87
public string Source
{
    get
    {
        /*
        if ( Source == null ){
            return string . Empty;
        } else {
            return Source;
        }
        */
        return Source ?? string.Empty;
    }
    set
    {
        /*
        if ( Source == null ) {
            Source = string . Empty;
        } else {
            if ( Source == value ) {
                Source = Source;
            } else {
                Source = value;
            }
        }
        */
        Source == value ? Source : value ?? string.Empty;
        RaisePropertyChanged ( "Source" );
    }
}

Can I use ?: ?? operators EXACTLY as If/Else?


My Question :
How to write the following with ?: ?? operators

[ 1 ]

if ( Source == null ){
    // Return Nothing
} else {
    return Source;
}

[ 2 ]

if ( Source == value ){
    // Do Nothing
} else {
    Source = value;
    RaisePropertyChanged ( "Source" );
} 

Briefly : How to do nothing, return nothing and do multiple instructions with ?: ?? operator?

5
  • 1
    It will not behave the same however. By not using conditional if/else branching, you are unconditionally (and unnecessarily) reassigning the variable every time you access it. That can go bad very quickly, especially if you have multi-threaded code. Just don't do it. Commented Jun 1, 2011 at 21:44
  • 1
    You'll have a endless/recursive call if the Source property's get accessor is returning the Source property (its get accessor).
    – John K
    Commented Jun 1, 2011 at 21:44
  • 1
    Your first code snippet has a property getter that calls its own setter, which in turn recursively calls its own getter. You lost me there, as there's no way something like that would possibly work in the field. Please refine your question and explain exactly what you want to achieve. Commented Jun 1, 2011 at 21:45
  • Return Nothing? That's VB. You're writing c# here.
    – Task
    Commented May 6, 2014 at 19:15
  • @Task I mean how to do so, this line is a comment for the question Commented Jun 29, 2014 at 8:51

9 Answers 9

207

For [1], you can't: these operators are made to return a value, not perform operations.

The expression

a ? b : c

evaluates to b if a is true and evaluates to c if a is false.

The expression

b ?? c

evaluates to b if b is not null and evaluates to c if b is null.

If you write

return a ? b : c;

or

return b ?? c;

they will always return something.

For [2], you can write a function that returns the right value that performs your "multiple operations", but that's probably worse than just using if/else.

1
  • All true. But I do keep being tempted by: set => _ = value ? _flags |= Flags.Foo : _flags &= ~Flags.Foo; instead of set { if (value) { _flags |= Flags.Foo; } else { _flags &= ~Flags.Foo; } } Commented Jun 18, 2023 at 3:42
43

The ternary operator (?:) is not designed for control flow, it's only designed for conditional assignment. If you need to control the flow of your program, use a control structure, such as if/else.

3
  • 5
    I'll add that I have seen people use nested ternary expressions in place of if/else and it produces code that is difficult to read, and debug. Bad mojo all around.
    – ckramer
    Commented Jun 1, 2011 at 21:48
  • 4
    Sometimes nested ternary operators produce more readable code, if whitespace is used properly. Commented Jun 1, 2011 at 21:58
  • 3
    @truth: Yes, I have nothing against nested ?: per se. But I have a big problem with them being used for control flow, and especially nested control flow! Commented Jun 1, 2011 at 22:00
13

Refering to ?: Operator (C# Reference)

The conditional operator (?:) returns one of two values depending on the value of a Boolean expression. Following is the syntax for the conditional operator.

Refering to ?? Operator (C# Reference)

The ?? operator is called the null-coalescing operator and is used to define a default value for a nullable value types as well as reference types. It returns the left-hand operand if it is not null; otherwise it returns the right operand.

That means:

[Part 1]

return source ?? String.Empty;

[Part 2] is not applicable ...

3
  • 3
    That's different from doing nothing. It returns an empty string. Commented Jun 1, 2011 at 21:56
  • 1
    Sure, but that's not what the OP asked for. It's not my fault that the OP asked to "return nothing" -- whatever that can possibly mean. Commented Jun 1, 2011 at 22:06
  • 1
    @trutheality: No body said it is your fault .. However, the OP wanted to return nothing and that what I've provided. Commented Jun 1, 2011 at 22:10
4

The ternary operator RETURNS one of two values. Or, it can execute one of two statements based on its condition, but that's generally not a good idea, as it can lead to unintended side-effects.

bar ? () : baz();

In this case, the () does nothing, while baz does something. But you've only made the code less clear. I'd go for more verbose code that's clearer and easier to maintain.

Further, this makes little sense at all:

var foo = bar ? () : baz();

since () has no return type (it's void) and baz has a return type that's unknown at the point of call in this sample. If they don't agree, the compiler will complain, and loudly.

3

The "do nothing" doesn't really work for ?

if by // Return Nothing you actually mean return null then write

return Source;

if you mean, ignore the codepath then write

 if ( Source != null )
            {
                return Source;
            }
// source is null so continue on.

And for the last

 if ( Source != value )
            { Source = value;
                RaisePropertyChanged ( "Source" );
            }

// nothing done.
3

If you are concerned with the verbosity of your code I would write this rather than trying to abuse expressions.

if (Source == value) return;
Source = value;
RaisePropertyChanged("Source");
1
  • 1
    I'm not abusing expressions, I'm just thinking! Commented Jun 29, 2014 at 8:56
2

the ?: is the itinerary operator. (believe i spelled that properly) and it's simple to use. as in a boolean predicate ? iftrue : ifalse; But you must have a rvalue/lvalue as in rvalue = predicate ? iftrue: iffalse;

ex int i = x < 7 ? x : 7;

if x was less than 7, i would get assigned x, if not i would be 7.

you can also use it in a return, as in return x < 7 ? x : 7;

again, as above , this would have the same affect.

so, Source = Source == value ? Source : string.Empty; i believe is what your trying to acheive.

2
  • 6
    I like it. The itinerary operator: it helps you get from A to B ... or from A to C ... depending on A. Commented Jun 1, 2011 at 21:51
  • Yes, he means ternary. But the correct name is "conditional". Commented Jun 3, 2016 at 17:22
2

The ?: Operator returns one of two values depending on the value of a Boolean expression.

Condition-Expression ? Expression1 : Expression2

Find here more on ?: operator, also know as a Ternary Operator:

0

I don't think you can its an operator and its suppose to return one or the other. It's not if else statement replacement although it can be use for that on certain case.

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