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I have below Java code to convert string format to Timestamp object

public class TestUtil{
  Object result;

 Public Object convertFormat(String format, String value, String type){

 String format = "yyyyMMddHHmmss";
 String value = "20050225144824";
 SimpleDateFormat dformat = new SimpleDateFormat(format);
 java.util.Date date = dformat.parse(value);
 result = new Timestamp(date.getTime);
 System.out.println("Result::"+  result);
 }
}

Expected outcome: I was expecting the outcome should be like below

 20050225144824

Actual outcome:

  2005-02-25 14:48:24.0

Could anyone tell me what I am missing here? To get "20050225144824" this result

5
  • 1
    you don't print anything, where did you get that "result"? Either way, for a formatted value, you have String objects, Date/Time types are never formatted.
    – Stultuske
    May 27 '20 at 5:13
  • 1
    date.getTime will not work May 27 '20 at 5:14
  • To get "20050225144824" - print the value variable May 27 '20 at 5:14
  • 1
    Your title states Java 8 Format Timestamp – Is there a good reason (please state it) for not using the Java 8 Date/Time APIs?
    – Ivo Mori
    May 27 '20 at 5:19
  • public starts with small p but you are using P May 27 '20 at 5:20
1

The below code runs fine for me.

Adding few print statements to explain the different behaviors.

import java.util.Date;
import java.text.SimpleDateFormat;  
import java.sql.Timestamp;

public class Main
{
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        String myFormat = "yyyyMMddHHmmss";
        String value = "20050225144824";

        try {
        SimpleDateFormat dformat = new SimpleDateFormat("yyyyMMddHHmmss");
        Date date = dformat.parse(value);
        Timestamp ts = new Timestamp(date.getTime());
        Object result = new Timestamp(date.getTime());

        System.out.println("Timestamp Format with yyyyMMddHHmmss : " +dformat.format(ts));
        System.out.println("Object Format with yyyyMMddHHmmss    : " +result);
        System.out.println("Object Format with yyyyMMddHHmmss    : " +dformat.format(result));

        } catch(Exception e) { 
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }
}

Here is the output of the different behaviors :

   Timestamp Format with yyyyMMddHHmmss : 20050225144824                                                                                               
   Object Format with yyyyMMddHHmmss    : 2005-02-25 14:48:24.0                                                                                        
   Object Format with yyyyMMddHHmmss    : 20050225144824 
5
  • Hi Som. I need to return Timestamp object not string. So I can't use this String resultTS = dformat.format(ts);
    – Manu
    May 27 '20 at 6:29
  • @Manu : I have edited my code above. I am not using the String resultTS. Directly printing the dformat.format(ts) . You try to return just this value from your method, if you need to do so.
    – Som
    May 27 '20 at 6:41
  • You return the Timestamp object as it is. But when you need your desired format you use : dformat.format(ts) . That will b easier for you.
    – Som
    May 27 '20 at 6:51
  • So without df.format(ts) can't I return "20050225144824" ? I guess "new Timestamp(date.getTime())" by default returns "2005-02-25 14:48:24.0"
    – Manu
    May 27 '20 at 6:59
  • @Manu : I guess no. Either in calling method you need to use dformat.format(ts) or in the called method. Also I have added few print statements to explain the behavior. Please check the print statements and results accordingly.
    – Som
    May 27 '20 at 7:07
0

If you expect Timestamp to return your custom output then you need to override the default Timestamp library.

Here I create CustomTimestamp.java to extend Timestamp and override its toString() method. I modified the changes according to your requirement.

public class CustomTimestamp extends Timestamp {

    private int nanos;

    public CustomTimestamp(long time) {
        super(time);
    }

    @Override
    public String toString () {

        int year = super.getYear() + 1900;
        int month = super.getMonth() + 1;
        int day = super.getDate();
        int hour = super.getHours();
        int minute = super.getMinutes();
        int second = super.getSeconds();
        String yearString;
        String monthString;
        String dayString;
        String hourString;
        String minuteString;
        String secondString;
        String nanosString;
        String zeros = "000000000";
        String yearZeros = "0000";
        StringBuffer timestampBuf;

        if (year < 1000) {
            // Add leading zeros
            yearString = "" + year;
            yearString = yearZeros.substring(0, (4-yearString.length())) +
                yearString;
        } else {
            yearString = "" + year;
        }
        if (month < 10) {
            monthString = "0" + month;
        } else {
            monthString = Integer.toString(month);
        }
        if (day < 10) {
            dayString = "0" + day;
        } else {
            dayString = Integer.toString(day);
        }
        if (hour < 10) {
            hourString = "0" + hour;
        } else {
            hourString = Integer.toString(hour);
        }
        if (minute < 10) {
            minuteString = "0" + minute;
        } else {
            minuteString = Integer.toString(minute);
        }
        if (second < 10) {
            secondString = "0" + second;
        } else {
            secondString = Integer.toString(second);
        }
        if (nanos == 0) {
            nanosString = "";
        } else {
            nanosString = Integer.toString(nanos);

            // Add leading zeros
            nanosString = zeros.substring(0, (9-nanosString.length())) +
                nanosString;

            // Truncate trailing zeros
            char[] nanosChar = new char[nanosString.length()];
            nanosString.getChars(0, nanosString.length(), nanosChar, 0);
            int truncIndex = 8;
            while (nanosChar[truncIndex] == '0') {
                truncIndex--;
            }

            nanosString = new String(nanosChar, 0, truncIndex + 1);

        }

        // do a string buffer here instead.
        timestampBuf = new StringBuffer(20+nanosString.length());
        timestampBuf.append(yearString);
        timestampBuf.append(monthString);
        timestampBuf.append(dayString);
        timestampBuf.append(hourString);
        timestampBuf.append(minuteString);
        timestampBuf.append(secondString);
        timestampBuf.append(nanosString);

        return (timestampBuf.toString());
    }
}

Your main class should use CustomTimestamp to get the output

try {
    String format = "yyyyMMddHHmmss";
    String value = "20050225144824";
    SimpleDateFormat dformat = new SimpleDateFormat(format);
    java.util.Date date;
    date = dformat.parse(value);
    Timestamp result = new CustomTimestamp(date.getTime());
    System.out.println("Result::" + result);
} catch (ParseException e) {
    e.printStackTrace();
}
1
  • I am trying to convert incoming string date value( 20050225144824) to Timestamp object
    – Manu
    May 27 '20 at 6:22

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