1

Ok heres some code.

#include <iostream>
#include <deque>
using namespace std;
class A
{
public:
    virtual void Execute()
    {
        cout << "Hello from class A" << endl;
    }
};
class B: public A
{
public:
    void Execute()
    {
        cout << "Hello from class B" << endl;
    }
};
void Main()
{
    deque<A *> aclasses = deque<A*>(0);
    deque<A *> aclasses2 = deque<A*>(0);
    A a1 = A();
    B b1 = B();
    aclasses.push_back(&a1);
    aclasses.push_back(&b1);
    aclasses[0]->Execute();
    aclasses[1]->Execute();

    //Now say I want to copy a class from aclasses to aclasses2
    //while perserving it's identity and making it a seperate entity, without
    //knowing the exact type it is.

    aclasses2.push_back(new A(*aclasses[0]));
    aclasses2.push_back(new A(*aclasses[1]));
    //Now my problem show itself
    for each(A * a in aclasses2)
        a->Execute();
    //Execute is called from the original class A both times.

}

Now you might say, why don't you just put the pointers from the first deque into the second deque? While I could but I need the data to be independent. Basically I want to be able to clone items from the first deque while preserving there identity and giving them there own data.

Now the current modified version

#include <iostream>
#include <deque>
using namespace std;
class A
{
public:
    virtual void Execute()
    {
        cout << "Hello from class A" << endl;
    }
    virtual ~A() {}             // don't forget the virtual destructor
    virtual A* clone() const {
       return new A(*this);
    }
};
class B: public A
{
public:
    void Execute()
    {
        cout << "Hello from class B" << endl;
    }
    virtual B* clone() {     // return type is co-variant
       return new B( *this );
    }
};
void MainRUNNER()
{
    deque<A *> aclasses = deque<A*>(0);
    deque<A *> aclasses2 = deque<A*>(0);
    A a1 = A();
    B b1 = B();
    aclasses.push_back(&a1);
    aclasses.push_back(&b1);
    aclasses[0]->Execute();
    aclasses[1]->Execute();

    //Now say I want to copy a class from aclasses to aclasses2
    //while perserving it's identity and making it a seperate entity, without
    //knowing the exact type it is.

    aclasses2.push_back(aclasses[0]->clone());
    aclasses2.push_back(aclasses[1]->clone());
    //Now my problem show itself
    for each(A * a in aclasses2)
        a->Execute();
    //Execute is called from the original class A both times.
}
  • 6
    void Main => int main. – Konrad Rudolph Jun 1 '11 at 20:05
  • 4
    I don't see abstract classes here (: – Kiril Kirov Jun 1 '11 at 20:06
  • Why you create the deque-s with pointers? Is there some reason for this? As you want to copy the elements, just use deque< A > or deque< B > – Kiril Kirov Jun 1 '11 at 20:09
  • The deques contain objects, not classes. An object is an instance of a class – dario_ramos Jun 1 '11 at 20:11
  • 1
    Duplicate of stackoverflow.com/questions/5148706/… – doron Jun 1 '11 at 20:24
10

The common pattern for handling that is through a virtual clone() method in the base class that will create a new object of the appropriate type:

struct base {
    virtual ~base() {}             // don't forget the virtual destructor
    virtual base* clone() const { 
       return new base(*this); 
    }
};
struct derived : base {
    virtual derived* clone() const {     // return type is co-variant
       return new derived( *this );
    }
};
int main() {
   std::auto_ptr<base> b1( new derived );
   std::auto_ptr<base> b2( b1->clone() ); // will create a derived object
}
  • I'd upvote this again, if I could, for remembering to make the destructor virtual. – David Thornley Jun 1 '11 at 20:15
  • If this works you saved me rewriting damn near a whole project. Funny thing is is I came up with the same idea, to create a virtual clone function, didn't seem to work though, I don't remember why. Only differences I see are the virtual destructor. – Kelly Elton Jun 1 '11 at 20:20
  • @kelton52: The virtual destructor is only needed for destruction of the objects in the container. Also note that it is important to know who is responsible for the deallocation of the objects if they are dynamically allocated, and that means that it is usually a bad idea to mix pointers to stack allocated objects with pointers to dynamically allocated ones... – David Rodríguez - dribeas Jun 1 '11 at 20:52
  • Is there anything else I should know? Can I inline all of these functions? – Kelly Elton Jun 1 '11 at 20:57
  • There is no reason not to inline those functions, but if you are going to call them polymorphically (as is the main purpose) whether they are declared inline or not the call will not be inlined by the compiler, as it needs to use the dynamic dispatch mechanism, i.e. the compiler does not know which of the functions it needs to call. – David Rodríguez - dribeas Jun 1 '11 at 21:19
3

