56

I'm using Microsoft Expression Blend 4
I have a Browser ..,

[ XAML ] ConnectionView " Empty Code Behind "

        <WebBrowser local:AttachedProperties.BrowserSource="{Binding Source}">
            <i:Interaction.Triggers>
                <i:EventTrigger>
                    <i:InvokeCommandAction Command="{Binding LoadedEvent}"/>
                </i:EventTrigger>
                <i:EventTrigger EventName="Navigated">
                    <i:InvokeCommandAction Command="{Binding NavigatedEvent}" CommandParameter="??????"/>
                </i:EventTrigger>
            </i:Interaction.Triggers>
        </WebBrowser>  

[ C# ] AttachedProperties class

public static class AttachedProperties
    {
        public static readonly DependencyProperty BrowserSourceProperty = DependencyProperty . RegisterAttached ( "BrowserSource" , typeof ( string ) , typeof ( AttachedProperties ) , new UIPropertyMetadata ( null , BrowserSourcePropertyChanged ) );

        public static string GetBrowserSource ( DependencyObject _DependencyObject )
        {
            return ( string ) _DependencyObject . GetValue ( BrowserSourceProperty );
        }

        public static void SetBrowserSource ( DependencyObject _DependencyObject , string Value )
        {
            _DependencyObject . SetValue ( BrowserSourceProperty , Value );
        }

        public static void BrowserSourcePropertyChanged ( DependencyObject _DependencyObject , DependencyPropertyChangedEventArgs _DependencyPropertyChangedEventArgs )
        {
            WebBrowser _WebBrowser = _DependencyObject as WebBrowser;
            if ( _WebBrowser != null )
            {
                string URL = _DependencyPropertyChangedEventArgs . NewValue as string;
                _WebBrowser . Source = URL != null ? new Uri ( URL ) : null;
            }
        }
    }

[ C# ] ConnectionViewModel Class

public class ConnectionViewModel : ViewModelBase
    {
            public string Source
            {
                get { return Get<string> ( "Source" ); }
                set { Set ( "Source" , value ); }
            }

            public void Execute_ExitCommand ( )
            {
                Application . Current . Shutdown ( );
            }

            public void Execute_LoadedEvent ( )
            {
                MessageBox . Show ( "___Execute_LoadedEvent___" );
                Source = ...... ;
            }

            public void Execute_NavigatedEvent ( )
            {
                MessageBox . Show ( "___Execute_NavigatedEvent___" );
            }
    }

[ C# ] ViewModelBase class Here

Finally :
Binding with commands works well and MessageBoxes shown


My Question :
How to pass NavigationEventArgs as Command Parameters when Navigated Event occurs ?

12 Answers 12

60

It's not easily supported. Here's an article with instructions on how to pass EventArgs as command parameters.

You might want to look into using MVVMLight - it supports EventArgs in command directly; your situation would look something like this:

 <i:Interaction.Triggers>
    <i:EventTrigger EventName="Navigated">
        <cmd:EventToCommand Command="{Binding NavigatedEvent}"
            PassEventArgsToCommand="True" />
    </i:EventTrigger>
 </i:Interaction.Triggers>
  • 1
    then there is no direct method ? as I hate using templates which always have bugs .. etc , so I like coding from scratch – Ahmed Ghoneim Jun 1 '11 at 18:20
  • 51
    @Ahmed Adel: That is a rather amusing statement. – H.B. Jun 2 '11 at 2:27
  • 4
    Really, just use MVVM Light. It's far simpler and you really only need to use the RelayCommand and EventToCommand classes. – Mike Post Jun 2 '11 at 22:32
  • 1
    Silverlight/WPF isn't an easy thing in general, is it? – Trident D'Gao Nov 26 '12 at 13:00
39

I try to keep my dependencies to a minimum, so I implemented this myself instead of going with EventToCommand of MVVMLight. Works for me so far, but feedback is welcome.

