in and in opposed to a == '1' or a == '2' is slightly faster as well
    – Eric Jin
    May 27, 2020 at 0:51
2

The problem lies within while marker != 'X' or marker != 'O'.

What is happening in your first attempt is that even if marker != 'X' is False (marker is equal to 'X'), then marker != 'O' MUST be True. So it'll be always asking for input again, because it is "one or the other".

Suppose marker != 'X' is an expression A and marker != 'O' is an expression B. Then, according to DeMorgan's Laws you have:

(not (A and B)) is equivalent to ((not A) or (not B))

And:

(not (A or B)) is equivalent to ((not A) and (not B))

Therefore, your last attempt works as expected because:

while not (marker == 'X' or marker == 'O'):

Is equivalent to:

while (not marker == 'X') and (not marker == 'O'):

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