1155

I have classes like these:

class MyDate
{
    int year, month, day;
}

class Lad
{
    string firstName;
    string lastName;
    MyDate dateOfBirth;
}

And I would like to turn a Lad object into a JSON string like this:

{
    "firstName":"Markoff",
    "lastName":"Chaney",
    "dateOfBirth":
    {
        "year":"1901",
        "month":"4",
        "day":"30"
    }
}

(Without the formatting). I found this link, but it uses a namespace that's not in .NET 4. I also heard about JSON.NET, but their site seems to be down at the moment, and I'm not keen on using external DLL files.

Are there other options besides manually creating a JSON string writer?

5
  • 4
    JSON.net can be loaded here An other and faster (as they say - I did not test it myself) solution is ServiceStack.Text I would not recommend rolling your own JSON parser. It will likely be slower and more error prone or you have to invest lots of time.
    – Zebi
    Jun 1, 2011 at 13:01
  • 1
    yes. C# has a type called JavaScriptSerializer Jun 1, 2011 at 13:02
  • possible duplicate of Generics / JSON JavaScriptSerializer C# Jun 1, 2011 at 13:03
  • 3
    Hm.. as far as I can see you should be able to use: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/… Which is also in .Net 4.0 according to the MSDN page. You should be able to use the Serialize(Object obj) method: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb292287.aspx Am I missing something here? Btw. you link seems to be a some code and not a link
    – Holger
    Jun 1, 2011 at 13:04
  • Not to mention it has no dependencies on the System.Web.Xyz namespaces... Mar 6, 2013 at 18:58

15 Answers 15

1329

Since we all love one-liners

... this one depends on the Newtonsoft NuGet package, which is popular and better than the default serializer.

Newtonsoft.Json.JsonConvert.SerializeObject(new {foo = "bar"})

Documentation: Serializing and Deserializing JSON

8
  • 157
    Newtonsoft serializer is way faster and mor customizable then built in. Highly recommend to use it. Thanks for the answer @willsteel
    – Andrei
    Oct 2, 2013 at 13:04
  • 9
    @JosefPfleger the pricing is for JSON.NET Schema, not JSON.NET the regular serializer, which is MIT Jun 3, 2015 at 19:51
  • 1
    My testing showed that Newtonsoft is slower than JavaScriptSerializer class. (.NET 4.5.2)
    – nemke
    Sep 28, 2015 at 11:34
  • 37
    If you read the MSDN documentation for JavaScriptSerializer, it flat out says use JSON.net.
    – dsghi
    Nov 5, 2015 at 6:10
  • 5
    @JosefPfleger Newtionsoft JSON.net is MIT licensed... you could make modifications and resell it it you wanted. Their pricing page is about commercial technical support, and some schema validator they have.
    – cb88
    Aug 24, 2016 at 15:28
1007

Please Note

Microsoft recommends that you DO NOT USE JavaScriptSerializer

See the header of the documentation page:

For .NET Framework 4.7.2 and later versions, use the APIs in the System.Text.Json namespace for serialization and deserialization. For earlier versions of .NET Framework, use Newtonsoft.Json.


Original answer:

You could use the JavaScriptSerializer class (add reference to System.Web.Extensions):

using System.Web.Script.Serialization;
var json = new JavaScriptSerializer().Serialize(obj);

A full example:

using System;
using System.Web.Script.Serialization;

public class MyDate
{
    public int year;
    public int month;
    public int day;
}

public class Lad
{
    public string firstName;
    public string lastName;
    public MyDate dateOfBirth;
}

class Program
{
    static void Main()
    {
        var obj = new Lad
        {
            firstName = "Markoff",
            lastName = "Chaney",
            dateOfBirth = new MyDate
            {
                year = 1901,
                month = 4,
                day = 30
            }
        };
        var json = new JavaScriptSerializer().Serialize(obj);
        Console.WriteLine(json);
    }
}
8
127

Use Json.Net library, you can download it from Nuget Packet Manager.

Serializing to Json String:

 var obj = new Lad
        {
            firstName = "Markoff",
            lastName = "Chaney",
            dateOfBirth = new MyDate
            {
                year = 1901,
                month = 4,
                day = 30
            }
        };

var jsonString = Newtonsoft.Json.JsonConvert.SerializeObject(obj);

Deserializing to Object:

var obj = Newtonsoft.Json.JsonConvert.DeserializeObject<Lad>(jsonString );
0
63

Use the DataContractJsonSerializer class: MSDN1, MSDN2.

My example: HERE.

It can also safely deserialize objects from a JSON string, unlike JavaScriptSerializer. But personally I still prefer Json.NET.

