21

The Problem:

I am attempting to use R to generate a random study design where half of the participants are randomly assigned to "Treatement 1" and the other half are assigned to "Treatment 2". However, because half of the subjects are male and half are female and I also want to ensure that an equal number of males and females are exposed to each treatment, half of the males and females should be assigned to "Treatment 1" and the remaining half should be assigned to "Treatment 2".

There are two complications to this design: (1) This is a yearlong study and the assignment of participants to treatment must occur on a daily basis; and (2) Each participant must be exposed to "Treatment 1" a minimum 10 times in a 28 day period.

Is this even possible to automate this in the R interface? I assume so, but I think my beginner status as an R programmer prohibits me from finding the solution on my own. I have been struggling for days to figure out how to actualize this, and have looked through many similar-sounding posts on this site that were not able to be successfully applied here. I am hoping someone out there knows some tricks that could help me get unstuck in solving this problem, any advice would be greatly appreciated!

What I Have Tried:

Specific Information

# There are 16 participants
p <- c("P01", "P02", "P03", "P04", "P05", "P06", "P07", "P08", "P09", "P10", "P11", "P12", "P13", "P14", "P15", "P16")

# Half are male and half are female
g <- c(rep("M", 8), rep("F", 8))

# I make a dataframe but this may not be necessary
df <- cbind.data.frame(p,g)

# There are 365 days in one year
d <- seq(1,365,1)

...unfortunately, I am not sure how to proceed from here.

Ideal Outcome:

I am envisioning something approximate to this table as the outcome: I do not have enough reputation points to embed images yet so here is the link, sorry!

Basically there is a column for each participant and a row for each day. Associated with each day is an assignment to either Treatment 1 (T1) or Treatment 2 (T2), with 4 of the 8 males and 4 of the 8 females being assigned to T1 and the remainder to T2. These treatments are reassigned every day for 1 year. Not depicted in this chart is the need for each participant to be exposed to T1 at least 10 times in a 28-day period. The table does not have to look like that if something else makes more sense!

  • Can you give more detail on how people are sampled into the study? This is important when trying to suggest code. I'm not sure how you can sample people that don't exist. Sampling is normally done once you have all the observations from which you are sampling. If you know how many males and females you will recruit into the study, a solution is possible. If you don't know how many you will sample in, I don't think it is possible to solve your problem - because there is no basis upon which to do the sampling. – Michelle May 30 at 23:15
  • 2
    @Michelle I think from the description and the table, the OP wants to recruit 8 males and 8 females, who will each receive a treatment on 365 consecutive days. Is that unwarranted? – Allan Cameron May 30 at 23:32
  • 1
    @Michelle Yes Allan's response is perfect, the participants are predetermined by a different mechanism. In reality, I am talking about sampling wind turbines and the "males" are in the western region of the facility and the "females" are in the eastern region but I was trying to simplify the request to be more generic so it is hopefully more relatable to the broader community. – Einahpets May 30 at 23:53
  • Excellent first question. Maybe remove the for-loop and dplyr tags and it would be perfect. 🙂 – Edward May 31 at 1:05
  • 4
7
0

Consider splitting data frame by day and gender with by, then run enough samples with replicate at 100 times to pick one of several where treatments are balanced:

Data

df <- merge(data.frame(participant = p, gender = g), 
            data.frame(days = seq(1,365)), 
            by=NULL)

Solution

df_list <- by(df, list(df$gender, df$days), function(sub){
  t <- replicate(100, {                                        # RUN 100 REPETITIONS OF EXPRESSION
    s <- sample(c("T1", "T2"), size=nrow(sub), replace=TRUE)   # SAMPLE "T1" AND "T2" BY SIZE OF SUBSET
    s[ sum(s == "T1") == sum(s == "T2") ]                      # FILTER TO EQUAL TREATMENTS 
  })

  t <- Filter(length, t)[[1]]             # SELECT FIRST OF SEVERAL NON-EMPTY RETURNS
  transform(sub, treatment = t)           # ASSIGN RESULT TO NEW COLUMN
})

