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So while working through a course on Udemy over C++ one of the challenges was to check a string to see whether it was a palindrome or not. I completed the task successfully but went about it a different way than the instructor. I understand there are a multitude of ways to complete a task but I am wondering which is more efficient and why? It may seem stupid to be wondering about this while reteaching myself coding but I feel this is something I should be keeping in mind.

//Instructors code//

# include<iostream>
using namespace std;

/*program for reverse a string and check a string is a palidrome

*/
int main()
{
    string str="MADAM";
    string rev="";
    int len=(int)str.length();
    rev.resize(len);
    for(int i=0, j=len-1; i<len; i++, j--)
    {
        rev[i]=str[j];
    }
    rev[len]='\0';  
    if(str.compare(rev)==0)
        cout<<"palindrome"<<endl;
    else
        cout<<"not a pallindrome"<<endl;
    return 0;
}

My Approach

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int main(){
    string str1="test";
//    cout << "Enter a string to check if it is a Palindrome: ";
//    getline(cin,str1);

    string str2;

    string::reverse_iterator it;
    for(it=str1.rbegin(); it!= str1.rend(); it++)
    {
        str2.push_back(*it);

    }
    if(!str1.compare(str2))
        cout << "\nPalindrome";
    else
        cout << "\nNot a Palindrome";
    return 0;
}

Thank you in advance.

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  • 1
  • 2
    str2.push_back(*it); is going to be somewhat wasteful especially if the string is very long and needs to be resized as it grows. Think if the line was 1GB of data. – drescherjm Jun 1 '20 at 21:12
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    none of them are efficient – bolov Jun 1 '20 at 21:13
  • 1
    for(int i=0;j=len-1;i<len;i++;j--) - I tend to say that this does not even compile... – Stephan Lechner Jun 1 '20 at 21:17
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    FYI, strings (and other containers too) provide a constructor that accepts two iterators, so instead using a loop you can just write std::string(str1.rbegin(), str1.rend()). – t.niese Jun 1 '20 at 21:38
1

I would say that both are almost the same, but as mentioned in the comments, the line:

str2.push_back(*it);

Is actually very inefficient, since std::string may copy the existing string to a new location in the memory, and then append the next char to the string, which is wasteful.

But I am wondering, why to create the copy in the first place?

It is very simple to run both from start to end, and from end to start to check it out, meaning:


bool is_polindrom(const std::string& str)
{
    for (std::size_t idx = 0, len = str.length(); idx < len / 2; ++idx)
    {
        if (str[idx] != str[len - 1 - idx])
        {
            return false;
        }
    }

    return true;
}

Running the code with:


int main()
{
    const std::string right1 = "MADAM";
    const std::string right2 = "MAAM";
    const std::string wrong1 = "MADAAM";
    const std::string wrong2 = "MEDAM";

    std::cout << "MADAM result is: " << is_polindrom(right1) << std::endl;
    std::cout << "MAAM result is: " << is_polindrom(right2) << std::endl;
    std::cout << "MADAAM result is: " << is_polindrom(wrong1) << std::endl;
    std::cout << "MEDAM result is: " << is_polindrom(wrong2) << std::endl;
}

Will yield:

MADAM result is: 1

MAAM result is: 1

MADAAM result is: 0

MEDAM result is: 0

You don't need extra memory in this case, since it is possible to iterate over a string from the end to the beginning, and you need to run on it exactly once (and notice that I stop when idx >= len / 2 since you don't really need to check each letter twice!).

5

In theory the code from your instructor is more efficient, but both examples have issues.

With your instructors code the main issue is the use of

int len=(int)str.length();

In this example, it is okay because we know the size of the string will fit in a int, but if you were getting a string from an outside source, this could be a problem. A std::string using an unsigned integer type to store the size of the string and that means you can have a string who's size is larger then what can fit in an int. If that were to happen, then code is not going to work correctly.

With your code you a avoid all that, which is great, but you also leave some performance on the table. In theory your code of

for(it=str1.rbegin(); it!= str1.rend(); it++)
{
    str2.push_back(*it);

}

is going to cause str2 to have multiple buffer allocations and copies from the old buffer to the new buffer as it grows. This is a lot of extra work that you don't need to do since you already know how much space you need to allocate. Having

str2.reserve(str1.size() + 1);

before the loop pre-allocates all the space you need so you don't have those potential performance hits.

Then we come to the fact that both of your examples are using a second string. You don't need another string to check for a palindrome. What you can do is just check and see if the first and last characters are the same, and if they are move on to the first+1 and last-1 character and so on until you reach the middle or they don't match. You can do that using a construct like

bool is_palindrome = true;
for (auto start = str.begin(), end = str.end() - 1; 
     start < end && is_palindrome; 
     ++start, --end)
{
    if (*start != *end)
        is_palindrom = false
}
if (is_palindrome)
    std::cout << "palindrome\n";
else
    std::cout << "not a pallindrome\n";
5
  • upvoted since it really answers the question and explains what is more efficient, without using "black-box" functions! Very similar to my approach :) – Kerek Jun 1 '20 at 21:40
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    @Kerek Thanks. +1 to yourself as well since you actually get into an explanation. It's one thing to give efficient code, and another in explaining why it is efficient. – NathanOliver Jun 1 '20 at 21:43
  • Let me start by saying i like your solution to the teachers. That being said, the first part of the post, while true, is something i disagree with. You're left with two options, either let unsigned types permeate your codebase, or have signed/unisgned mismatch everywhere which is UB. You are not likely to ever need more than an int, so I prefer to assert and cast rather than let the std committees decision rule my code. in the rare instance where you DO need more than an int? Sure use the unsigned type, just try not to let it effect anything else in your codebase. – Taekahn Jun 1 '20 at 22:05
  • @Taekahn Or just don't use the size at all. In my example code for instance I don't use the size of the string at all so there is no worry about mixing signed and unsigned integers. – NathanOliver Jun 1 '20 at 22:18
  • yeah, that's why i said i like your solution :) – Taekahn Jun 1 '20 at 22:31
4

The simplest and most efficient way (no copying required) would be something like this:

inline bool is_palindrome(const std::string& u) {
    return std::equal(u.begin(), std::next(u.begin(), u.length() / 2), u.rbegin());
}
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    I was aiming for comparing two strings, if they are a palindrome of each other. For a single string it's simply is_palindrome(u, u). – jvd Jun 1 '20 at 21:22
  • @jvd: Since this method is confusing and overkill for the given problem, consider also posting a simpler version of the code, which is simply std::equal(u.begin(), u.end(), u.rbegin()); – Mooing Duck Jun 1 '20 at 21:23
  • Updated the function to accept a single parameter only. – jvd Jun 1 '20 at 21:24
  • Somewhat I don't find it very informative to someone that just learns how to code, even if it is the most elegant way to do that. – Kerek Jun 1 '20 at 21:38
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    @Kerek the functions of the algorithm header exist to be used. But I agree that the answer could explain the individual parts. – t.niese Jun 1 '20 at 21:46

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