7
  • 2
    Still don't see any examples on that page, but here are some on MSDN and elsewhere -> the last one uses extension methods to achieve one-liners. Jan 17, 2015 at 21:26
  • Oh, I missed the 2nd MSDN link :) Jan 19, 2015 at 8:48
  • 4
    It doesn't serialize plain classes. The error reported "Consider marking it with the DataContractAttribute attribute, and marking all of its members you want serialized with the DataMemberAttribute attribute. If the type is a collection, consider marking it with the CollectionDataContractAttribute." Jul 14, 2016 at 2:56
  • @MichaelFreidgeim That's right, you have to mark properties in the class you want to serialize with attributes. DataContractAttribute DataMemberAttribute
    – Edgar
    Jul 15, 2016 at 6:25
  • 1
    @MichaelFreidgeim Which is better depends on the requirements. The attributes let you configure how the property is serialized.
    – Edgar
    Jul 15, 2016 at 13:49
58

A new JSON serializer is available in the System.Text.Json namespace. It's included in the .NET Core 3.0 shared framework and is in a NuGet package for projects that target .NET Standard or .NET Framework or .NET Core 2.x.

Example code:

using System;
using System.Text.Json;

public class MyDate
{
    public int year { get; set; }
    public int month { get; set; }
    public int day { get; set; }
}

public class Lad
{
    public string FirstName { get; set; }
    public string LastName { get; set; }
    public MyDate DateOfBirth { get; set; }
}

class Program
{
    static void Main()
    {
        var lad = new Lad
        {
            FirstName = "Markoff",
            LastName = "Chaney",
            DateOfBirth = new MyDate
            {
                year = 1901,
                month = 4,
                day = 30
            }
        };
        var json = JsonSerializer.Serialize(lad);
        Console.WriteLine(json);
    }
}

In this example the classes to be serialized have properties rather than fields; the System.Text.Json serializer currently doesn't serialize fields.

Documentation:

1
  • Side notes: (1) in order to manage a json serialization the properties of the class must have at least getters, (2) JsonSerializer.Serialize(lad) prints all in one line; if you want to get an indented printout use the json options, (3) I would rather override ToString() in the class itself, so that you have never have to write again the whole JsonSerializer.Serialize(lad) sentence, just put inside the class this: public override string ToString() => JsonSerializer.Serialize(this, new JsonSerializerOptions { WriteIndented = true }); Dec 23, 2021 at 11:36
33

You can achieve this by using Newtonsoft.json. Install Newtonsoft.json from NuGet. And then:

using Newtonsoft.Json;

var jsonString = JsonConvert.SerializeObject(obj);
25

Wooou! Really better using a JSON framework :)

Here is my example using Json.NET (http://james.newtonking.com/json):

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Text;
using Newtonsoft.Json;
using System.IO;

namespace com.blogspot.jeanjmichel.jsontest.model
{
    public class Contact
    {
        private Int64 id;
        private String name;
        List<Address> addresses;

        public Int64 Id
        {
            set { this.id = value; }
            get { return this.id; }
        }

        public String Name
        {
            set { this.name = value; }
            get { return this.name; }
        }

        public List<Address> Addresses
        {
            set { this.addresses = value; }
            get { return this.addresses; }
        }

        public String ToJSONRepresentation()
        {
            StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
            JsonWriter jw = new JsonTextWriter(new StringWriter(sb));

            jw.Formatting = Formatting.Indented;
            jw.WriteStartObject();
            jw.WritePropertyName("id");
            jw.WriteValue(this.Id);
            jw.WritePropertyName("name");
            jw.WriteValue(this.Name);

            jw.WritePropertyName("addresses");
            jw.WriteStartArray();

            int i;
            i = 0;

            for (i = 0; i < addresses.Count; i++)
            {
                jw.WriteStartObject();
                jw.WritePropertyName("id");
                jw.WriteValue(addresses[i].Id);
                jw.WritePropertyName("streetAddress");
                jw.WriteValue(addresses[i].StreetAddress);
                jw.WritePropertyName("complement");
                jw.WriteValue(addresses[i].Complement);
                jw.WritePropertyName("city");
                jw.WriteValue(addresses[i].City);
                jw.WritePropertyName("province");
                jw.WriteValue(addresses[i].Province);
                jw.WritePropertyName("country");
                jw.WriteValue(addresses[i].Country);
                jw.WritePropertyName("postalCode");
                jw.WriteValue(addresses[i].PostalCode);
                jw.WriteEndObject();
            }

            jw.WriteEndArray();

            jw.WriteEndObject();

            return sb.ToString();
        }

        public Contact()
        {
        }

        public Contact(Int64 id, String personName, List<Address> addresses)
        {
            this.id = id;
            this.name = personName;
            this.addresses = addresses;
        }

        public Contact(String JSONRepresentation)
        {
            //To do
        }
    }
}

