944

I have classes like these:

class MyDate
{
    int year, month, day;
}

class Lad
{
    string firstName;
    string lastName;
    MyDate dateOfBirth;
}

And I would like to turn a Lad object into a JSON string like this:

{
    "firstName":"Markoff",
    "lastName":"Chaney",
    "dateOfBirth":
    {
        "year":"1901",
        "month":"4",
        "day":"30"
    }
}

(without the formatting). I found this link, but it uses a namespace that's not in .NET 4. I also heard about JSON.NET, but their site seems to be down at the moment, and I'm not keen on using external DLL files.

Are there other options besides manually creating a JSON string writer?

  • 2
    JSON.net can be loaded here An other and faster (as they say - I did not test it myself) solution is ServiceStack.Text I would not recommend rolling your own JSON parser. It will likely be slower and more error prone or you have to invest lots of time. – Zebi Jun 1 '11 at 13:01
  • yes. C# has a type called JavaScriptSerializer – Glenn Ferrie Jun 1 '11 at 13:02
  • possible duplicate of Generics / JSON JavaScriptSerializer C# – Filip Ekberg Jun 1 '11 at 13:03
  • 2
    Hm.. as far as I can see you should be able to use: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/… Which is also in .Net 4.0 according to the MSDN page. You should be able to use the Serialize(Object obj) method: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb292287.aspx Am I missing something here? Btw. you link seems to be a some code and not a link – Holger Jun 1 '11 at 13:04
  • Not to mention it has no dependencies on the System.Web.Xyz namespaces... – Dave Jellison Mar 6 '13 at 18:58

14 Answers 14

899

You could use the JavaScriptSerializer class (add reference to System.Web.Extensions):

using System.Web.Script.Serialization;
var json = new JavaScriptSerializer().Serialize(obj);

A full example:

using System;
using System.Web.Script.Serialization;

public class MyDate
{
    public int year;
    public int month;
    public int day;
}

public class Lad
{
    public string firstName;
    public string lastName;
    public MyDate dateOfBirth;
}

class Program
{
    static void Main()
    {
        var obj = new Lad
        {
            firstName = "Markoff",
            lastName = "Chaney",
            dateOfBirth = new MyDate
            {
                year = 1901,
                month = 4,
                day = 30
            }
        };
        var json = new JavaScriptSerializer().Serialize(obj);
        Console.WriteLine(json);
    }
}
| improve this answer | |
1056

Since we all love one-liners

... this one depends on the Newtonsoft NuGet package, which is popular and better than the default serializer.

Newtonsoft.Json.JsonConvert.SerializeObject(new {foo = "bar"})

Documentation: Serializing and Deserializing JSON

| improve this answer | |
  • 134
    Newtonsoft serializer is way faster and mor customizable then built in. Highly recommend to use it. Thanks for the answer @willsteel – Andrei Oct 2 '13 at 13:04
  • 8
    @JosefPfleger the pricing is for JSON.NET Schema, not JSON.NET the regular serializer, which is MIT – David Cumps Jun 3 '15 at 19:51
  • 1
    My testing showed that Newtonsoft is slower than JavaScriptSerializer class. (.NET 4.5.2) – nemke Sep 28 '15 at 11:34
  • 31
    If you read the MSDN documentation for JavaScriptSerializer, it flat out says use JSON.net. – dsghi Nov 5 '15 at 6:10
  • 3
    @JosefPfleger Newtionsoft JSON.net is MIT licensed... you could make modifications and resell it it you wanted. Their pricing page is about commercial technical support, and some schema validator they have. – cb88 Aug 24 '16 at 15:28
95

Use Json.Net library, you can download it from Nuget Packet Manager.

Serializing to Json String:

 var obj = new Lad
        {
            firstName = "Markoff",
            lastName = "Chaney",
            dateOfBirth = new MyDate
            {
                year = 1901,
                month = 4,
                day = 30
            }
        };

var jsonString = Newtonsoft.Json.JsonConvert.SerializeObject(obj);

Deserializing to Object:

var obj = Newtonsoft.Json.JsonConvert.DeserializeObject<Lad>(jsonString );
| improve this answer | |
57

Use the DataContractJsonSerializer class: MSDN1, MSDN2.

My example: HERE.

It can also safely deserialize objects from a JSON string, unlike JavaScriptSerializer. But personally I still prefer Json.NET.