Xaml:

<i:Interaction.Behaviors>
    <beh:EventToCommandBehavior Command="{Binding DropCommand}" Event="Drop" PassArguments="True" />
</i:Interaction.Behaviors>

ViewModel:

public ActionCommand<DragEventArgs> DropCommand { get; private set; }

this.DropCommand = new ActionCommand<DragEventArgs>(OnDrop);

private void OnDrop(DragEventArgs e)
{
    // ...
}

EventToCommandBehavior:

/// <summary>
/// Behavior that will connect an UI event to a viewmodel Command,
/// allowing the event arguments to be passed as the CommandParameter.
/// </summary>
public class EventToCommandBehavior : Behavior<FrameworkElement>
{
    private Delegate _handler;
    private EventInfo _oldEvent;

    // Event
    public string Event { get { return (string)GetValue(EventProperty); } set { SetValue(EventProperty, value); } }
    public static readonly DependencyProperty EventProperty = DependencyProperty.Register("Event", typeof(string), typeof(EventToCommandBehavior), new PropertyMetadata(null, OnEventChanged));

    // Command
    public ICommand Command { get { return (ICommand)GetValue(CommandProperty); } set { SetValue(CommandProperty, value); } }
    public static readonly DependencyProperty CommandProperty = DependencyProperty.Register("Command", typeof(ICommand), typeof(EventToCommandBehavior), new PropertyMetadata(null));

    // PassArguments (default: false)
    public bool PassArguments { get { return (bool)GetValue(PassArgumentsProperty); } set { SetValue(PassArgumentsProperty, value); } }
    public static readonly DependencyProperty PassArgumentsProperty = DependencyProperty.Register("PassArguments", typeof(bool), typeof(EventToCommandBehavior), new PropertyMetadata(false));


    private static void OnEventChanged(DependencyObject d, DependencyPropertyChangedEventArgs e)
    {
        var beh = (EventToCommandBehavior)d;

        if (beh.AssociatedObject != null) // is not yet attached at initial load
            beh.AttachHandler((string)e.NewValue);
    }

    protected override void OnAttached()
    {
        AttachHandler(this.Event); // initial set
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Attaches the handler to the event
    /// </summary>
    private void AttachHandler(string eventName)
    {
        // detach old event
        if (_oldEvent != null)
            _oldEvent.RemoveEventHandler(this.AssociatedObject, _handler);

        // attach new event
        if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(eventName))
        {
            EventInfo ei = this.AssociatedObject.GetType().GetEvent(eventName);
            if (ei != null)
            {
                MethodInfo mi = this.GetType().GetMethod("ExecuteCommand", BindingFlags.Instance | BindingFlags.NonPublic);
                _handler = Delegate.CreateDelegate(ei.EventHandlerType, this, mi);
                ei.AddEventHandler(this.AssociatedObject, _handler);
                _oldEvent = ei; // store to detach in case the Event property changes
            }
            else
                throw new ArgumentException(string.Format("The event '{0}' was not found on type '{1}'", eventName, this.AssociatedObject.GetType().Name));
        }
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Executes the Command
    /// </summary>
    private void ExecuteCommand(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        object parameter = this.PassArguments ? e : null;
        if (this.Command != null)
        {
            if (this.Command.CanExecute(parameter))
                this.Command.Execute(parameter);
        }
    }
}

ActionCommand:

public class ActionCommand<T> : ICommand
{
    public event EventHandler CanExecuteChanged;
    private Action<T> _action;

