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enter image description hereCan we remove .h extensions while we define our own header file in c++? like in case of standard header files in c++.

I have created a header file and named it add.h and tried including it using #include "add" but it didn't work.

after following up the comments and answers: using codeblocks ide i have created a "add" of type File and tried it including in my source file and it worked. attaching the snapshot below. the aim of my question is to ask if userdefined header files can also omit .h extensions and how? i am really trying to explore this fact and don't have a good understanding of how compilers stores standard header files. A easy to understood conclusion is really appreciated Thankyou.

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  • Did you try it? What happened?
    – KamilCuk
    Jun 1, 2020 at 10:53
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    @KamilCuk Since the language has UB, just trying something out doesn't quite cut it all the time. I think it's a valid question.
    – Ted Lyngmo
    Jun 1, 2020 at 10:57
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    You can call your header file anything you like (even 😊, depending on your compiler and filesystem), IDEs and people might struggle to recognise that your file is a c++ header though Jun 1, 2020 at 10:58
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    The standard headers lack an extension because the physical files lack an extension. There's no removal going on at all. Jun 1, 2020 at 11:23
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    @underscore_d -- that's not actually correct. Headers enclosed in <...> are not required to correspond to actual files; they provide the appropriate declarations and definitions in an implementation-specific manner. Their contents could be built in to the compiler. Even when there is a file behind the header (which is the typical implementation) there is no requirement that the name in the #include directive matches the name of the file. In the early days, Borland's C++ compiler got the name of the file by appending ".h" to the name in the #include <...> directive. Jun 1, 2020 at 12:57

2 Answers 2

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Can we remove .h extensions while we define our own header file in c++?

Sure, as long as that matches the filename of the file. As far as the language is concerned, the name of the file is largely irrelevant.

However, .h or similar such as .hpp is conventional, and helps the reader of the source to understand what the file is used for. This is an important consideration.

Another consideration is that some tools use the filename as a heuristic to determine the purpose of the file. For example, your IDE might not assume that the file contains C++ code, and thus not enable C++ features such as source analysis unless you follow a common naming convention.

I have created a header file and named it add.h and tried it including in source file using #include "add" but it didn't work.i know i am missing some important concepts here.

What you're missing is that the include directive must match the name of the file. If you include "add", then you must name the file add, not add.h. If you name a file add.h, then you must include "add.h", not "add".

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    The reason there is no .h extension for iostream and others is simply that the C++ standard library does not use it in their filenames. Why that is, as it is contrary to convention, is another question surely.
    – flowit
    Jun 1, 2020 at 10:58
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    @flowit • The C++ standard library's headers do not have to be stored in files. They may be pre-tokenized and stored as data in the compiler itself. (The compilers I use store them as files.)
    – Eljay
    Jun 1, 2020 at 11:21
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    @flowit - Historically, it was because of a mandatory requirement to minimise incompatibility/conflict with C. Early drafts of the C++ standard (pre first ratified C++ standard in 1998) had C++ standard headers with a .h extensions (like <iostream.h>). As the draft developed, eventually the logical name for a C++ header clashed with an existing C header - from memory, that was <string.h>. They considered a few options. The resolution was to drop the .h extensions from all C++ standard headers, and also to have C++ versions of C headers (<cstdio>, etc).
    – Peter
    Jun 1, 2020 at 11:22
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    @eerorika - I'm not Elijay, but can mention a couple of C and C++ implementations that used a database to store C and (later) C++ headers. One was the C compiler on VAX/VMS (although there was a non-default installation option to install the header files as files). Some versions of Silicon Graphics IRIX operating systems had both C and C++ compilers that used such a database as well (and also had a pretty awesome system for template instantiation at link time which managed to reduce size of executable files using templates).
    – Peter
    Jun 1, 2020 at 11:28
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    @TedLyngmo It's mildly curious that both "yes" and "no" are correct answers to the question depending on how the question / case is interpreted.
    – eerorika
    Jun 1, 2020 at 11:35
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Can we remove .h extensions while we define our own header file in c++? like in case of standard header files in c++.

You've misunderstood how the files in the stardard library are named. The header file iostream is actually named iostream and not iostream.hpp or iostream.h (unless you use a very old compiler).

I have created a header file and named it add.h and tried including it using #include "add" but it didn't work.

The reason that doesn't work is because the pre-compiler tries to read the file add and you've named the file add.h.

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