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Still don't see any examples on that page, but here are some on MSDN and elsewhere -> the last one uses extension methods to achieve one-liners. – Cristian Diaconescu Jan 17 '15 at 21:26
  • Oh, I missed the 2nd MSDN link :) – Cristian Diaconescu Jan 19 '15 at 8:48
  • 2
    It doesn't serialize plain classes. The error reported "Consider marking it with the DataContractAttribute attribute, and marking all of its members you want serialized with the DataMemberAttribute attribute. If the type is a collection, consider marking it with the CollectionDataContractAttribute." – Michael Freidgeim Jul 14 '16 at 2:56
  • @MichaelFreidgeim That's right, you have to mark properties in the class you want to serialize with attributes. DataContractAttribute DataMemberAttribute – Edgar Jul 15 '16 at 6:25
  • 1
    @MichaelFreidgeim Which is better depends on the requirements. The attributes let you configure how the property is serialized. – Edgar Jul 15 '16 at 13:49
24

You can achieve this by using Newtonsoft.json. Install Newtonsoft.json from NuGet. And then:

using Newtonsoft.Json;

var jsonString = JsonConvert.SerializeObject(obj);
| improve this answer | |
22

Wooou! Really better using a JSON framework :)

Here is my example using Json.NET (http://james.newtonking.com/json):

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Text;
using Newtonsoft.Json;
using System.IO;

namespace com.blogspot.jeanjmichel.jsontest.model
{
    public class Contact
    {
        private Int64 id;
        private String name;
        List<Address> addresses;

        public Int64 Id
        {
            set { this.id = value; }
            get { return this.id; }
        }

        public String Name
        {
            set { this.name = value; }
            get { return this.name; }
        }

        public List<Address> Addresses
        {
            set { this.addresses = value; }
            get { return this.addresses; }
        }

        public String ToJSONRepresentation()
        {
            StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
            JsonWriter jw = new JsonTextWriter(new StringWriter(sb));

            jw.Formatting = Formatting.Indented;
            jw.WriteStartObject();
            jw.WritePropertyName("id");
            jw.WriteValue(this.Id);
            jw.WritePropertyName("name");
            jw.WriteValue(this.Name);

            jw.WritePropertyName("addresses");
            jw.WriteStartArray();

            int i;
            i = 0;

            for (i = 0; i < addresses.Count; i++)
            {
                jw.WriteStartObject();
                jw.WritePropertyName("id");
                jw.WriteValue(addresses[i].Id);
                jw.WritePropertyName("streetAddress");
                jw.WriteValue(addresses[i].StreetAddress);
                jw.WritePropertyName("complement");
                jw.WriteValue(addresses[i].Complement);
                jw.WritePropertyName("city");
                jw.WriteValue(addresses[i].City);
                jw.WritePropertyName("province");
                jw.WriteValue(addresses[i].Province);
                jw.WritePropertyName("country");
                jw.WriteValue(addresses[i].Country);
                jw.WritePropertyName("postalCode");
                jw.WriteValue(addresses[i].PostalCode);
                jw.WriteEndObject();
            }

            jw.WriteEndArray();

            jw.WriteEndObject();

            return sb.ToString();
        }

        public Contact()
        {
        }

        public Contact(Int64 id, String personName, List<Address> addresses)
        {
            this.id = id;
            this.name = personName;
            this.addresses = addresses;
        }

        public Contact(String JSONRepresentation)
        {
            //To do
        }
    }
}

The test:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using com.blogspot.jeanjmichel.jsontest.model;

namespace com.blogspot.jeanjmichel.jsontest.main
{
    public class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            List<Address> addresses = new List<Address>();
            addresses.Add(new Address(1, "Rua Dr. Fernandes Coelho, 85", "15º andar", "São Paulo", "São Paulo", "Brazil", "05423040"));
            addresses.Add(new Address(2, "Avenida Senador Teotônio Vilela, 241", null, "São Paulo", "São Paulo", "Brazil", null));

            Contact contact = new Contact(1, "Ayrton Senna", addresses);

            Console.WriteLine(contact.ToJSONRepresentation());
            Console.ReadKey();
        }
    }
}

The result:

{
  "id": 1,
  "name": "Ayrton Senna",
  "addresses": [
    {
      "id": 1,
      "streetAddress": "Rua Dr. Fernandes Coelho, 85",
      "complement": "15º andar",
      "city": "São Paulo",
      "province": "São Paulo",
      "country": "Brazil",
      "postalCode": "05423040"
    },
    {
      "id": 2,
      "streetAddress": "Avenida Senador Teotônio Vilela, 241",
      "complement": null,
      "city": "São Paulo",
      "province": "São Paulo",
      "country": "Brazil",
      "postalCode": null
    }
  ]
}

Now I will implement the constructor method that will receives a JSON string and populates the class' fields.

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Good post, this is the most current way to do it. – MatthewD May 30 '16 at 13:33
20

A new JSON serializer is available in the System.Text.Json namespace. It's included in the .NET Core 3.0 shared framework and is in a NuGet package for projects that target .NET Standard or .NET Framework or .NET Core 2.x.