    public ActionCommand(Action<T> action)
    {
        _action = action;
    }

    public bool CanExecute(object parameter) { return true; }

    public void Execute(object parameter)
    {
        if (_action != null)
        {
            var castParameter = (T)Convert.ChangeType(parameter, typeof(T));
            _action(castParameter);
        }
    }
}
  • 2
    An acceptable level of boilerplate code to forgo having to adopt the use of another framework. Works well for me too, cheers! – jeebs Jul 8 '13 at 10:32
  • 1
    Interesting solution. The only problem I have this with is that it places UI related code in the ViewModel. DragEventArgs is from System.Windows.Forms and ActionCommand is arguably UI related as well. I tend to keep my ViewModels extremely separated in their own assembly without any UI related references. It keeps me from accidentally crossing the 'line'. It's a personal preference and it is up to each developer how strict they want to adhere to the MVVM pattern. – Matthew Jul 11 '13 at 17:11
  • Matthew, commands are perfectly valid in the MVVM pattern and belong on the ViewModel. It can be argued that EventArgs do not belong there, but if you don't like that you might want to comment it on the question, not on a solution to it. Btw, DragEventArgs is in System.Windows namespace for WPF. – Mike Fuchs Jul 11 '13 at 22:53
  • @Matthew I think we could just create a separate project and add EventToCommandBehavior and ActionCOmmand classes there. That way you can use the SYstem.Windows where needed, and avoid reference to System.Windows.Interactivity namespace, which hosts Behaviors. – Adarsha Jan 23 '14 at 18:01
  • @adabyron Have you ever done this with multiple events? Can I just put multiple instances of this behavior in the xaml? – Walter Williams Nov 25 '15 at 21:39
19

I've always come back here for the answer so I wanted to make a short simple one to go to.

There are multiple ways of doing this:

1. Using WPF Tools. Easiest.

Add Namespaces:

  • System.Windows.Interactivitiy
  • Microsoft.Expression.Interactions

XAML:

Use the EventName to call the event you want then specify your Method name in the MethodName.

<Window>
    xmlns:wi="clr-namespace:System.Windows.Interactivity;assembly=System.Windows.Interactivity"
    xmlns:ei="http://schemas.microsoft.com/expression/2010/interactions">

    <wi:Interaction.Triggers>
        <wi:EventTrigger EventName="SelectionChanged">
            <ei:CallMethodAction
                TargetObject="{Binding}"
                MethodName="ShowCustomer"/>
        </wi:EventTrigger>
    </wi:Interaction.Triggers>
</Window>

Code:

public void ShowCustomer()
{
    // Do something.
}

2. Using MVVMLight. Most difficult.

Install GalaSoft NuGet package.

enter image description here

Get the namespaces:

  • System.Windows.Interactivity
  • GalaSoft.MvvmLight.Platform

XAML:

Use the EventName to call the event you want then specify your Command name in your binding. If you want to pass the arguments of the method, mark PassEventArgsToCommand to true.

<Window>
    xmlns:wi="clr-namespace:System.Windows.Interactivity;assembly=System.Windows.Interactivity"
    xmlns:cmd="http://www.galasoft.ch/mvvmlight">

    <wi:Interaction.Triggers>
       <wi:EventTrigger EventName="Navigated">
           <cmd:EventToCommand Command="{Binding CommandNameHere}"
               PassEventArgsToCommand="True" />
       </wi:EventTrigger>
    </wi:Interaction.Triggers>
</Window>

Code Implementing Delegates: Source

You must get the Prism MVVM NuGet package for this.

enter image description here

using Microsoft.Practices.Prism.Commands;

// With params.
public DelegateCommand<string> CommandOne { get; set; }
// Without params.
public DelegateCommand CommandTwo { get; set; }

public MainWindow()
{
    InitializeComponent();

    // Must initialize the DelegateCommands here.
    CommandOne = new DelegateCommand<string>(executeCommandOne);
    CommandTwo = new DelegateCommand(executeCommandTwo);
}

private void executeCommandOne(string param)
{
    // Do something here.
}

private void executeCommandTwo()
{
    // Do something here.
}

Code Without DelegateCommand: Source

using GalaSoft.MvvmLight.CommandWpf

public MainWindow()
{
    InitializeComponent();

    CommandOne = new RelayCommand<string>(executeCommandOne);
    CommandTwo = new RelayCommand(executeCommandTwo);
}

public RelayCommand<string> CommandOne { get; set; }

public RelayCommand CommandTwo { get; set; }

private void executeCommandOne(string param)
{
    // Do something here.
}

private void executeCommandTwo()
{
    // Do something here.
}

3. Using Telerik EventToCommandBehavior. It's an option.

You'll have to download it's NuGet Package.

