185

I decided to create simple isEven and isOdd function with a very simple algorithm:

function isEven(n) {
  n = Number(n);
  return n === 0 || !!(n && !(n%2));
}

function isOdd(n) {
  return isEven(Number(n) + 1);
}

That is OK if n is with certain parameters, but fails for many scenarios. So I set out to create robust functions that deliver correct results for as many scenarios as I could, so that only integers within the limits of javascript numbers are tested, everything else returns false (including + and - infinity). Note that zero is even.

// Returns true if:
//
//    n is an integer that is evenly divisible by 2
//
// Zero (+/-0) is even
// Returns false if n is not an integer, not even or NaN
// Guard against empty string

(function (global) {

  function basicTests(n) {

    // Deal with empty string
    if (n === '') 
      return false;

    // Convert n to Number (may set to NaN)
    n = Number(n);

    // Deal with NaN
    if (isNaN(n)) 
      return false;

    // Deal with infinity - 
    if (n === Number.NEGATIVE_INFINITY || n === Number.POSITIVE_INFINITY)
      return false;

    // Return n as a number
    return n;
  }

  function isEven(n) {

    // Do basic tests
    if (basicTests(n) === false)
      return false;

    // Convert to Number and proceed
    n = Number(n);

    // Return true/false
    return n === 0 || !!(n && !(n%2));
  }
  global.isEven = isEven;

  // Returns true if n is an integer and (n+1) is even
  // Returns false if n is not an integer or (n+1) is not even
  // Empty string evaluates to zero so returns false (zero is even)
  function isOdd(n) {

    // Do basic tests
    if (basicTests(n) === false)
      return false;

    // Return true/false
    return n === 0 || !!(n && (n%2));
  }
  global.isOdd = isOdd;

}(this));

Can anyone see any issues with the above? Is there a better (i.e. more accurate, faster or more concise without being obfuscated) version?

There are various posts relating to other languages, but I can't seem to find a definitive version for ECMAScript.

22 Answers 22

382

Use modulus:

function isEven(n) {
   return n % 2 == 0;
}

function isOdd(n) {
   return Math.abs(n % 2) == 1;
}

You can check that any value in Javascript can be coerced to a number with:

Number.isFinite(parseFloat(n))

This check should preferably be done outside the isEven and isOdd functions, so you don't have to duplicate error handling in both functions.

| improve this answer | |
  • @Steve Yes, but JS has some special issues when value is not a number, or even if it's a number. Ex.: 0.1%2, NaN%2, []%2, etc. What you wrote in the answer, he already knows it. – Alin Purcaru Jun 2 '11 at 7:29
  • 1
    0.1 and NaN work fine with the function above. Empty array is a bit of a pain as it equates to 0... – Steve Mayne Jun 2 '11 at 7:41
  • 4
    @Alin - I've added a numeric check. I'm not sure I understand the scenario when you'd want an arithmetic function to explicitly handle other datatypes, but if that's what the OP wants... – Steve Mayne Jun 2 '11 at 7:51
  • 2
    What about changing return n == parseInt(n); to return n === parseInt(n);? – JiminP Jun 2 '11 at 7:52
  • 2
    I think I read somewhere what you should check n % 2 !== 0 when checking for odd numbers, because it isn't necessarily 1, depending on the language. EDIT: Ah, that is what the .abs call is for. Nevermind then. – ptf Dec 5 '14 at 9:41
84

I prefer using a bit test:

if(i & 1)
{
    // ODD
}
else
{
    // EVEN
}

This tests whether the first bit is on which signifies an odd number.

| improve this answer | |
  • Only useful if you know i is a number to start with. Non–numbers should return undefined (or maybe throw an error, but undefined seems sensible). – RobG Mar 11 '14 at 0:15
  • 3
    Absolutely. Using modulus for base-2 math should be illegal ;) – aceofspades Jan 5 '17 at 22:11
  • 4
    Ternary: i & 1 == 1 ? console.log("odd") : console.log("even"); Also, +1 for bit level efficiency (not as widely used in JS) – Jacksonkr Sep 15 '17 at 15:38
  • 14
    @Jacksonkr Note that there is no “bit level efficiency” in JavaScript because all numbers are floats in JavaScript and using a bitwise operator means first converting it into an int, then performing the operation, and then converting it back to a floating point number. – poke Sep 25 '17 at 11:25
  • 1
    @poke Correct they are of type Number but it's nice to know that there is efficiency in strongly typed languages. – Robert Brisita Sep 26 '17 at 2:58
8

