2

I know this is pushing the good will of the community by presenting my least elaborate work expecting someone to come and save me but I simply have no choice with nothing to lose. I've gone through packets, files, types, flags and boxes the last few weeks but I haven't covered much of recursion. Especially not drawing with recursion. My exam is in roughly one week and I hope this is ample time to repeat and learn simple recursion tricks like that of drawing bowling pins or other patterns:

I I I I I
 I I I I
  I I I
   I I
    I
n = 5

The problem I have with recursion is that I don't quite get it. How are you supposed to approach a problem like drawing pins like this using recursion?

The closest I've come is

I I I
I I
I
n = 3

and that's using

THIS CODE NOW WORKS

with Ada.Text_IO; use Ada.Text_IO;
with Ada.Integer_Text_IO; use Ada.Integer_Text_IO;

procedure pyramidchaser is

   subtype X_Type is Integer range 0..30;
   X: X_Type;
   Indent : Integer := 0;

   procedure Numbergrabber (X : out Integer) is
   begin

      Put("Enter a number: ");
      Get(X);
      Skip_Line;
   end Numbergrabber;


   procedure PrintSpaces(I : in Integer) is
   begin 
      if I in X_Type then
      Put(" ");
      else
     return;
      end if;

      PrintSpaces(I - 1);
   end Printspaces;




   procedure PrintPins(i, n: in Integer) is
   begin
      if i >= n then 
     return;
      end if;

    Put('I');
    Put(' '); 

    PrintPins(i + 1, n);
    end Printpins;




   function Pins (X, Indent: in Integer) return Integer is

      Printed : Integer;

   begin

      Printed:= 0;
      if X > 0 then
     PrintSpaces(Indent);
     PrintPins(0, X);
     New_Line; 

     Printed := X + Pins(X - 1, Indent + 1);
      end if;
      return Printed;

   end Pins;

   Bowlingpins : Integer;

begin

   Numbergrabber(X);
   Bowlingpins:= Pins(X, Indent);

end pyramidchaser;




but with that I throw in a sum I dont really need just to kick off the recursive part which I dont really know why I do except it seems to be needed to be there. I experimented with code from a completely different assignment, thats why it looks the way it does. I know mod 2 will grant me too many new lines but at least it was an approach to finding heights to the pyramid. I understand the real approach is something similar to N+1 as with each step of the growing pyramid a new line is needed, but I dont know how to implement it.

I don't expect anyone to present a complete code but I hope somebody can clue me in on how to think on the way towards finding a solution.

I can still pass the exam without knowing recursion as its typically 2 assignments where one is and one isnt recursion and you need to pass one or the other, but given that I have some time I thought Id give it a chance.

As always, immensely thankful for anyone fighting the good fight!

Seeing this post gathered some attention Id like to expand the pyramid to one a little more complex:

THE PYRAMID PROBLEM 2

hope someone looks at it. I didnt expect so many good answers, I thought why not throw all I have out there.

Level 1
|=|

Level 2
|===|
||=||
|===|

Level 3

|=====|
||===||
|||=|||
||===||
|=====|

it needs to be figured out recursively. so some way it has to build both upwards and downwards from the center. 

To clarify Im studying for an exam and surely so are many others whom would be thankful for code to sink their teeth in. Maybe theres an easy way to apply what Tama built in terms of bowling pin lines in pyramid walls?

  • Each line is different in a mathematically related way so I would suggest a PrintLine procedure taking the indent depth and the current N, and (if N > 0) printing then calling itself with suitably modified parameters. I think it'll be a good deal simpler than the current implementation. – Brian Drummond May 30 '20 at 22:04
  • I had to look very hard to see your use of recursion. It’s not at all the sort of solution I’d have expected - something more like Brian’s would get a higher score if I was marking. – Simon Wright May 30 '20 at 22:38
  • @BrianDrummond, I think you mean to print the line first and then, if N > 1, call itself ... – Simon Wright May 30 '20 at 22:41
  • 2
    Please let us know the result of your exam. – Jim Rogers Jun 3 '20 at 15:45
  • 1
    Much thanks to you Jim Rogers, Simon Wright, TamaMcGlinn and everyone else that has guided me through Ada here on the forum. I just passed but I'm super happy about that. Its the third rest exam Ive managed to pass since this fall when my father died. I promised him when he was still alive Id finish my engineering degree. So thanks once again for doing what you do. Hopefully this will grant you some affirmation knowing you made a difference and inspire others to do the same for others. – Gustav Agrell Jun 9 '20 at 22:49
3

