76

I have always used np.arange. I recently came across np.linspace. I am wondering what exactly is the difference between them... Looking at their documentation:

np.arange:

Return evenly spaced values within a given interval.

np.linspace:

Return evenly spaced numbers over a specified interval.

The only difference I can see is linspace having more options... Like choosing to include the last element.

Which one of these two would you recommend and why? And in which cases is np.linspace superior?

4
  • 13
    arange allow you to define the size of the step. linspace allow you to define the number of steps.
    – warped
    May 30, 2020 at 17:14
  • 6
    linspace(0,1,20): 20 evenly spaced numbers from 0 to 1 (inclusive). arange(0, 10, 2): however many numbers are needed to go from 0 to 10 (exclusive) in steps of 2. May 30, 2020 at 17:16
  • 2
    The big difference is that one uses a step value, the other a count. arange follows the behavior of the python range, and is best for creating an array of integers. It's docs recommend linspace for floats.
    – hpaulj
    May 30, 2020 at 17:29
  • 1
    Its quite clear with parameter names: np.linspace(start=0,stop=1,num=5) and np.arange(start=0,stop=1,step=0.25).
    – RSW
    Sep 8, 2022 at 5:13

4 Answers 4

97

np.linspace allows you to define how many values you get including the specified min and max value. It infers the stepsize:

>>> np.linspace(0,1,11)
array([0. , 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4, 0.5, 0.6, 0.7, 0.8, 0.9, 1. ])

np.arange allows you to define the stepsize and infers the number of steps(the number of values you get).

>>> np.arange(0,1,.1)
array([0. , 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4, 0.5, 0.6, 0.7, 0.8, 0.9])

contributions from user2357112:

np.arange excludes the maximum value unless rounding error makes it do otherwise.

For example, the following results occur due to rounding error:

>>> numpy.arange(1, 1.3, 0.1)
array([1. , 1.1, 1.2, 1.3])

You can exclude the stop value (in our case 1.3) using endpoint=False:

>>> numpy.linspace(1, 1.3, 3, endpoint=False)
array([1. , 1.1, 1.2])
3
  • 5
    "It excludes the maximum value" - unless rounding error makes it do otherwise, so stick with linspace. You can specify endpoint=False if you want to exclude the right endpoint with linspace. May 31, 2020 at 6:27
  • For example, numpy.arange(1, 1.3, 0.1) gives array([1. , 1.1, 1.2, 1.3]) due to rounding error, while numpy.linspace(1, 1.3, 3, endpoint=False) gives array([1. , 1.1, 1.2]). May 31, 2020 at 6:31
  • @user2357112 agreed. See edits to my post (and feel free to edit)
    – warped
    May 31, 2020 at 6:36
6

numpy.linspace and numpy.arange can produce two variables that appear the same but aren't. This must be related to how data is stored internally. When I created ndarrays using arange, the size in the memory scaled with the number of elements. However, the ndarray created using linspace remained the same size.

from sys import getsizeof
import numpy as np
arr_lnspc5 = np.linspace(1,5,5)
arr_lnspc20 = np.linspace(1,20,20)
arr_arange5 = np.arange(1,6,1.0)
arr_arange20 = np.arange(1,21,1.0)

print(f'lnspc5   ==============')
print(f'Val: {arr_lnspc5}')
print(f'Type: {type(arr_lnspc5)}')
print(f'Size: {getsizeof(arr_lnspc5)} Bytes \n')

print(f'lnspc20  ==============')
print(f'Val: {arr_lnspc20}')
print(f'Type: {type(arr_lnspc20)}')
print(f'Size: {getsizeof(arr_lnspc20)} Bytes \n')

print(f'arange5  ==============')
print(f'Val: {arr_arange5}')
print(f'Type: {type(arr_arange5)}')
print(f'Size: {getsizeof(arr_arange5)} Bytes \n')

print(f'arange20 ==============')
print(f'Val: {arr_arange20}')
print(f'Type: {type(arr_arange20)}')
print(f'Size: {getsizeof(arr_arange20)} Bytes \n')

The output I got was:

lnspc5   ==============
Val: [1. 2. 3. 4. 5.]
Type: <class 'numpy.ndarray'>
Size: 112 Bytes 

lnspc20  ==============
Val: [ 1.  2.  3.  4.  5.  6.  7.  8.  9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20.]
Type: <class 'numpy.ndarray'>
Size: 112 Bytes 

arange5  ==============
Val: [1. 2. 3. 4. 5.]
Type: <class 'numpy.ndarray'>
Size: 152 Bytes 

arange20 ==============
Val: [ 1.  2.  3.  4.  5.  6.  7.  8.  9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20.]
Type: <class 'numpy.ndarray'>
Size: 272 Bytes 
1
  • This is incredibly important if you are concerned about scientific computing such as machine learning where you are concerned about multipling things by a learning rate and constantly updating weights. If you aren't careful about dtype of an array, you might come across the issue of overflow and get an 'NaN'. If you do any operation with an 'NaN', you get an 'NaN'. In other words, if at some point, there is an 'NaN' in the sequence of weights, the final weight is 'NaN', which could be a let down and confusing after you leave the computer running for two hours. Good point!
    – Chen Lizi
    Jun 30, 2023 at 6:16
5
np.arange(start, stop, step)
np.linspace(start,stop,number)

Example:

np.arange(0,10,2)    o/p --> array([0,2,4,6,8])
np.linspace(0,10,2)  o/p --> array([0., 10.])
0

np.arange - This is similar to built in range() function

>>> np.arange(0,5,2)
[0 2 4]

np.linpace - creates an array of defined evenly spaced value. For example, 2 values evenly spaced between 0 and 5

>>> np.linspace(0,5,2)
[0. 5.]
1
  • 1
    np.linespace just throws an attribute error because there is no such function.
    – warped
    Sep 2, 2022 at 12:07

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