The test:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using com.blogspot.jeanjmichel.jsontest.model;

namespace com.blogspot.jeanjmichel.jsontest.main
{
    public class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            List<Address> addresses = new List<Address>();
            addresses.Add(new Address(1, "Rua Dr. Fernandes Coelho, 85", "15º andar", "São Paulo", "São Paulo", "Brazil", "05423040"));
            addresses.Add(new Address(2, "Avenida Senador Teotônio Vilela, 241", null, "São Paulo", "São Paulo", "Brazil", null));

            Contact contact = new Contact(1, "Ayrton Senna", addresses);

            Console.WriteLine(contact.ToJSONRepresentation());
            Console.ReadKey();
        }
    }
}

The result:

{
  "id": 1,
  "name": "Ayrton Senna",
  "addresses": [
    {
      "id": 1,
      "streetAddress": "Rua Dr. Fernandes Coelho, 85",
      "complement": "15º andar",
      "city": "São Paulo",
      "province": "São Paulo",
      "country": "Brazil",
      "postalCode": "05423040"
    },
    {
      "id": 2,
      "streetAddress": "Avenida Senador Teotônio Vilela, 241",
      "complement": null,
      "city": "São Paulo",
      "province": "São Paulo",
      "country": "Brazil",
      "postalCode": null
    }
  ]
}

Now I will implement the constructor method that will receives a JSON string and populates the class' fields.

4
  • 1
    Good post, this is the most current way to do it.
    – MatthewD
    May 30, 2016 at 13:33
  • 1
    I guess one expects to find a unit test under "The test" section, whereas there is none. btw, I like the approach where the Contact object knows how to convert itself to JSON. What I don't like in this example, is that the object is not actually an object from OOP perspective, rather than just bunch of public methods and properties. Mar 13, 2021 at 16:41
  • "com.blogspot.jeanjmichel.jsontest.main" Ah, a Java programmer falls to the dark side. Welcome. We have cookies.
    – Corey
    Jun 7, 2021 at 23:56
  • Hahahahaha yes @Corey =) Jun 23, 2021 at 13:53
10

If they are not very big, what's probably your case export it as JSON.

Also this makes it portable among all platforms.

using Newtonsoft.Json;

[TestMethod]
public void ExportJson()
{
    double[,] b = new double[,]
        {
            { 110,  120,  130,  140, 150 },
            {1110, 1120, 1130, 1140, 1150},
            {1000,    1,   5,     9, 1000},
            {1110,    2,   6,    10, 1110},
            {1220,    3,   7,    11, 1220},
            {1330,    4,   8,    12, 1330}
        };

    string jsonStr = JsonConvert.SerializeObject(b);

    Console.WriteLine(jsonStr);

    string path = "X:\\Programming\\workspaceEclipse\\PyTutorials\\src\\tensorflow_tutorials\\export.txt";

    File.WriteAllText(path, jsonStr);
}
8

If you are in an ASP.NET MVC web controller it's as simple as:

string ladAsJson = Json(Lad);

Can't believe no one has mentioned this.

2
  • 1
    I get an error about not being able to cast jsonresult to string.
    – csga5000
    Sep 23, 2016 at 5:30
  • It will compile with implicit typing: var ladAsJson = Json(Lad).
    – ewomack
    Nov 7, 2016 at 19:55
6

I would vote for ServiceStack's JSON Serializer:

using ServiceStack;

string jsonString = new { FirstName = "James" }.ToJson();

It is also the fastest JSON serializer available for .NET: http://www.servicestack.net/benchmarks/

5
  • 6
    Those are very old benchmarks there. I've just test all three current versions of Newtonsoft, ServiceStack and JavaScriptSerializer and currently Newtonsoft is the fastest. Tho they all do quite fast. Oct 25, 2013 at 9:22
  • 1
    ServiceStack doesn't appear to be free.
    – joelnet
    Dec 19, 2013 at 0:25
  • 1
    @joelnet this is now the case, but was free when answering the question. However it is free for small sites, and I am still using it even though it is paid, it is a superb framework.
    – James
    Dec 19, 2013 at 10:21
  • Some benchmarks here, though there's non for the serialization on its own: docs.servicestack.net/real-world-performance
    – JohnLBevan
    Dec 13, 2018 at 9:39
  • 2
    @joelnet Seems to be free now. Don't know when they changed it.
    – Aage
    Jun 22, 2020 at 11:48
3

