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I have a producer/consumer type multiprocessing pipeline on hundreds of millions of items that works fine (in a very simplified form with some pseudocode) as follows:

from multiprocessing import Process, Manager

def process(batch):
  for thing in batch:
    result_things = []
    for a, b in some_func(thing): # a and b are reasonably short strings
      result_things.append(dict(a=a, b=b))
    yield result_things
  return

STOP_MSG = 'STOP!'
def wrapped_process(q_in, q_out):
  msg = q_in.get()
  while msg != STOP_MSG:
    for result_things in process(msg):
      q_out.put(result_things)
    msg = q_in.get()
  q_out.put(STOP_MSG)
  return

def main():
  num_workers = 20
  mgr = Manager()
  q_worker = mgr.Queue()
  q_master = mgr.Queue()
  for batch in source_of_data:
    q_master.put(batch)
  agents = []
  for i in range(num_workers):
    p = Process(
      target=wrapped_process,
      kwargs=dict(
        q_in=q_master, q_out=q_worker))
    agents.append(p)
  for p in agents:
    p.start()

  stop_msg_count = 0
  while stop_msg_count < num_workers:
    msg = q_worker.get()
    if msg == STOP_MSG:
      stop_msg_count += 1
    else:
      result_things = msg
      add_to_db(result_things)

The above works fine without ever exceeding 10GB total according to the job handler on our servers.

I decided to do some OOP and created a simple class where the dictionary used to be, like so:

class Result:
  def __init__(self, a, b):
    self.a = a
    self.b = b

def process(batch):
  for thing in batch:
    result_things = []
    for a, b in some_func(thing): 
      result_things.append(Result(a=a, b=b)) # instead of a dict, I now use the Result class
    yield result_things
  return

This resulted in my jobs getting killed due to overuse of memory, and even after I requested 100GB, these jobs would die.

It took me a while to figure out that it was actually the new class that was creating the memory issues since I never thought such an innocuous change could trigger memory problems.

And I confirmed the new class was the problem because the following change fixed it (rather than reverting to the dictionary):


def wrapped_process(q_in, q_out):
  msg = q_in.get()
  while msg != STOP_MSG:
    for result_things in process(msg):
      q_out.put(result_things)
      for result in result_things:
        del result     # explicit deallocation of the simple objects
    msg = q_in.get()
  q_out.put(STOP_MSG)
  return

Why is python not garbage collecting the results when, at least according to https://stackoverflow.com/a/36729375/614684, it should, even with Queues.

And is there a better, more standard way to do the above than to either restrict oneself to built in structures or manual memory management?

I am using Python 3.6.2, if it matters.

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