How about the following? I only tested this in IE, but it was quite happy to handle strings representing numbers of any length, actual numbers that were integers or floats, and both functions returned false when passed a boolean, undefined, null, an array or an object. (Up to you whether you want to ignore leading or trailing blanks when a string is passed in - I've assumed they are not ignored and cause both functions to return false.)

function isEven(n) {
   return /^-?\d*[02468]$/.test(n);
}

function isOdd(n) {
   return /^-?\d*[13579]$/.test(n);
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    For my implementation isEven(2.122e3) returns true, but isEven("2.122e3") returns false. Conversely my isEven() fails for really big numbers because JS puts them in the exponent format when converting to string for the regex test. Oh well. – nnnnnn Jun 2 '11 at 9:44
  • @MartijnScheffer - Feel free to send me the bill for all that extra memory that you'll have to buy. Note that the question did include conversions from other types to number, and clearly the point of what I'm suggesting here is to have a simple one-line function that handles numbers and strings. Of course, as per my own comment this doesn't actually handle all possible cases, but it still may be useful - regex is the simplest way to validate user-entered data, which will be a string initially. – nnnnnn Nov 25 '19 at 5:58
  • did i post a comment here ? i don't see it, but i can if you want one !, this is NOT a correct solution, this is hundreds of times slower, and we are talking about numbers not strings, if you want to check if a string is a valid number, and an integer that can be handled separatly. – Martijn Scheffer Jan 10 at 0:03
  • @MartijnScheffer - Yes, there was a comment from you, seems to have been deleted at some point since my reply. Note that the question wasn't only about numbers, the OP's code included conversions from other types. Anyway, thanks for your feedback. – nnnnnn Jan 10 at 2:02
7

Note: there are also negative numbers.

function isOddInteger(n)
{
   return isInteger(n) && (n % 2 !== 0);
}

where

function isInteger(n)
{
   return n === parseInt(n, 10);
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Doesn't parseInt need a radix here? – blablabla Jun 25 '15 at 8:12
  • @blablabla Yes, not all implementations assume radix = 10. – Rodrigo Dec 5 '16 at 15:53
  • Good citation of negative values. Robert Brisita's answer (which was added later) covers this as well. – Jacksonkr Sep 15 '17 at 15:43
4

Why not just do this:

    function oddOrEven(num){
        if(num % 2 == 0)
            return "even";
        return "odd";
    }
    oddOrEven(num);
| improve this answer | |
  • Or even function isEven(num) { return num % 2 == 0 } – chiapa Sep 14 '17 at 9:57
  • 3
    or with ES6: const oddOrEven = num => num % 2 === 0 ? 'even' : 'odd' – enguerran Jan 24 '18 at 22:21
4

To complete Robert Brisita's bit test .

if ( ~i & 1 ) {
    // Even
}
| improve this answer | |
1
var isEven = function(number) {
    // Your code goes here!
    if (number % 2 == 0){
       return(true);
    }
    else{
       return(false);    
    }
};
| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    The if ( <expression> ) return true else return false paradigm can always be simplified to return ( <expression> ) (since the expression in an if already is always a boolean one). – Gerold Broser Aug 20 '17 at 9:35
  • saying that return isn't a function, is like saying if isn't a function, it's perfectly valid to use parenthesis when returning a value (even if they aren't not useful here) – Martijn Scheffer Nov 25 '19 at 5:35
1

A simple modification/improvement of Steve Mayne answer!

function isEvenOrOdd(n){
    if(n === parseFloat(n)){
        return isNumber(n) && (n % 2 == 0);
    }
    return false;
}

Note: Returns false if invalid!

| improve this answer | |
1

We just need one line of code for this!

Here a newer and alternative way to do this, using the new ES6 syntax for JS functions, and the one-line syntax for the if-else statement call:

const isEven = num => ((num % 2) == 0) ? true : false;

alert(isEven(8));  //true
alert(isEven(9));  //false
alert(isEven(-8)); //true
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Which is shorter as let isEven = num => num % 2 === 0. :-) But really it's no different to many other answers here. – RobG Apr 4 '19 at 23:34
1

A few

x % 2 == 0; // Check if even

!(x & 1); // bitmask the value with 1 then invert.

