10

POSIX's page on stderr, stdin, stdout - standard I/O streams says this:

The stderr stream is expected to be open for reading and writing.

How strong is "expected to be"? Is violating it Undefined Behavior? And whose responsibility is it, the system's or the application's?

Consider this program:

#include <stdio.h>

int main(void) {
    printf("feof is %d and ferror is %d\n", feof(stderr), ferror(stderr));
    printf("fgetc is %d\n", fgetc(stderr));
    printf("feof is %d and ferror is %d\n", feof(stderr), ferror(stderr));
}

When I run that without redirecting stderr (so it's pointing to my terminal just like stdin is), it immediately outputs this without waiting for any input:

feof is 0 and ferror is 0
fgetc is -1
feof is 0 and ferror is 1

Does that mean my system isn't POSIX-compliant?

Also, if it's my responsibility, then suppose I have a file with permissions 620, and that I'm in the group but not the owner. Does this mean that someprogram 2>saidfile is Undefined Behavior, since you couldn't read from stderr no matter what in that case?

  • Traditionally, the login command (or the getty program run before login) would open the tty device for reading and writing as file descriptor 0 (standard input), and use dup() to create file descriptors 1 (standard output) and 2 (standard error). Thus, the shell launched by login would probably have all three standard I/O descriptors that are readable and writable (but the I/O streams might not be as flexible). I was not aware of the POSIX requirement; it was formally added in Issue 6 (POSIX 2004). It will be the responsibility of the system (shell) to provide a readable stderr. – Jonathan Leffler May 27 at 21:38
  • @JonathanLeffler But even when FD 2 is open for reading and writing, trying to read from the stderr stream fails (if I want it to work, I have to use the FD directly). And that seems to be exactly what POSIX says isn't supposed to happen. – Joseph Sible-Reinstate Monica May 27 at 21:39
  • What's also weird is the note that "The functionality described on this reference page is aligned with the ISO C standard", yet ISO C contains no such requirement as this. – Nate Eldredge May 27 at 21:41
  • 1
    I'm expanding a bit on where I think the requirement came from; I'm not able to account for it, and I'm puzzled about the specification that stderr (as distinct from 'standard error') is readable and writable. Of course, you should be using a positioning operation (e.g. fseek(stderr, 0L, SEEK_CUR)) between reading and writing, or between writing and reading, for file streams. I note that POSIX doesn't say anything about whether stdin or stdout need to be both readable and writable. The requirement is in a POSIX extension section: [CX] ⌦ … ⌫ — it is a pure extension over standard C. – Jonathan Leffler May 27 at 21:43
  • If there's nonconformance here, it seems like it's the fault of the C library, refusing to accept reads on stderr even when fd 2 is open for reading. My system (glibc on Ubuntu 19.1) does this as well. But not the shell's fault, anyway. – Nate Eldredge May 27 at 21:58
0

POSIX elaborates on this in the specification for execve:

If file descriptor 0, 1, or 2 would otherwise be closed after a successful call to one of the exec family of functions, implementations may open an unspecified file for the file descriptor in the new process image. If a standard utility or a conforming application is executed with file descriptor 0 not open for reading or with file descriptor 1 or 2 not open for writing, the environment in which the utility or application is executed shall be deemed non-conforming, and consequently the utility or application might not behave as described in this standard.

For your own applications, they should be prepared for the possibility that the implementation opens new stdin/out/err for them if they try to exec with any of them closed, and can set their own rules (including deeming it a contract violation resulting in catastrophically wrong behavior) for how they handle it if the standard file descriptors are not open when they start.

For standard utilities, the above text covers it.

The document you cited just specifies that they're associated with those file descriptors. I agree it's not sufficiently clear, but the reasonable interpretation would be that, if the corresponding file descriptors are not open or not open for the appropriate modes at application entry, the results are those specified for that condition (typically EBADF) under the relevant functions. For example, fgetc specifies:

[EBADF]

[CX] [Option Start] The file descriptor underlying stream is not a valid file descriptor open for reading. [Option End]

Regarding the "expected to be" text:

The stderr stream is expected to be open for reading and writing.

I don't think "expected to be" is defined anywhere in the standard. However, the word stream is used here, not file/file-descriptor, so I would read that as the FILE mode (as in fopen modes) for the stderr stream is such that neither read nor write functions on it produce undefined behavior as long as the rules about switching between them are honored. Without this text, e.g. in plain without POSIX on top, fgetc(stderr) would potentially produce undefined behavior.

| improve this answer | |
  • That seems to be talking about bare file descriptors, not streams, and doesn't mention reading from stderr at all. – Joseph Sible-Reinstate Monica May 28 at 2:49
  • The document you cite just specifies that they're associated with those file descriptors. I agree it's not sufficiently clear, but the reasonable interpretation would be that, if the corresponding file descriptors are not open or not open for the appropriate modes at application entry, the results are those specified for that condition (typically EBADF). – R.. GitHub STOP HELPING ICE May 28 at 3:05
  • But it specifically says "reading" in regards to standard error. – Joseph Sible-Reinstate Monica May 28 at 3:06
  • 1
    The EBADF note makes the situation even stranger, because in my tests, file descriptor 2 is open for reading; you can do read(2, buf, size) and it succeeds. Yet when you do fgetc(stderr), it returns EOF with errno == EBADF. Basically, it seems as though the C startup code is doing stderr = fdopen(2, "w") without regard to whether file descriptor 2 is open for reading or not. – Nate Eldredge May 28 at 12:21
  • 3
    @NateEldredge: I've filed a request for interpretation/clarification with the standard: austingroupbugs.net/view.php?id=1347 – R.. GitHub STOP HELPING ICE May 28 at 19:51

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.