You need to provide a virtual copy constructor – usually this is a method called clone – which is overridden in each class to return the correct type:

class A {
    virtual A* clone() {
        return new A();
    }
};

class B : public A {
    void A* clone() {
        return new B();
    }
};

The methods can of course be arbitrarily complex in order to copy the whole state.

Of course, this leaks rather a lot of memory. Use appropriate smart pointers instead of raw pointers (e.g. std::shared_ptr if your compiler supports it, boost::shared_ptr otherwise).

  • You can't make a vector or deque out of shared_ptr's, but I am implementing linked_ptrs in my actual code. – Kelly Elton Jun 1 '11 at 21:51
  • @kelton52 Of course you can. Why shouldn’t you? – Konrad Rudolph Jun 2 '11 at 9:31
1

You have new A(...) way down there. What gets called is A's copy constructor (created implicitly by the compiler.

What you want is a clone method. See here. It recaps the appropriate item from the excellent C++ Coding Standards book. Below is a shameless copy of the final solution, which also shows a nice use of the NVI idiom to avoid the slicing problem.

class A {// …
public:
  A* Clone() const {                        // nonvirtual
    A* p = DoClone();
    assert( typeid(*p) == typeid(*this) && "DoClone incorrectly overridden" );
    return p;                                // check DoClone's returned type
  }

protected:
 A( const A& );
 virtual A* DoClone() const = 0;
};

class B : public A { // …
public:
  virtual B* Clone() const {return new B(*this); }

protected:
  B( const B& rhs ) : A( rhs ) {/* … */}
};

update A bit of an explanation. The basic idea of the clone is the same as the other excellent answers here.

Now, with cloning you have the danger of slicing objects. For example, if some object which derives from A forgets to implement its own clone method, then a call to A* a = d->clone() will not return a full D object (assuming D is a descendant of A)

The NVI idiom says to separate a public interface from a virtual interface. Thus, in this example, clone is public, but not virtual. It call a protected virtual method, doClone, which does the actual cloning, and which derived objects also implement. Because of the split, the clone method can verify that the type of the cloned object matches the type of the original object.

  • I feel like this is the right answer, but I have no idea what's going on here. – Kelly Elton Jun 1 '11 at 21:54
  • Could you please explain how NVI avoids slicing? Of ourse using NVI is good for other reasons but I don’t think it helps with slicing. – Konrad Rudolph Jun 2 '11 at 9:35
  • Using the NVI idiom, the base class's clone can perform actions before/after the virtual clone operation. In this example, it perform a (runtime) check that the derived class remembered to implement the clone method. If used with David's initial solution, then the assert would have caught that the derived class didn't implement the correct clone method (i.e. const). – Gilad Naor Jun 2 '11 at 10:07
  • @kelton52 for the full background, see some of the links. I will modify the answer to explain it briefly. – Gilad Naor Jun 2 '11 at 10:10
  • @Konrad also should mention that the copy ctor is not public. The assignment operation should also be non-public. Thus, if I'm not mistaken, slicing can only occur if a derived object forgets to implement the clone method. (or, if the cctor & operator= are protected, a derived object can misuse them) – Gilad Naor Jun 2 '11 at 10:20
-1

I think you confuse classes with objects, i.e. instances of those classes.

Your container aclasses store pointers to existing objects. You may take the same pointer and push it several times in many different containers, this is not called cloning.

  • 2
    Except that this is explicitly what the OP doesn't want to do. – David Thornley Jun 1 '11 at 20:14

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