((x >> 1) << 1) == x; // divide value by 2 then multiply again and check against original value

~x&1; // flip the bits and bitmask
| improve this answer | |
0

Different way:

var isEven = function(number) {
  // Your code goes here!
  if (((number/2) - Math.floor(number/2)) === 0) {return true;} else {return false;};
};

isEven(69)
| improve this answer | |
0

Otherway using strings because why not

function isEven(__num){
    return String(__num/2).indexOf('.') === -1;
}
| improve this answer | |
0
if (testNum == 0);
else if (testNum % 2  == 0);
else if ((testNum % 2) != 0 );
| improve this answer | |
  • With no explanation your contribution does not have much value. It also repeats information that has already been presented in the discussion. – Cindy Meister Apr 3 '16 at 21:11
  • Thanks Cindy! Just offering a solution! – Lindsay Aug 29 '16 at 2:59
  • But...this doesn't actually do anything. Shouldn't it return something? – nnnnnn Oct 13 '16 at 12:41
0

Maybe this? if(ourNumber % 2 !== 0)

| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    While this code snippet may solve the question, including an explanation really helps to improve the quality of your post. Remember that you are answering the question for readers in the future, and those people might not know the reasons for your code suggestion. Please also try not to crowd your code with explanatory comments, this reduces the readability of both the code and the explanations! – Filnor Mar 28 '18 at 13:15
0
var num = someNumber
    isEven;
parseInt(num/2) === num/2 ? isEven = true : isEven = false;
| improve this answer | |
0

for(var a=0; a<=20;a++){
   if(a%2!==0){
       console.log("Odd number "+a);
   }
}

for(var b=0; b<=20;a++){
    if(b%2===0){
        console.log("Even number "+b);  
    }     
 }

| improve this answer | |
  • While this code may solve the question, including an explanation of how and why this solves the problem would really help to improve the quality of your post, and probably result in more up-votes. Remember that you are answering the question for readers in the future, not just the person asking now. Please edit your answer to add explanations and give an indication of what limitations and assumptions apply. – Xnero Jun 24 at 12:02
0
var isOdd = x => Boolean(x % 2);
var isEven = x => !isOdd(x);
| improve this answer | |
-1

To test whether or not you have a odd or even number, this also works.

const comapare = x => integer(checkNumber(x));

function checkNumber (x) {
   if (x % 2 == 0) {
       return true;
   } 
   else if (x % 2 != 0) {
       return false;
    }
}

function integer (x) {
   if (x) {
       console.log('even');
   } 
   else {
       console.log('odd');
    }
}
| improve this answer | |
-1

Using modern javascript style:

const NUMBERS = "nul one two three four five six seven ocho nueve".split(" ")

const isOdd  = n=> NUMBERS[n % 10].indexOf("e")!=-1
const isEven = n=> isOdd(+n+1)
| improve this answer | |
  • isOdd('5')) returns true. isEven('5') also returns true. isOdd(NaN) throws an error. :-( – RobG Oct 31 '17 at 1:39
  • Fixed isEven('5'). isOdd(NaN) probably should throw an error. – gunn Oct 31 '17 at 3:08
  • 1
    The script host should not be handling the error, the function should. I was always told a core dump is not a normal termination. ;-) – RobG Oct 31 '17 at 7:15
-2

This one is more simple!

  var num = 3 //instead get your value here
  var aa = ["Even", "Odd"];

  alert(aa[num % 2]);
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    That will return undefined for num = -1 – Linus Oleander Dec 10 '15 at 4:01
-2
function isEven(n) {return parseInt(n)%2===0?true:parseInt(n)===0?true:false}

when 0/even wanted but

isEven(0) //true
isEven(1) //false
isEven(2) //true
isEven(142856) //true
isEven(142856.142857)//true
isEven(142857.1457)//false

| improve this answer | |
  • Or return parseInt(n)%2===0?true:parseInt(n)===0. but then again, this is the same as many of the other answers already here. – Heretic Monkey Jun 4 '19 at 21:48
  • 1
    Or return parseInt(n)%2 === 0 || parseInt(n) === 0. But why parseInt? That returns true for values like "32foo" and 12.5, which are not even. – RobG Jun 5 '19 at 7:20
-2
if (i % 2) {
return odd numbers
}

if (i % 2 - 1) {
return even numbers
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    when will the reminder of dividing any number by 2 be 2? – user85421 Sep 23 '19 at 15:01
  • Hm, yea you have right. I miss write % 2 == 2. My bad. – Dejan Markovic Sep 24 '19 at 16:12

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