29

I use ternary operators alot but I can't seem to stack multiple ternary operator inside each other.

I am aware that stacking multiple ternary operator would make the code less readable but in some case I would like to do it.

This is what I've tried so far :

$foo = 1;
$bar = ( $foo == 1 ) ? "1" : ( $foo == 2 ) ? "2" : "other";
echo $bar; // display 2 instead of 1

What is the correct syntax ?

0

8 Answers 8

70

Those parenthesis are what I think is getting you.

Try

$foo = 1;
$bar = ($foo == 1) ? "1" : (($foo == 2)  ? "2" : "other");
echo $bar;
0
26

The problem is that PHP, unlike all other languages, makes the conditional operator left associative. This breaks your code – which would be fine in other languages.

You need to use parentheses:

$bar = $foo == 1 ? "1" : ($foo == 2 ? "2" : "other");

(Notice that I’ve removed the other parentheses from your code; but these were correct, just redundant.)

1
  • 1
    "Notice that I’ve removed the other parentheses from your code; but these were correct, just redundant" - but with a parser like that, you can never be sure... ;-)
    – Alnitak
    Jun 1, 2011 at 15:06
12

You need some parentheses around the right hand operand:

$foo = 1;
$bar = ( $foo == 1 ) ? "1" : (( $foo == 2 ) ? "2" : "other");
echo $bar;

PHP's interpreter is broken, and treats your line:

$bar = ( $foo == 1 ) ? "1" : ( $foo == 2 ) ? "2" : "other";

as

$bar = (( $foo == 1) ? "1" : ( $foo == 2)) ? "2" : "other";

and since that left hand expression evaluates as "true" the first operand of the remaining ternary operator ("2") is returned instead.

4
  • -1 Broken? The parser behaves exactly as defined by PHPs operator precedence and associativity overview: php.net/manual/en/language.operators.precedence.php
    – NikiC
    Jun 1, 2011 at 15:24
  • 3
    @nikic PHP's manual documented the implementation - the documents don't define the implementation, as PHP never had a formal specification. The implementation is broken (i.e. different) when compared to every other language that supports the ternary operator.
    – Alnitak
    Jun 1, 2011 at 16:16
  • If you meant to say that it was different to what you are used to, why not say just that?
    – NikiC
    Jun 1, 2011 at 17:05
  • 5
    @nikic I said exactly what I meant to say. Any sane language "design" would have followed the precedent set by C, C++, Java, etc.
    – Alnitak
    Jun 1, 2011 at 17:13
5

Put parenthesis around each inner ternary operator, this way operator priority is assured:

$bar = ( $foo == 1 ) ? "1" : (( $foo == 2 ) ? "2" : "other");
4

You could write this correctly thus:

$bar = ($foo == 1) ? "1" : (($foo == 2) ? "2" : "other");

(i.e.: Simply embed the 'inner' ternary operator in parenthesis.)

However, I'd be really tempted not to do this, as it's about as readable as a particularly illegible thing that's been badly smudged - there's never any excuse for obfuscating code, and this borders on it.

4

Just stack up the parenthesis, and you've got it:

$bar = ($foo==1? "1" : ($foo==2? "2" : "other"));

As an aside, if you've got many clauses, you should consider using a switch:

switch ( $bar ) {
  case 1:  echo "1";
  case 2:  echo "2";
  default: echo "other";
}

If the switch gets long, you can wrap it in a function.

1
  • This is a good example of why the switch statement is flawed. This example does not have any break; lines, so "2" will unintentionally be echoed for case 1. Feb 13, 2023 at 10:22
3
$foo = 1;
$bar = ( $foo == 1 ) ? "1" : (( $foo == 2 ) ? "2" : "other");
echo $bar;

Just use extra ( ) and it will work

2

Add the parenthesis:

$bar = ( $foo == 1 ) ? "1" : (( $foo == 2 ) ? "2" : "other");

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