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I am using Git Bash in Windows 10, version: git version 2.25.1.windows.1. Let me know if I need to be more specific. I am also using GitExtensions but my question is around merging from Git Bash.

When I merge from there, i.e.:

git merge feature-branch-name

it commits even though, as far as I can tell, all three of my Git config files are set otherwise. I know I can specify --no-commit in the command but I would like not to have to do that.

From the source code directory, git config --list produces the output below, where it shows three times that merge.commit=no.

diff.astextplain.textconv=astextplain
filter.lfs.clean=git-lfs clean -- %f
filter.lfs.smudge=git-lfs smudge -- %f
filter.lfs.process=git-lfs filter-process
filter.lfs.required=true
http.sslbackend=openssl
http.sslcainfo=C:/Program Files/Git/mingw64/ssl/certs/ca-bundle.crt
core.autocrlf=false
core.fscache=true
core.symlinks=false
core.editor="C:\\Program Files\\Notepad++\\notepad++.exe" -multiInst -notabbar -nosession -noPlugin
credential.helper=manager
merge.ff=no
merge.commit=no
core.editor="C:/Program Files (x86)/GitExtensions/GitExtensions.exe" fileeditor
user.email=craig@wereallconnected.ca
user.name=Craig Silver
merge.tool=winmerge
merge.ff=no
merge.commit=no
mergetool.winmerge.path=C:/Program Files (x86)/WinMerge/winmergeu.exe
mergetool.winmerge.cmd="C:/Program Files (x86)/WinMerge/winmergeu.exe" -e -u  -wl -wr -fm -dl "Mine: $LOCAL" -dm "Merged: $BASE" -dr "Theirs: $REMOTE" "$LOCAL" "$BASE" "$REMOTE" -o "$MERGED"
pull.rebase=false
fetch.prune=false
rebase.autostash=false
diff.guitool=winmerge
difftool.winmerge.path=C:/Program Files (x86)/WinMerge/winmergeu.exe
difftool.winmerge.cmd="C:/Program Files (x86)/WinMerge/winmergeu.exe" -e -u "$LOCAL" "$REMOTE"
core.repositoryformatversion=0
core.filemode=false
core.bare=false
core.logallrefupdates=true
core.ignorecase=true
core.sshcommand=ssh
merge.ff=no
merge.commit=no
submodule.active=.
remote.origin.url=REMOVED
remote.origin.fetch=+refs/heads/*:refs/remotes/origin/*
remote.origin.puttykeyfile=REMOVED
branch.master.remote=origin
branch.master.merge=refs/heads/master
branch.FMS-1203_data-structures-algorithms-string-matching.remote=origin
branch.FMS-1203_data-structures-algorithms-string-matching.merge=refs/heads/FMS-1203_data-structures-algorithms-string-matching
branch.FMS-1205_recency-trumps-frequency-for-small-fr-diff.remote=origin
branch.FMS-1205_recency-trumps-frequency-for-small-fr-diff.merge=refs/heads/FMS-1205_recency-trumps-frequency-for-small-fr-diff
branch.FMS-1204_debug-window.remote=origin
branch.FMS-1204_debug-window.merge=refs/heads/FMS-1204_debug-window

Also, git config --get merge.commit outputs no.

FYI, GitExtensions behaves correctly: merging there does not commit.

What am I missing?

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  • Could you also post a bit of tree history of the branches involved? Also be aware that git tools and plugins sometimes come with their own installation of git, separate of your system's, and it could be that your configs, as well as versions, are different. – Andrei Mustață May 30 '20 at 6:39
  • It's likely that GitExtensions doesn't simply run git merge. That is, given that GitExtensions is a GUI, it has a bunch of clicky buttons, check boxes, radio buttons, and so on. You click some clickable thingy, and it does various actions. How does it do them? That's up to it, internally. But suppose it uses the CLI for some of them. Maybe for the "merge" button, first it checks merge.commit. If that is set to no, it just runs git merge --no-commit. – torek May 30 '20 at 13:31
  • (At a guess, I would guess that in fact, it always runs git merge --no-commit internally. After that, I bet it uses git status --porcelain to read the result. If the merge has conflicts, it goes on to do conflict resolution. If not, then it checks merge.commit. This is all enabled by the fact that git config lets you invent your own arbitrary settings, so they invented their own merge.commit.) – torek May 30 '20 at 13:32
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As far as I can see - there is no merge.commit option that you can set, only merge.ff. See https://git-scm.com/docs/git-merge#_configuration.

What you can do is declare an alias that runs merge with the wanted option

git config alias.mr 'merge --no-commit'
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  • I see that now. I am guessing that GitExtensions had added merge.commit to one of my config files, because I didn't make it up. -- I didn't realize that git config --add accepts any key value input, regardless of whether Git actually uses it. Thank you, this was driving me nuts! – Craig Silver May 30 '20 at 12:13

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