Bowling pins:

Printing ----I---- is just: (I'm going to use dashes instead of spaces throughout for readability)

Put_Line (4 * "-" & "I" & 4 * "-");

And printing the whole bowling triangle could be:

with Ada.Strings.Fixed; use Ada.Strings.Fixed;
with Ada.Text_IO;       use Ada.Text_IO;

procedure Main is
   procedure Print_Bowling_Line (Dashes : Natural; Pins : Positive) is
      Middle : constant String := (if Pins = 1 then "I"
                                   else (Pins - 1) * "I-" & "I");
   begin
      Put_Line (Dashes * "-" & Middle & Dashes * "-");
   end Print_Bowling_Line;
begin
   Print_Bowling_Line (0, 5);
   Print_Bowling_Line (1, 4);
   Print_Bowling_Line (2, 3);
   Print_Bowling_Line (3, 2);
   Print_Bowling_Line (4, 1);
end Main;

Writing the five repeated lines as a loop is quite obvious. For recursion, there are two ways.

Tail recursion

Tail recursion is the more natural 'ask questions, then shoot' approach; first check the parameter for an end-condition, if not, do some things and finally call self.

procedure Tail_Recurse (Pins : Natural) is
begin
   if Pins = 0 then
      return;
   end if;
   Print_Bowling_Line (Total_Pins - Pins, Pins);
   Tail_Recurse (Pins - 1);
end Tail_Recurse;

Head recursion

Head recursion is what mathematicians love; how do you construct a proof for N? Well, assuming you already have a proof for N-1, you just apply X and you're done. Again, we need to check the end condition before we go looking for a proof for N-1, otherwise we would endlessly recurse and get a stack overflow.

procedure Head_Recurse (Pins : Natural) is
begin
   if Pins < Total_Pins then
      Head_Recurse (Pins + 1); -- assuming N + 1 proof here
   end if;
   Print_Bowling_Line (Total_Pins - Pins, Pins);
end Head_Recurse;

For the full code, expand the following snippet:

with Ada.Strings.Fixed; use Ada.Strings.Fixed;
with Ada.Text_IO;       use Ada.Text_IO;

procedure Main is
   Total_Pins : Natural := 5;

   procedure Print_Bowling_Line (Dashes : Natural; Pins : Positive) is
      Middle : constant String := (if Pins = 1 then "I"
                                   else (Pins - 1) * "I-" & "I");
   begin
      Put_Line (Dashes * "-" & Middle & Dashes * "-");
   end Print_Bowling_Line;

   procedure Tail_Recurse (Pins : Natural) is
   begin
      if Pins = 0 then
         return;
      end if;
      Print_Bowling_Line (Total_Pins - Pins, Pins);
      Tail_Recurse (Pins - 1);
   end Tail_Recurse;

   procedure Head_Recurse (Pins : Natural) is
   begin
      if Pins < Total_Pins then
         Head_Recurse (Pins + 1); -- assuming N + 1 proof here
      end if;
      Print_Bowling_Line (Total_Pins - Pins, Pins);
   end Head_Recurse;
begin
   Total_Pins := 8;
   Head_Recurse (1);
end Main;

For simplicity, I don't pass around the second number, that indicates the stopping condition, but rather set it once before running the whole.

I always find it unfortunate to try to learn a technique by applying it where it makes the code more complicated, rather than less. So I want to show you a problem where recursion really does shine. Write a program that prints a maze with exactly one path between every two points in the maze, using the following depth-first-search pseudo code:

start by 'visiting' any field (2,2 in this example)
(recursion starts with this:)
while there are any neighbours that are unvisited,
   pick one at random and 
   connect the current field to that field and 
   run this procedure for the new field

As you can see in the animation below, this should meander randomly until it gets 'stuck' in the bottom left, after which it backtracks to a node that still has an unvisited neighbour. Finally, when everything is filled, all the function calls that are still active will return because for each node there will be no neighbours left to connect to.