# BIND DATA FRAMES AND RESET ROW.NAMES
final_df <- data.frame(do.call(rbind.data.frame, df_list), row.names=NULL)

Output

Day 1

head(final_df, 16)

#    participant gender days treatment
# 1          P09      F    1        T1
# 2          P10      F    1        T2
# 3          P11      F    1        T2
# 4          P12      F    1        T1
# 5          P13      F    1        T2
# 6          P14      F    1        T2
# 7          P15      F    1        T1
# 8          P16      F    1        T1
# 9          P01      M    1        T1
# 10         P02      M    1        T1
# 11         P03      M    1        T2
# 12         P04      M    1        T2
# 13         P05      M    1        T2
# 14         P06      M    1        T1
# 15         P07      M    1        T1
# 16         P08      M    1        T2

Day 365

tail(final_df, 16)

#      participant gender days treatment
# 5825         P09      F  365        T2
# 5826         P10      F  365        T2
# 5827         P11      F  365        T1
# 5828         P12      F  365        T2
# 5829         P13      F  365        T1
# 5830         P14      F  365        T2
# 5831         P15      F  365        T1
# 5832         P16      F  365        T1
# 5833         P01      M  365        T1
# 5834         P02      M  365        T2
# 5835         P03      M  365        T1
# 5836         P04      M  365        T2
# 5837         P05      M  365        T2
# 5838         P06      M  365        T2
# 5839         P07      M  365        T1
# 5840         P08      M  365        T1

Ideally, for analytical purposes you should keep data in long format (i.e., tidy data). But if needing wide format consider reshape with helper and cleanup processing:

# HELPER OBJECTS
final_df$participant_gender <- with(final_df, paste0(participant, gender))
new_names <- paste0(p, g)

# RESHAPE WIDE
wide_df <- reshape(final_df, v.names = "treatment", timevar = "participant_gender", 
                   idvar="days", drop = c("gender", "participant"), 
                   new.row.names = 1:365, direction = "wide")

# RENAME AND RE-ORDER COLUMNS
names(wide_df) <- gsub("treatment.", "", names(wide_df))
wide_df <- wide_df[c("days", new_names)]

head(wide_df)
#   days P01M P02M P03M P04M P05M P06M P07M P08M P09F P10F P11F P12F P13F P14F P15F P16F
# 1    1   T1   T1   T2   T2   T2   T1   T1   T2   T1   T2   T2   T1   T2   T2   T1   T1
# 2    2   T1   T1   T2   T1   T2   T1   T2   T2   T1   T2   T2   T1   T2   T2   T1   T1
# 3    3   T1   T1   T2   T1   T1   T2   T2   T2   T1   T2   T2   T2   T1   T2   T1   T1
# 4    4   T1   T1   T1   T2   T2   T2   T1   T2   T2   T1   T1   T2   T2   T1   T1   T2
# 5    5   T1   T1   T2   T1   T2   T2   T1   T2   T1   T1   T2   T1   T2   T2   T1   T2
# 6    6   T2   T1   T1   T1   T2   T2   T1   T2   T2   T2   T2   T1   T2   T1   T1   T1
| improve this answer | |
  • Thanks @Parfait, it is cool to see all the ways to solve the same problem. I think this answer is the most tailored to the original post. Take care! – Einahpets Jun 1 at 1:54
  • Great to hear. and glad to help! Also, this solution does not hard-code any number so can adapt to any level of observations should they run uneven across days. However, odd-numbered groupings that can not evenly balance will not find a match. – Parfait Jun 1 at 14:28
7
0

Nice first question. Thanks for posting.