XAML:

<i:Interaction.Behaviors>
    <telerek:EventToCommandBehavior
         Command="{Binding DropCommand}"
         Event="Drop"
         PassArguments="True" />
</i:Interaction.Behaviors>

Code:

public ActionCommand<DragEventArgs> DropCommand { get; private set; }

this.DropCommand = new ActionCommand<DragEventArgs>(OnDrop);

private void OnDrop(DragEventArgs e)
{
    // Do Something
}
  • Does this depend on the MVVM Light Toolkit (mvvmlight.codeplex.com)? – Foo Feb 26 '15 at 18:26
  • Nope, not at all. I've been meaning to use MVVM Light but I have no use of it. This works just fine by itself. – AzzamAziz Feb 26 '15 at 18:33
  • @DavidNichols the second one depends on MVVM Light. – AzzamAziz Apr 16 '15 at 1:22
  • 2
    Using option 1 here just simplifies life incredibly. I disagree with "Using MVVMLight [is the m]ost difficult but best practice." If it adds extra complexity, and MS has already-included MVVM functionality that maintains separation of concerns, why add in 2 more packages if you don't have to? – Conrad Aug 29 '16 at 13:50
12

I know this is a fairly old question, but I ran into the same problem today and wasn't too interested in referencing all of MVVMLight just so I can use event triggers with event args. I have used MVVMLight in the past and it's a great framework, but I just don't want to use it for my projects any more.

What I did to resolve this problem was create an ULTRA minimal, EXTREMELY adaptable custom trigger action that would allow me to bind to the command and provide an event args converter to pass on the args to the command's CanExecute and Execute functions. You don't want to pass the event args verbatim, as that would result in view layer types being sent to the view model layer (which should never happen in MVVM).

Here is the EventCommandExecuter class I came up with:

public class EventCommandExecuter : TriggerAction<DependencyObject>
{
    #region Constructors

    public EventCommandExecuter()
        : this(CultureInfo.CurrentCulture)
    {
    }

    public EventCommandExecuter(CultureInfo culture)
    {
        Culture = culture;
    }

    #endregion

    #region Properties

    #region Command

    public ICommand Command
    {
        get { return (ICommand)GetValue(CommandProperty); }
        set { SetValue(CommandProperty, value); }
    }

    public static readonly DependencyProperty CommandProperty =
        DependencyProperty.Register("Command", typeof(ICommand), typeof(EventCommandExecuter), new PropertyMetadata(null));

    #endregion

    #region EventArgsConverterParameter

    public object EventArgsConverterParameter
    {
        get { return (object)GetValue(EventArgsConverterParameterProperty); }
        set { SetValue(EventArgsConverterParameterProperty, value); }
    }

    public static readonly DependencyProperty EventArgsConverterParameterProperty =
        DependencyProperty.Register("EventArgsConverterParameter", typeof(object), typeof(EventCommandExecuter), new PropertyMetadata(null));

    #endregion

    public IValueConverter EventArgsConverter { get; set; }

    public CultureInfo Culture { get; set; }

    #endregion

    protected override void Invoke(object parameter)
    {
        var cmd = Command;

        if (cmd != null)
        {
            var param = parameter;

            if (EventArgsConverter != null)
            {
                param = EventArgsConverter.Convert(parameter, typeof(object), EventArgsConverterParameter, CultureInfo.InvariantCulture);
            }

            if (cmd.CanExecute(param))
            {
                cmd.Execute(param);
            }
        }
    }
}

This class has two dependency properties, one to allow binding to your view model's command, the other allows you to bind the source of the event if you need it during event args conversion. You can also provide culture settings if you need to (they default to the current UI culture).