Maze generation using Depth First Search (backtracking)

You can use the skeleton code in the snippet below. The answer should only modify the Depth_First_Make_Maze procedure. It need be no longer than 15 lines, calling Get_Unvisited_Neighbours, Is_Empty on the result, Get_Random_Neighbour and Connect (and itself, of course).

with Ada.Strings.Fixed; use Ada.Strings.Fixed;
with Ada.Text_IO;       use Ada.Text_IO;
with Ada.Containers;                     use Ada.Containers;
with Ada.Containers.Vectors;
with Ada.Numerics.Discrete_Random;

procedure Main is
   N : Positive := 11; -- should be X*2 + 1 for some X >= 1

   type Cell_Status is (Filled, Empty);
   Maze : array (1 .. N, 1 .. N) of Cell_Status := (others => (others => Filled));

   procedure Print_Maze is
   begin
  for Y in 1 .. N loop
     for X in 1 .. N loop
        declare
           C : String := (case Maze (X, Y) is
                             --when Filled => "X", -- for legibility,
                             when Filled => "█", -- unicode block 0x2588 for fun
                             when Empty  => " ");
        begin
           Put (C);
        end;
     end loop;
     Put_Line ("");
  end loop;
   end Print_Maze;

   type Cell_Address is record
  X : Positive;
  Y : Positive;
   end record;

   procedure Empty (Address : Cell_Address) is
   begin
  Maze (Address.X, Address.Y) := Empty;
   end Empty;

   procedure Connect (Address1 : Cell_Address; Address2 : Cell_Address) is
  Middle_X : Positive := (Address1.X + Address2.X) / 2;
  Middle_Y : Positive := (Address1.Y + Address2.Y) / 2;
   begin
  Empty (Address1);
  Empty (Address2);
  Empty ((Middle_X, Middle_Y));
   end Connect;

   function Cell_At (Address : Cell_Address) return Cell_Status is (Maze (Address.X, Address.Y));
   function Left (Address : Cell_Address) return Cell_Address is (Address.X - 2, Address.Y);
   function Right (Address : Cell_Address) return Cell_Address is (Address.X + 2, Address.Y);
   function Up (Address : Cell_Address) return Cell_Address is (Address.X, Address.Y - 2);
   function Down (Address : Cell_Address) return Cell_Address is (Address.X, Address.Y + 2);

   type Neighbour_Count is new Integer range 0 .. 4;
   package Neighbours_Package is new Ada.Containers.Vectors (Index_Type => Natural, Element_Type => Cell_Address);
   use Neighbours_Package;

   function Get_Unvisited_Neighbours (Address : Cell_Address) return Neighbours_Package.Vector is
  NeighbourList : Neighbours_Package.Vector;
   begin
  NeighbourList.Reserve_Capacity (4);
  if Address.X >= 4 then
     declare
        L : Cell_Address := Left (Address);
     begin
        if Cell_At (L) = Filled then
           NeighbourList.Append (L);
        end if;
     end;
  end if;
  if Address.Y >= 4 then
     declare
        U : Cell_Address := Up (Address);
     begin
        if Cell_At (U) = Filled then
           NeighbourList.Append (U);
        end if;
     end;
  end if;
  if Address.X <= (N - 3) then
     declare
        R : Cell_Address := Right (Address);
     begin
        if Cell_At (R) = Filled then
           NeighbourList.Append (R);
        end if;
     end;
  end if;
  if Address.Y <= (N - 3) then
     declare
        D : Cell_Address := Down (Address);
     begin
        if Cell_At (D) = Filled then
           NeighbourList.Append (D);
        end if;
     end;
  end if;
  return NeighbourList;
   end Get_Unvisited_Neighbours;

   package Rnd is new Ada.Numerics.Discrete_Random (Natural);
   Gen : Rnd.Generator;

   function Get_Random_Neighbour (List : Neighbours_Package.Vector) return Cell_Address is
  Random : Natural := Rnd.Random (Gen);
   begin
  if Is_Empty (List) then
     raise Program_Error with "Cannot select any item from an empty list";
  end if;
  declare
     Index : Natural := Random mod Natural (List.Length);
  begin
     return List (Index);
  end;
   end Get_Random_Neighbour;

   procedure Depth_First_Make_Maze (Address : Cell_Address) is
   begin
  null;
   end Depth_First_Make_Maze;
begin
   Rnd.Reset (Gen);
   Maze (1, 2) := Empty; -- entrance
   Maze (N, N - 1) := Empty; -- exit
   Depth_First_Make_Maze ((2, 2));
   Print_Maze;
end Main;

