3

I was going through the polyfill of Array.isArray method on MDN, and this is what I found:

if (!Array.isArray) {
  Array.isArray = function(arg) {
    return Object.prototype.toString.call(arg) === '[object Array]';
  };
}

While this works, I wonder why MDN hasn't listed the following as the polyfill for isArray?

if (!Array.isArray) {
  Array.isArray = function(arg) {
    return arg.constructor === Array;
  };
}

Above code is a bit short and simpler. I wonder if there is any advantage of using MDN's implementation as compared to above one?

9
  • 2
    If you get an object from an iframe, for example it's going to be an array but it will not be created from your current Array constructor, so that check will fail. – VLAZ May 28 '20 at 20:50
  • @VLAZ: Didn't quite get that. Why should an object/Array from an iFrame be any different? Can you demonstrate with code what you are trying to say? – darKnight May 28 '20 at 20:52
  • It's an array but comes from a different environment. The constructor function is a different instance of Array. And as we know function() {} === function() {} is false. – VLAZ May 28 '20 at 20:53
  • Does this answer your question? Difference between using Array.isArray and instanceof Array – VLAZ May 28 '20 at 20:58
  • instanceof Array is pretty much compatible with your suggested == Array. The same problems arise - it fails cross-environment, as you'd be trying to compare different instances of Array. This answer talks about the problem directly. – VLAZ May 28 '20 at 21:00
1

The most important reason that makes the MDN pollyfill a safe one to use is that an array is an exotic object, knowing that the best way to differentiate an exotic object would be through the use of an exotic feature related to that object - that is to say an exotic property of the exotic object.

If u look at the specification of the Object.prototype.toString method, you will find that it uses the abstract operation isArray, which checks for exotic array objects.

On the other hand look at the specification of the constructor property, it is not an exotic property of the array, and so javascript code can change it easily

const x = [];
x.constructor = Object

Infact the constructor property is more intended for meta programming, you could - in es5 - create subclasses without touching the constructor property.

Now here are things that can go wrong with your implementation

const customIsArray = function(arg) {
    return arg.constructor === Array;
};

// 1 wont work with subclasses of Array
class CustomArray extends Array {

}

const customArray = new CustomArray();
customIsArray(customArray) // false
Array.isArray(customArray) // true

// 2 wont work across different realms ( iframes, web workers, service workers ... if we are speaking about the browser environment)

const iframe = document.createElement('iframe')
document.body.appendChild(iframe)
const IframeArray = iframe.contentWindow.Array;
const iframeArray = new IframeArray();
customIsArray(customArray) // false
Array.isArray(customArray) // true

// 3 wont work with few edge cases like (customIsArray will return true for both, while Array.isArray will return false
{ __proto__: Array.prototype }
{ constructor: Array }


0

One problem would be that a non-array object with a constructor property of Array would pass when it shouldn't:

// Bad polyfill, do not use
Array.isArray = function(arg) {
  return arg.constructor === Array;
};

const badObj = {};
badObj.constructor = Array;
console.log(Array.isArray(badObj));

The above would be a very strange situation, but a polyfill must be as spec-compliant as possible, even if it requires more convoluted code.

4
  • Couldn't you also add a toString() method that returns [object Array] and misleads the MDN polyfill? – Barmar May 28 '20 at 20:46
  • 2
    It's probably not possible to make it deal with code that's deliberately trying to mislead it. – Barmar May 28 '20 at 20:46
  • You could, but if the built-in methods are monkeypatched to be inaccurate, all bets are off the table anyway. Many otherwise spec-compliant polyfills could be broken that way. – CertainPerformance May 28 '20 at 20:47
  • 1
    @Barmar yes, you could. But MDN's polyfill doesn't use badObj's toString, it uses Object.prototype.toString. I guess someone could deliberately mess up the standard objects, but that's a somewhat bizarre corner case you can guard yourself against. – mbojko May 28 '20 at 20:52

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