Example code:

using System;
using System.Text.Json;

public class MyDate
{
    public int year { get; set; }
    public int month { get; set; }
    public int day { get; set; }
}

public class Lad
{
    public string FirstName { get; set; }
    public string LastName { get; set; }
    public MyDate DateOfBirth { get; set; }
}

class Program
{
    static void Main()
    {
        var lad = new Lad
        {
            FirstName = "Markoff",
            LastName = "Chaney",
            DateOfBirth = new MyDate
            {
                year = 1901,
                month = 4,
                day = 30
            }
        };
        var json = JsonSerializer.Serialize(lad);
        Console.WriteLine(json);
    }
}

In this example the classes to be serialized have properties rather than fields; the System.Text.Json serializer currently doesn't serialize fields.

Documentation:

| improve this answer | |
9

If they are not very big, what's probably your case export it as JSON.

Also this makes it portable among all platforms.

using Newtonsoft.Json;

[TestMethod]
public void ExportJson()
{
    double[,] b = new double[,]
        {
            { 110,  120,  130,  140, 150 },
            {1110, 1120, 1130, 1140, 1150},
            {1000,    1,   5,     9, 1000},
            {1110,    2,   6,    10, 1110},
            {1220,    3,   7,    11, 1220},
            {1330,    4,   8,    12, 1330}
        };

    string jsonStr = JsonConvert.SerializeObject(b);

    Console.WriteLine(jsonStr);

    string path = "X:\\Programming\\workspaceEclipse\\PyTutorials\\src\\tensorflow_tutorials\\export.txt";

    File.WriteAllText(path, jsonStr);
}
| improve this answer | |
8

If you are in an ASP.NET MVC web controller it's as simple as:

string ladAsJson = Json(Lad);

Can't believe no one has mentioned this.

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    I get an error about not being able to cast jsonresult to string. – csga5000 Sep 23 '16 at 5:30
  • It will compile with implicit typing: var ladAsJson = Json(Lad). – ewomack Nov 7 '16 at 19:55
3

I would vote for ServiceStack's JSON Serializer:

using ServiceStack.Text

string jsonString = new { FirstName = "James" }.ToJson();

It is also the fastest JSON serializer available for .NET: http://www.servicestack.net/benchmarks/

| improve this answer | |
  • 4
    Those are very old benchmarks there. I've just test all three current versions of Newtonsoft, ServiceStack and JavaScriptSerializer and currently Newtonsoft is the fastest. Tho they all do quite fast. – Michael Logutov Oct 25 '13 at 9:22
  • 1
    ServiceStack doesn't appear to be free. – joelnet Dec 19 '13 at 0:25
  • @joelnet this is now the case, but was free when answering the question. However it is free for small sites, and I am still using it even though it is paid, it is a superb framework. – James Dec 19 '13 at 10:21
  • Some benchmarks here, though there's non for the serialization on its own: docs.servicestack.net/real-world-performance – JohnLBevan Dec 13 '18 at 9:39
3

Use the below code for converting XML to JSON.

var json = new JavaScriptSerializer().Serialize(obj);
| improve this answer | |
3

Use these tools for generating a C# class, and then use this code to serialize your object:

 var json = new JavaScriptSerializer().Serialize(obj);
| improve this answer | |
3

It is as easy as this (it works for dynamic objects as well (type object)):

string json = new
System.Web.Script.Serialization.JavaScriptSerializer().Serialize(MYOBJECT);
| improve this answer | |
  • there is no default script under web. :( – M at Jul 11 '16 at 7:17
  • You are looking for this:msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/… – MarzSocks Jul 11 '16 at 19:08
  • I kind of tried that but no. Script I guess I should add it as reference. So thanks a lot – M at Jul 12 '16 at 3:43
0

Serializer

 public static void WriteToJsonFile<T>(string filePath, T objectToWrite, bool append = false) where T : new()
{
        var contentsToWriteToFile = JsonConvert.SerializeObject(objectToWrite, new JsonSerializerSettings
        {
            Formatting = Formatting.Indented,
        });
        using (var writer = new StreamWriter(filePath, append))
        {
            writer.Write(contentsToWriteToFile);
        }
}

Object

namespace MyConfig
{
    public class AppConfigurationSettings
    {
        public AppConfigurationSettings()
        {
            /* initialize the object if you want to output a new document
             * for use as a template or default settings possibly when 
             * an app is started.
             */
            if (AppSettings == null) { AppSettings=new AppSettings();}
        }

        public AppSettings AppSettings { get; set; }
    }

    public class AppSettings
    {
        public bool DebugMode { get; set; } = false;
    }
}

Implementation

var jsonObject = new AppConfigurationSettings();
WriteToJsonFile<AppConfigurationSettings>(file.FullName, jsonObject);

Output

{
  "AppSettings": {
    "DebugMode": false
  }
}
| improve this answer | |

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.