To see the answer, expand the following snippet.

procedure Depth_First_Make_Maze (Address : Cell_Address) is
begin
   loop
  declare
     Neighbours : Neighbours_Package.Vector := Get_Unvisited_Neighbours (Address);
  begin
     exit when Is_Empty (Neighbours);
     declare
        Next_Node : Cell_Address := Get_Random_Neighbour (Neighbours);
     begin
        Connect (Address, Next_Node);
        Depth_First_Make_Maze (Next_Node);
     end;
  end;
   end loop;
end Depth_First_Make_Maze;

Converting recursion to loop

Consider how a function call works; we take the actual parameters and put them on the call stack along with the function's address. When the function completes, we take those values off the stack again and put back the return value.

We can convert a recursive function by replacing the implicit callstack containing the parameters with an explicit stack. I.e. instead of:

procedure Foo (I : Integer) is
begin
   Foo (I + 1);
end Foo;

We would put I onto the stack, and as long as there are values on the stack, peek at the top value and do the body of the Foo procedure using that value. When there is a call to Foo within that body, push the value you would call the procedure with instead, and restart the loop so that we immediately start processing the new value. If there is no call to self in this case, we discard the top value on the stack.

Restructuring a recursive procedure in this way will give you an insight into how it works, especially since pushing on to the stack is now separated from 'calling' that function since you explicitly take an item from the stack and do something with it.

You will need a stack implementation, here is one that is suitable:

Bounded_Stack.ads

generic
   max_stack_size : Natural;
   type Element_Type is private;
package Bounded_Stack is
   type Stack is private;
   function Create return Stack;
   procedure Push (Onto : in out Stack; Item : Element_Type);
   function Pop (From : in out Stack) return Element_Type;
   function Top (From : in out Stack) return Element_Type;
   procedure Discard (From : in out Stack);
   function Is_Empty (S : in Stack) return Boolean;
   Stack_Empty_Error : exception;
   Stack_Full_Error : exception;
private
   type Element_List is array (1 .. max_stack_size) of Element_Type;
   type Stack is
      record
         list : Element_List;
         top_index : Natural := 0;
      end record;
end Bounded_Stack;

Bounded_Stack.adb

package body Bounded_Stack is

   function Create return Stack is
   begin
      return (top_index => 0, list => <>);
   end Create;

   procedure Push (Onto : in out Stack; Item : Element_Type) is
   begin
      if Onto.top_index = max_stack_size then
         raise Stack_Full_Error;
      end if;
      Onto.top_index := Onto.top_index + 1;
      Onto.list (Onto.top_index) := Item;
   end Push;

   function Pop (From : in out Stack) return Element_Type is
      Top_Value : Element_Type := Top (From);
   begin
      From.top_index := From.top_index - 1;
      return Top_Value;
   end Pop;

   function Top (From : in out Stack) return Element_Type is
   begin
      if From.top_index = 0 then
         raise Stack_Empty_Error;
      end if;
      return From.list (From.top_index);
   end Top;

   procedure Discard (From : in out Stack) is
   begin
      if From.top_index = 0 then
         raise Stack_Empty_Error;
      end if;
      From.top_index := From.top_index - 1;
   end Discard;

   function Is_Empty (S : in Stack) return Boolean is (S.top_index = 0);
end Bounded_Stack;

It can be instantiated with a maximum stack size of Width*Height, since the worst case scenario is when you happen to choose a non-forking path that visits each cell once:

N_As_Cell_Size : Natural := (N - 1) / 2;
package Cell_Stack is new Bounded_Stack(max_stack_size => N_As_Cell_Size * N_As_Cell_Size, Element_Type => Cell_Address);

Take your answer to the previous assignment, and rewrite it without recursion, using the stack above instead.

