27

Given the following code:

using System;

class MyClass
{
    public MyClass x;
}

public static class Program
{
    public static void Main()
    {
        var a = new MyClass();
        var b = new MyClass();
        a.x = (a = b);
        Console.WriteLine(a.x == a);
    }
}

The first two lines are very obvious, just two different objects.

I assume the third line to do the following:

  • The part (a = b) assigns b to a and returns b, so now a equals b.
  • Then, a.x is assigned to b.

That means, a.x equals to b, and also b equals to a. Which implies that a.x equals to a.

However, the code prints False.

What's going on?

  • Have a look at sharplab for details under the hood – Pavel Anikhouski May 29 at 19:34
  • 2
    @PavelAnikhouski you have a type on a.x == b instead of a.x == a – misha130 May 29 at 19:43
  • 2
    @jdweng OP knows that, they were expecting a.x to reference b, but it's isn't, that's what they are asking. – Magnetron May 29 at 19:56
  • 3
    Possibly interesting sidenote: C# evaluates the LHS of an assignment before the RHS; but C++ (since C++17) evaluates the RHS before the LHS! My blog post might be interesting even to a C# programmer if you skip all the crazy variadic-template stuff: quuxplusone.github.io/blog/2020/05/07/… Both C# and C++ distinguish "order of evaluation" from "order of operations" (precedence). – Quuxplusone May 30 at 17:10
  • 2
    @Quuxplusone Because it does look useful and relevant, I took the liberty of editing your comment to change that pronoun "This" to "My", in accordance with our disclosure requirements to avoid the appearance of improper self-promotion. Please adjust any future comments or answers that refer to your blog accordingly. Thanks! – Cody Gray May 31 at 0:17
21
0

It happens because you're trying to update a twice in the same statement. a in a.x= refers to the old instance. So, you're updating a to reference b and the old a object field x to reference b.

You can confirm with this:

void Main()
{
    var a = new MyClass(){s="a"};
    var b = new MyClass() {s="b"};
    var c =a;

    a.x = (a=b);
    Console.WriteLine($"a is {a.s}");
    Console.WriteLine(a.x == b);

    Console.WriteLine($"c is {c.s}");       
    Console.WriteLine(c.x == b);
}

class MyClass
{
    public MyClass x;
    public string s;
}

The answer will be:

a is b
False
c is a
True

Edit: Just to make a little bit more clear, It's not about the operators' execution order, it's because of the two updates in the same variable in the same statement. The assigment (a=b) is executed before the a.x=, but it doesn't matter, because a.x is referencing the old instance, not the newly updated one. This happens, as @Joe Sewell answer explains, because evaluation, to find the assignment target, is left to right.

| improve this answer | |
  • 12
    But it is about execution order. First the left hand side is evaluated/executed, which uses the old a, then the right hand side is, which updates a but does not change the target of the pending =, which has already been fixed. You can more clearly see the left to right execution in something like c[a += b] += a. – HTNW May 30 at 4:08
  • @HTNW, yeah, I was talking about execution order of both =, should've made that clearer. After all, to know that a.x points to the old object, it must had been evaluated first. – Magnetron May 31 at 1:28
17
0

In a.x = (a = b), the left hand side a.x is evaluated first to find the assignment target, then the right hand side is evaluated.

This was also surprising to me, because I intuitively think it starts on the rightmost side and evaluates leftward, but this is not the case. (The associativity is right-to-left, meaning the parentheses in this case are not needed.)

Here's the specification calling out the order things happen in, with the relevant bits quoted below:

The run-time processing of a simple assignment of the form x = y consists of the following steps:

  • If x is classified as a variable:
    • x is evaluated to produce the variable.
    • y is evaluated and, if required, converted to the type of x through an implicit conversion.
    • [...]
    • The value resulting from the evaluation and conversion of y is stored into the location given by the evaluation of x.