Another solution using System.Text.Json (.NET Core 3.0+, .NET 5) where an object is self-sufficient and doesn't expose all possible fields:

A passing test:

using NUnit.Framework;

namespace Intech.UnitTests
{
    public class UserTests
    {
        [Test]
        public void ConvertsItselfToJson()
        {
            var userName = "John";
            var user = new User(userName);

            var actual = user.ToJson();

            Assert.AreEqual($"{{\"Name\":\"{userName}\"}}", actual);
        }
    }
}

An implementation:

using System.Text.Json;
using System.Collections.Generic;

namespace Intech
{
    public class User
    {
        private readonly string Name;

        public User(string name)
        {
            this.Name = name;
        }

        public string ToJson()
        {
            var params = new Dictionary<string, string>{{"Name", Name}};
            return JsonSerializer.Serialize(params);
        }
    }
}
1
  • I am having to write code in a VM not connected to the internet, so this is very useful.
    – TomDestry
    Apr 14, 2021 at 21:23
2

It is as easy as this (it works for dynamic objects as well (type object)):

string json = new
System.Web.Script.Serialization.JavaScriptSerializer().Serialize(MYOBJECT);
3
  • there is no default script under web. :(
    – M at
    Jul 11, 2016 at 7:17
  • You are looking for this:msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/…
    – MarzSocks
    Jul 11, 2016 at 19:08
  • I kind of tried that but no. Script I guess I should add it as reference. So thanks a lot
    – M at
    Jul 12, 2016 at 3:43
2

In your Lad model class, add an override to the ToString() method that returns a JSON string version of your Lad object.
Note: you will need to import System.Text.Json;

using System.Text.Json;

class MyDate
{
    int year, month, day;
}

class Lad
{
    public string firstName { get; set; };
    public string lastName { get; set; };
    public MyDate dateOfBirth { get; set; };
    public override string ToString() => JsonSerializer.Serialize<Lad>(this);
}
2
  • 1
    JsonSerializer.Serialize<Lad>(this) can be simplified to JsonSerializer.Serialize(this)
    – malat
    Oct 21, 2021 at 8:29
  • 1
    Side notes: (1) in order to manage a json serialization the properties of the class must have at least getters, (2) JsonSerializer.Serialize(lad) prints all in one line; if you want to get an indented printout use the json options, (3) I would rather override ToString() like this: public override string ToString() => JsonSerializer.Serialize(this, new JsonSerializerOptions { WriteIndented = true }); Dec 23, 2021 at 11:41
1

Here is another solution using Cinchoo ETL - an open source library

public class MyDate
{
    public int year { get; set; }
    public int month { get; set; }
    public int day { get; set; }
}

public class Lad
{
    public string firstName { get; set; }
    public string lastName { get; set; }
    public MyDate dateOfBirth { get; set; }
}

static void ToJsonString()
{
    var obj = new Lad
    {
        firstName = "Tom",
        lastName = "Smith",
        dateOfBirth = new MyDate
        {
            year = 1901,
            month = 4,
            day = 30
        }
    };
    var json = ChoJSONWriter.Serialize<Lad>(obj);

    Console.WriteLine(json);
}

Output:

{
  "firstName": "Tom",
  "lastName": "Smith",
  "dateOfBirth": {
    "year": 1901,
    "month": 4,
    "day": 30
  }
}

Disclaimer: I'm the author of this library.

0

Serializer

 public static void WriteToJsonFile<T>(string filePath, T objectToWrite, bool append = false) where T : new()
{
        var contentsToWriteToFile = JsonConvert.SerializeObject(objectToWrite, new JsonSerializerSettings
        {
            Formatting = Formatting.Indented,
        });
        using (var writer = new StreamWriter(filePath, append))
        {
            writer.Write(contentsToWriteToFile);
        }
}

Object

namespace MyConfig
{
    public class AppConfigurationSettings
    {
        public AppConfigurationSettings()
        {
            /* initialize the object if you want to output a new document
             * for use as a template or default settings possibly when 
             * an app is started.
             */
            if (AppSettings == null) { AppSettings=new AppSettings();}
        }

        public AppSettings AppSettings { get; set; }
    }

    public class AppSettings
    {
        public bool DebugMode { get; set; } = false;
    }
}

Implementation

var jsonObject = new AppConfigurationSettings();
WriteToJsonFile<AppConfigurationSettings>(file.FullName, jsonObject);

Output

{
  "AppSettings": {
    "DebugMode": false
  }
}
0

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.