To see the answer, expand the following snippet.

procedure Depth_First_Make_Maze (Address : Cell_Address) is
   Stack : Cell_Stack.Stack := Cell_Stack.Create;
   use Cell_Stack;
begin
   Push (Stack, Address);
   loop
  exit when Is_Empty (Stack);
  declare
     -- this shadows the parameter, which we shouldn't refer to directly anyway
     Address : Cell_Address := Top (Stack);
     Neighbours : Neighbours_Package.Vector := Get_Unvisited_Neighbours (Address);
  begin
     if Is_Empty (Neighbours) then
        Discard (Stack); -- equivalent to returning from the function in the recursive version
     else
        declare
           Next_Cell : Cell_Address := Get_Random_Neighbour (Neighbours);
        begin
           Connect (Address, Next_Cell);
           Push (Stack, Next_Cell); -- equivalent to calling self in the recursive version
        end;
     end if;
  end;
   end loop;
end Depth_First_Make_Maze;

  • 2
    Wonderful post, it clearly elicits the difference between head and tail recursion. while speaking of more advanced examples. How would you using tail recursion come to grips with a top-down pyramid? That is Level 1 => !=! and level 2 is !===! !!=!! !===! Maybe you can detect the pattern? I'll edit my main post with it because I need another example of recursion to compare with the bowling pins. Im a real code monkey, I need to learn it by heart to understand as opposed to learning by way of generalizations. Eventually I learn to generalize as well but it takes some getting there. – Gustav Agrell May 31 '20 at 15:51
  • 1
    Would you recommend constructing the pyramid manually first and then applying recursion? as bits of your bowling pin line are taken almost exactly from your first example into the recursive example.. – Gustav Agrell May 31 '20 at 16:31
  • 1
    Wow, that pyramid is a nice example; it seems it would need middle recursion. And again there are two ways; either you target printing the middle part !!=!! in your example and say 'oh and by the way, you will need the N+1's before and after - OR you express it as 'well you need to print !===! twice, and in between you do the N-1 printing. – TamaMcGlinn May 31 '20 at 20:04
  • 1
    I'm not sure that I recommend doing either first, I just want you to practice making the stack explicitly. Hopefully I will have time this week to add that actual code of putting the parameter(s) onto the stack and popping them off when 'returning'. I have the code for C++ but that probably won't help so much. – TamaMcGlinn May 31 '20 at 20:05
  • I'm sorry to say I don't think there is an 'Ada standard stack' so the second assignment is a bit harder than anticipated. – TamaMcGlinn Jun 9 '20 at 5:29
2

You’re going to print as many lines as there are pins. Each line has an indentation consisting of a number of spaces and a number of pins, each printed as "I " (OK,there's an extra space at the end of the line, but no one's going to see that).

Start off with no leading spaces and the number of pins you were asked to print.

The next line needs one more leading space and one fewer pin (unless, of course, that would mean printing no pins, in which case we're done).

  • Second thought I dont understand my solution at all, each proc and func seems to use different variables; I, X, N and they come together in the pins function more by chance than skill (on my part). The IF parts all different, one is X > 0 another is I >= N and the spaces one is if I in X_Type (which is a bit like saying X > 0 if its counting downwards, isnt it?). In any case its very confusing as a beginners example of recursion. I understand what youre saying, I need to start with no spaces and N pins and work my way downward with +1 indent and - 1 pin. I cant see the code, could you help me? – Gustav Agrell May 31 '20 at 12:37
1

I don't program in Ada (it looks like a strange Pascal to me), but there is an obvious algorithmic problem in your Pins function.

Basically, if you want to print a pyramid whose base is N down to the very bottom where base is 1, you would need to do something like this (sorry for crude pascalization of the code).

procedure PrintPins(i, n: Integer)
begin
    if i >= n then return;

    Ada.Text_IO.Put('I'); // Print pin
    Ada.Text_IO.Put(' '); // Print space

    PrintPins(i + 1, n);  // Next iteration
end;

function Pins(x, indent: Integer): Integer
   printed: Integer;
begin
    printed := 0;
    if x > 0 then
       PrintSpaces(indent); // Print indentation pretty much using the same artificial approach as by printing pins
       PrintPins(0, x);
       (*Print new line here*)