This class allows you to adapt the event args so that they may be consumed by your view model's command logic. However, if you want to just pass the event args on verbatim, simply don't specify an event args converter.

The simplest usage of this trigger action in XAML is as follows:

<i:Interaction.Triggers>
    <i:EventTrigger EventName="NameChanged">
        <cmd:EventCommandExecuter Command="{Binding Path=Update, Mode=OneTime}" EventArgsConverter="{x:Static c:NameChangedArgsToStringConverter.Default}"/>
    </i:EventTrigger>
</i:Interaction.Triggers>

If you needed access to the source of the event, you would bind to the owner of the event

<i:Interaction.Triggers>
    <i:EventTrigger EventName="NameChanged">
        <cmd:EventCommandExecuter 
            Command="{Binding Path=Update, Mode=OneTime}" 
            EventArgsConverter="{x:Static c:NameChangedArgsToStringConverter.Default}"
            EventArgsConverterParameter="{Binding ElementName=SomeEventSource, Mode=OneTime}"/>
    </i:EventTrigger>
</i:Interaction.Triggers>

(this assumes that the XAML node you're attaching the triggers to has been assigned x:Name="SomeEventSource"

This XAML relies on importing some required namespaces

xmlns:cmd="clr-namespace:MyProject.WPF.Commands"
xmlns:c="clr-namespace:MyProject.WPF.Converters"
xmlns:i="clr-namespace:System.Windows.Interactivity;assembly=System.Windows.Interactivity"

and creating an IValueConverter (called NameChangedArgsToStringConverter in this case) to handle the actual conversion logic. For basic converters I usually create a default static readonly converter instance, which I can then reference directly in XAML as I have done above.

The benefit of this solution is that you really only need to add a single class to any project to use the interaction framework much the same way that you would use it with InvokeCommandAction. Adding a single class (of about 75 lines) should be much more preferable to an entire library to accomplish identical results.

NOTE

this is somewhat similar to the answer from @adabyron but it uses event triggers instead of behaviours. This solution also provides an event args conversion ability, not that @adabyron's solution could not do this as well. I really don't have any good reason why I prefer triggers to behaviours, just a personal choice. IMO either strategy is a reasonable choice.

  • Perfect solution for me. Awesome. – damccull Dec 2 '14 at 20:00
11

For people just finding this post, you should know that in newer versions (not sure on the exact version since official docs are slim on this topic) the default behavior of the InvokeCommandAction, if no CommandParameter is specified, is to pass the args of the event it's attached to as the CommandParameter. So the originals poster's XAML could be simply written as:

<i:Interaction.Triggers>
  <i:EventTrigger EventName="Navigated">
    <i:InvokeCommandAction Command="{Binding NavigatedEvent}"/>
  </i:EventTrigger>
</i:Interaction.Triggers>

Then in your command, you can accept a parameter of type NavigationEventArgs (or whatever event args type is appropriate) and it will automatically be provided.

  • 3
    Hey, it doesn't seem to work that way. Hmm, that would have been too easy. :) – Pompair Jan 1 '16 at 10:44
  • 1
    I used this technique for a Windows 10 UWP app, not sure where all it works this way. – joshb Jan 2 '16 at 17:41
  • 4
    It works for Prism InvokeCommandAction msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/… – Anton Shakalo Aug 30 '16 at 14:40
  • You definitely need Prism for that behavior. – IgorMF Jul 9 '17 at 16:30
  • Once again, Prism rocks. Plus, again, I should’ve gone to the manual before browsing the web. Thank you! – Informagic Feb 8 at 8:31
5

To add to what joshb has stated already - this works just fine for me. Make sure to add references to Microsoft.Expression.Interactions.dll and System.Windows.Interactivity.dll and in your xaml do:

    xmlns:i="http://schemas.microsoft.com/expression/2010/interactivity"

I ended up using something like this for my needs. This shows that you can also pass a custom parameter:

<i:Interaction.Triggers>
            <i:EventTrigger EventName="SelectionChanged">

                <i:InvokeCommandAction Command="{Binding Path=DataContext.RowSelectedItem, RelativeSource={RelativeSource AncestorType={x:Type Window}}}" 
                                       CommandParameter="{Binding Path=SelectedItem, RelativeSource={RelativeSource Mode=FindAncestor, AncestorType=DataGrid}}" />
            </i:EventTrigger>
</i:Interaction.Triggers>
  • This works beautifully when the parameter you want can be accessed through binding (OP wanted the EventArgs), and requires nothing else but the Interactivity namespace. Explicitly specifying the binding between CommandParameter and the element's SelectedItem was key for me, because I had tried just entering the string "SelectedItem", which of course didn't work. Cheers! – Paul Oct 10 '17 at 17:37
3

I don't think you can do that easily with the InvokeCommandAction - I would take a look at EventToCommand from MVVMLight or similar.

1

With Behaviors and Actions in Blend for Visual Studio 2013 you can use the InvokeCommandAction. I tried this with the Drop event and although no CommandParameter was specified in the XAML, to my surprise, the Execute Action parameter contained the DragEventArgs. I presume this would happen for other events but have not tested them.

  • 2
    Can you provide a code (XAML and VM) example of this? As described its not working for me (WPF, .NET 4.5) – Pete Stensønes Oct 7 '14 at 7:56
0

What I do is to use InvokeCommandAction to bind the control loaded event to a command in the view model, give the control a x:Name in Xaml and pass as CommandParameter, then in said loaded command hook view model handlers up to the events where I need to get the event args.

0

Here is a version of @adabyron's answer that prevents the leaky EventArgs abstraction.

First, the modified EventToCommandBehavior class (now a generic abstract class and formatted with ReSharper code cleanup). Note the new GetCommandParameter virtual method and its default implementation:

public abstract class EventToCommandBehavior<TEventArgs> : Behavior<FrameworkElement>
    where TEventArgs : EventArgs
{
    public static readonly DependencyProperty EventProperty = DependencyProperty.Register("Event", typeof(string), typeof(EventToCommandBehavior<TEventArgs>), new PropertyMetadata(null, OnEventChanged));
    public static readonly DependencyProperty CommandProperty = DependencyProperty.Register("Command", typeof(ICommand), typeof(EventToCommandBehavior<TEventArgs>), new PropertyMetadata(null));
    public static readonly DependencyProperty PassArgumentsProperty = DependencyProperty.Register("PassArguments", typeof(bool), typeof(EventToCommandBehavior<TEventArgs>), new PropertyMetadata(false));
    private Delegate _handler;
    private EventInfo _oldEvent;

    public string Event
    {
        get { return (string)GetValue(EventProperty); }
        set { SetValue(EventProperty, value); }
    }

    public ICommand Command
    {
        get { return (ICommand)GetValue(CommandProperty); }
        set { SetValue(CommandProperty, value); }
    }

    public bool PassArguments
    {
        get { return (bool)GetValue(PassArgumentsProperty); }
        set { SetValue(PassArgumentsProperty, value); }
    }

    protected override void OnAttached()
    {
        AttachHandler(Event);
    }

    protected virtual object GetCommandParameter(TEventArgs e)
    {
        return e;
    }

    private void AttachHandler(string eventName)
    {
        _oldEvent?.RemoveEventHandler(AssociatedObject, _handler);

        if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(eventName))
        {
            return;
        }

        EventInfo eventInfo = AssociatedObject.GetType().GetEvent(eventName);

        if (eventInfo != null)
        {
            MethodInfo methodInfo = typeof(EventToCommandBehavior<TEventArgs>).GetMethod("ExecuteCommand", BindingFlags.Instance | BindingFlags.NonPublic);