My understanding of your constraints is that on any given day, four males must have one treatment and four males the other treatment. The same is true of the eight females: there must be four getting each treatment. Effectively, this means that on any given day, you only need a random sample applied to four individuals, since the rest of the individuals will effectively be constrained by the first four. Males 5 - 8 will be paired up to males 1 - 4, so that male 1 always get the opposite treatment to male 5, male 2 gets the opposite treatment to male 6, etc. The same pattern is applied to the females, so that although the individual assignations are random, there are always 4 females getting treatment 1, 4 females getting treatment 2, four males getting treatment 1 and four males getting treatment 2 on any given day.

You want at least ten days where each person gets treatment 1 in a 28-day period. This further constrains randomization to the point where it probably makes as much sense to ensure that each 28 day period contains a total of 14 days of treatment 1 and 14 days of treatment 2.

That way, you can get your assignations like this:

four_cols <- replicate(4, as.vector(replicate(14, sample(rep(1:2, 14))))[1:365])
eight_cols <- cbind(four_cols, 3 - four_cols)
sixteen_cols <- cbind(1:365, eight_cols, eight_cols)
df <- setNames(as.data.frame(sixteen_cols), c("Day", paste0("M", 1:8), paste0("F", 1:8)))

Now df is a data frame with a layout like your table. The treatments are given as numbers 1 or 2 and the participants are labelled M1 - M8 and F1 - F8:

df
#>    Day M1 M2 M3 M4 M5 M6 M7 M8 F1 F2 F3 F4 F5 F6 F7 F8
#> 1    1  1  1  1  1  2  2  2  2  1  1  1  1  2  2  2  2
#> 2    2  2  2  2  2  1  1  1  1  2  2  2  2  1  1  1  1
#> 3    3  2  1  1  2  1  2  2  1  2  1  1  2  1  2  2  1
#> 4    4  2  2  2  1  1  1  1  2  2  2  2  1  1  1  1  2
#> 5    5  1  2  1  1  2  1  2  2  1  2  1  1  2  1  2  2
#> 6    6  2  2  2  2  1  1  1  1  2  2  2  2  1  1  1  1
#> 7    7  1  2  1  1  2  1  2  2  1  2  1  1  2  1  2  2
#> 8    8  1  1  2  2  2  2  1  1  1  1  2  2  2  2  1  1
#> 9    9  2  2  1  2  1  1  2  1  2  2  1  2  1  1  2  1
#> 10  10  2  1  2  2  1  2  1  1  2  1  2  2  1  2  1  1
#> 11  11  1  2  2  2  2  1  1  1  1  2  2  2  2  1  1  1
#> 12  12  2  1  2  1  1  2  1  2  2  1  2  1  1  2  1  2
#> 13  13  1  1  1  1  2  2  2  2  1  1  1  1  2  2  2  2
#> 14  14  2  1  1  1  1  2  2  2  2  1  1  1  1  2  2  2
#> 15  15  1  1  2  1  2  2  1  2  1  1  2  1  2  2  1  2
#> 16  16  1  2  1  1  2  1  2  2  1  2  1  1  2  1  2  2
#> 17  17  2  2  2  2  1  1  1  1  2  2  2  2  1  1  1  1
#> ...
#> 365 365  2  2  2  2  1  1  1  1  2  2  2  2  1  1  1  1
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Nice answer! The solution is trivial if you restate the problem as you have -- 14 days for each participant in T1 and T2. It's far more interesting as originally formulated. I believe the proper solution is a zero-one linear programming problem, but I need to think a bit more about it – Alex W May 30 at 23:30
  • Wow, that was so quick! Your solution is an amazing way of simplifying and solving the problem and meeting the requirements! Instead of binding eight_cols twice, I would probably generate the four_cols and eight_cols separately for males and females, otherwise M1 and F1 would always be in the same group on a given day (same with M2 and F2, M3 and F3, etc.). Alex, if you have an alternative approach, that is welcome as well! Thanks so much Allan!! – Einahpets May 30 at 23:56
2
0