       (*Now go down the next level and print another
       row*)
       printed := x + Pins(x - 1, indent + 1); 
    end;
    return printed;
end

P.S. You don't need a specific function to count the number of printed pins here. It's just a Gauss sequence sum of the range 1..N, which is given by N(N + 1)/2

  • Thanks for your answer jvd! Im stuck in your explanation on printing X number of I's. Put_Line("I") places one pin and grants a new line. Id need something general for the next steps. Without doing a loop I dont know how to place I's. – Gustav Agrell May 30 '20 at 18:32
  • Perhaps you want to use the Ada.Text_IO.Put function, not Put_Line. Moreover, if you need to space your pins as in the example above, you will need to print something like this: offset|pin|space|pin|space|pin|space|... etc. in the next line you would print offset + 1|pin|space|pin|space|... etc. You can add the offset parameter to the function (I did not add it for clarity), and in each subsequent line where you would increase the offset (and decrease x). The starting offset is 0. – jvd May 30 '20 at 18:36
  • ok I understand a little bit better, I need an indent to the function as well. in the assignment I have its a tip to make 2 functions where one does the spaces and the other one places the pins. Ill get to that at some point but Im still wondering how you place X pins without a loop? the only way Ive learned is for I in 1..N loop put(I) etc. whats the code Im missing to print X pins? :) welcome to the site by the way! – Gustav Agrell May 30 '20 at 18:41
  • BTW, you can print the pattern both using the loop and without the loop. If you really want to print that pattern without the loop, just do an artificial loop via tail recursion. The key idea here is to decouple row printing from the pin printing. Because you seem to stuck on optimizing the whole pattern, when you only need to take care of a single row. – jvd May 30 '20 at 18:43
  • 2
    Ada.Strings.Fixed does have a function overriding the * function. function "*" (Left : in Natural; Right : in Character) return String; – Jim Rogers May 30 '20 at 21:32
1

A variation of this program is to use both head recursion and tail recursion in the same procedure. The output of such a program is

Enter the number of rows in the pyramid: 5
I I I I I 
 I I I I 
  I I I 
   I I 
    I 
    I 
   I I 
  I I I 
 I I I I 
I I I I I 

N = 5

Tail recursion produces the upper triangle and head recursion produces the lower triangle.

  • 1
    nice find, I was experimenting with just that how to make a regular pyramid out of the code. I resorted to doing a version of head recursion but was baffled by the discovery that it resulted in the upside down pyramid if I switched "side" of the call to the other side of the if block. it may be useful in finding a solution to the more advanced pyramid puzzle. – Gustav Agrell May 31 '20 at 20:59
1

The way you develop a recursive algorithm is to pretend that you already have a subprogram that does what you want, except for the first bit, and you know, or can figure out, how to do the first bit. Then your algorithm is

Do the first bit
Call the subprogram to do the rest on what remains,
   taking into account the effect of the first bit, if necessary

The trick is that "Call the subprogram to do the rest" is a recursive call to the subprogram you're creating.

It's always possible that the subprogram may be called when there's nothing to do, so you have to take that into account:

if Ending Condition then
   Do any final actions

   return [expression];
end if;

Do the first bit
Call the subprogram to do the rest

And you're done. By repreatedly doing the first bit until the ending condition is True, you end up doing the whole thing.

As an example, the function Get_Line in Ada.Text_IO may be implemented (this is not how it is usually implemented) by thinking, "I know how to get the first Character of the line. If I have a function to return the rest of the line, then I can return the first Character concatenated with the function result." So:

function Get_Line return String is
   C : Character;
begin
   Get (Item => C);

   return C & Get_Line;
end Get_Line;

But what if we're already at the end of a line, so there's no line to get?

function Get_Line return String is
   C : Character;
begin
   if End_Of_Line then
      Skip_Line;

      return "";
   end if;

   Get (Item => C);

   return C & Get_Line;
end Get_Line;

For your problem the first bit is printing a row with an indent and a number of pins, and the ending condition is when there are no more rows to print.

For your pyramid problem, this tail recursion scheme doesn't work. You need to do "middle recursion":

if Level = 1 then
   Print the line for Level

   return
end if

Print the top line for Level
Recurse for Level - 1
Print the bottom line for Level

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