            _handler = Delegate.CreateDelegate(eventInfo.EventHandlerType, this, methodInfo);
            eventInfo.AddEventHandler(AssociatedObject, _handler);
            _oldEvent = eventInfo;
        }
        else
        {
            throw new ArgumentException($"The event '{eventName}' was not found on type '{AssociatedObject.GetType().FullName}'.");
        }
    }

    private static void OnEventChanged(DependencyObject d, DependencyPropertyChangedEventArgs e)
    {
        var behavior = (EventToCommandBehavior<TEventArgs>)d;

        if (behavior.AssociatedObject != null)
        {
            behavior.AttachHandler((string)e.NewValue);
        }
    }

    // ReSharper disable once UnusedMember.Local
    // ReSharper disable once UnusedParameter.Local
    private void ExecuteCommand(object sender, TEventArgs e)
    {
        object parameter = PassArguments ? GetCommandParameter(e) : null;

        if (Command?.CanExecute(parameter) == true)
        {
            Command.Execute(parameter);
        }
    }
}

Next, an example derived class that hides DragCompletedEventArgs. Some people expressed concern about leaking the EventArgs abstraction into their view model assembly. To prevent this, I created an interface that represents the values we care about. The interface can live in the view model assembly with the private implementation in the UI assembly:

// UI assembly
public class DragCompletedBehavior : EventToCommandBehavior<DragCompletedEventArgs>
{
    protected override object GetCommandParameter(DragCompletedEventArgs e)
    {
        return new DragCompletedArgs(e);
    }

    private class DragCompletedArgs : IDragCompletedArgs
    {
        public DragCompletedArgs(DragCompletedEventArgs e)
        {
            Canceled = e.Canceled;
            HorizontalChange = e.HorizontalChange;
            VerticalChange = e.VerticalChange;
        }

        public bool Canceled { get; }
        public double HorizontalChange { get; }
        public double VerticalChange { get; }
    }
}

// View model assembly
public interface IDragCompletedArgs
{
    bool Canceled { get; }
    double HorizontalChange { get; }
    double VerticalChange { get; }
}

Cast the command parameter to IDragCompletedArgs, similar to @adabyron's answer.

0

As an adaption of @Mike Fuchs answer, here's an even smaller solution. I'm using the Fody.AutoDependencyPropertyMarker to reduce some of the boiler plate.

The Class

public class EventCommand : TriggerAction<DependencyObject>
{
    [AutoDependencyProperty]
    public ICommand Command { get; set; }

    protected override void Invoke(object parameter)
    {
        if (Command != null)
        {
            if (Command.CanExecute(parameter))
            {
                Command.Execute(parameter);
            }
        }
    }
}

The EventArgs

public class VisibleBoundsArgs : EventArgs
{
    public Rect VisibleVounds { get; }

    public VisibleBoundsArgs(Rect visibleBounds)
    {
        VisibleVounds = visibleBounds;
    }
}

The XAML

<local:ZoomableImage>
   <i:Interaction.Triggers>
      <i:EventTrigger EventName="VisibleBoundsChanged" >
         <local:EventCommand Command="{Binding VisibleBoundsChanged}" />
      </i:EventTrigger>
   </i:Interaction.Triggers>
</local:ZoomableImage>

The ViewModel

public ICommand VisibleBoundsChanged => _visibleBoundsChanged ??
                                        (_visibleBoundsChanged = new RelayCommand(obj => SetVisibleBounds(((VisibleBoundsArgs)obj).VisibleVounds)));
0

Prism's InvokeCommandAction will pass the event args by default if CommandParameter is not set.

https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/previous-versions/msp-n-p/gg405494(v=pandp.40)#passing-eventargs-parameters-to-the-command

Here is an example. Note the use of prism:InvokeCommandAction instead of i:InvokeCommandAction.

<i:Interaction.Triggers>
    <i:EventTrigger EventName="Sorting">
        <prism:InvokeCommandAction Command="{Binding SortingCommand}"/>
    </i:EventTrigger>
</i:Interaction.Triggers>

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