Here is my approach. Surely it can be optimized, but I want to share my idea:

library(tidyverse)
p <- c("P01", "P02", "P03", "P04", "P05", "P06", "P07", "P08", "P09", "P10", "P11", "P12", "P13", "P14", "P15", "P16")

g <- c(rep("M", 8), rep("F", 8))

df <- data.frame(participant=p, sex=g)

First I create a data.frame for 13 cycles with 28 days. This gives us 13*28=364 days.

days <- data.frame(day=rep(1:28, 13), cycle=rep(1:13, each=28))
df <- merge(df, days)  # merge/cross_join with df

Now I build a function that creates a logical vector for each group (male/female) with the condition "at least 10 times TRUE per participant"

rand_assign <- function(n_participants=16){
  # create all possible combinations with 50 % treatment 1, 50 % treatment 2
  comb <- list(0:1) %>%
    rep(n_participants/2) %>%
    expand.grid() %>%
    filter(rowSums(.)==n_participants/4)

  save_list <- list()
  for (i in 1:2) {
    repeat {
      a <- comb %>% 
        nrow() %>%
        seq(1,.,1) %>%
        sample(28, replace=TRUE) %>%
        slice(comb,.)
      if (all(colSums(a) >= 10)) {
        break
      }
    }
    save_list[[i]] <- a
  }

  c <- save_list %>%
    cbind.data.frame() %>%
    t() %>%
    as.vector
  return(c)
}

Last step is combining the vector with the given data.frame

df %>%
  group_by(cycle) %>%
  mutate(treat_1 := rand_assign()) %>%
  group_by(sex) %>%
  pivot_wider(names_from=c(sex,participant), values_from=treat_1) %>%
  mutate(day = 1:nrow(.)) %>%
  dplyr::select(-cycle)

This yields

# A tibble: 364 x 17
     day M_P01 M_P02 M_P03 M_P04 M_P05 M_P06 M_P07 M_P08 F_P09 F_P10 F_P11 F_P12 F_P13
   <int> <int> <int> <int> <int> <int> <int> <int> <int> <int> <int> <int> <int> <int>
 1     1     1     1     0     1     0     1     0     0     0     0     1     1     1
 2     2     1     0     0     0     1     0     1     1     0     0     0     1     1
 3     3     0     1     0     1     0     1     1     0     0     1     0     1     0
 4     4     0     1     1     1     0     0     1     0     0     1     1     0     1
 5     5     0     1     1     0     1     0     0     1     1     0     0     1     1
 6     6     0     1     1     1     1     0     0     0     1     0     0     0     1
 7     7     0     0     0     1     1     1     0     1     0     0     1     0     0
 8     8     1     0     1     0     0     1     0     1     0     0     1     0     1
 9     9     0     1     0     1     1     0     1     0     1     0     1     1     0
10    10     1     1     0     0     1     1     0     0     1     1     0     0     0

with 1 and 0 corresponding to Treatment 1 or 2.

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    I think there is a parentheses missing in the final chunk of code at the "mutate(day = 1:nrow(.)" line, it seems to need to be "mutate(day = 1:nrow(.))" to avoid an error message. Also, for some reason the last line "select(-cycle)" results in the following error "Error in (function (classes, fdef, mtable) : unable to find an inherited method for function ‘select’ for signature ‘"tbl_df"’ ". I only have the tidyverse package loaded, no others, so not sure what is generating this error. I'll continue to troubleshoot! Thanks for your response! – Einahpets May 31 at 0:20
  • Made two changes (parentheses, forced using dplyr for select). Please try again. – Martin Gal May 31 at 0:25
  • Take a look at this question regarding the function (classes, fdef, mtable) error. – Martin Gal May 31 at 0:27
  • @Einahpets actually I made a mistake, that solution violets the "half of the males and females should be assigned to Treatment 1 and the remaining half should be assigned to Treatment 2" condition. – Martin Gal May 31 at 9:10
  • @Einahpets I made a change to my code. Now it includes the condition I missed formerly. – Martin Gal May 31 at 18:05

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.