Looking at the IL generated by the sharplab link Pavel posted:

        // stack is empty []
newobj instance void MyClass::.ctor()
        // new instance of MyClass on the heap, call it $0
        // stack -> [ref($0)]
stloc.0
        // stack -> []
        // local[0] ("a") = ref($0)
newobj instance void MyClass::.ctor()
        // new instance of MyClass on the heap, call it $1
        // stack -> [ref($1)]
stloc.1
        // stack -> []
        // local[1] ("b") = ref($1)
ldloc.0
        // stack -> [ref($0)]
ldloc.1
        // stack -> [ref($1), ref($0)]
dup
        // stack -> [ref($1), ref($1), ref($0)]
stloc.0
        // stack -> [ref($1), ref($0)]
        // local[0] ("a") = ref($1)
stfld class MyClass MyClass::x
        // stack -> []
        // $0.x = ref($1)
| improve this answer | |
8
0

Just to add some IL fun into the discussion:

The Main method header looks next way:

method private hidebysig static void
    Main() cil managed
  {
    .maxstack 3
    .locals init (
      [0] class MyClass a,
      [1] class MyClass b
    )

The a.x = (a=b); statement is translated to the next IL:

IL_000d: ldloc.0      // a
IL_000e: ldloc.1      // b
IL_000f: dup
IL_0010: stloc.0      // a
IL_0011: stfld        class MyClass::x

First two instructions load (ldloc.0, ldloc.1) onto evaluation stack references stored in a and b variables, lets call them aRef and bRef, so we have next evaluation stack state:

bRef
aRef

The dup instruction copies the current topmost value on the evaluation stack, and then pushes the copy onto the evaluation stack:

bRef
bRef
aRef

The stloc.0 pops the current value from the top of the evaluation stack and stores it in a the local variable list at index 0 (a variable is set to bRef), leaving stack in next state:

bRef
aRef

And finally stfld poppes from the stack the value (bRef) and the object reference/pointer (aRef). The value of field in the object (aRef.x) is replaced with the supplied value (bRef).

Which all result in the behavior described in the post, with both variables (a and b) pointing to the bRef with bRef.x being null and aRef.x pointing to bRef, which can be checked with extra variable containing aRef as @Magnetron suggested.

| improve this answer | |
2
0

Interesting find, I've put your code into Sharplab and checked what happens.

Seems like compiler swaps left operands in your assignment, this is what it looks like decompiled back to C# (variable names are changed):

public static void Main()
{
    MyClass myClass = new MyClass();
    MyClass x = new MyClass();
    myClass = (myClass.x = x);
    Console.WriteLine(myClass.x == myClass);
}

So what happens is a.x becomes b and then b is assigned to a. Both local variable a and attribute a.x now point to b object. So:

  • a variable points to b object
  • b variable points to b object
  • a object's x attribute points to b object
  • b object's x attribute is null

I changed your code a bit to illustrate that better:

public static void Main(string[] args)
{
    var a = new MyClass();
    var originalA = a;
    a.Name = "a";
    var b = new MyClass();
    b.Name = "b";
    a.x = (a = b);

    Console.WriteLine(a.x == a);

    Console.WriteLine("a           - " + a.Name);
    Console.WriteLine("a.x         - " + a.x?.Name);

    Console.WriteLine("b           - " + b.Name);
    Console.WriteLine("b.x         - " + b.x?.Name);

    Console.WriteLine("originalA   - " + originalA.Name);
    Console.WriteLine("originalA.x - " + originalA.x?.Name);
}

That code returns:

False
a           - b
a.x         - 
b           - b
b.x         - 
originalA   - a
originalA.x - b

Notice only originalA now points to actual a object, other local variables now point to b.

It's not a compiler bug - see Magnetron's answer.

| improve this answer | |
  • Why in the first place the compiler swaps things I don't want to? – Youssef13 May 29 at 19:48
  • I've also written the same code in Java and it prints false, which is really weird too. – Youssef13 May 29 at 19:49
  • I think it has something to do with how operator precedence works, but I don't have that knowledge... Also - don't do that :P. It doesn't seem like usual way of writing things, try to avoid complicated code like that – Daniel Bider May 29 at 19:53
  • Yes I always avoid such code. But the code just came on my hand and I couldn't figure out what's going on. So, I asked here. – Youssef13 May 29 at 19:55
  • And no, doesn't seem like operator precedence problem because I included parentheses. – Youssef13 May 29 at 19:55

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