90

Method to copy entire directory contents to another directory in java or groovy?

1
  • You want a command line tool or code? Jun 2, 2011 at 12:51

10 Answers 10

124

FileUtils.copyDirectory()

Copies a whole directory to a new location preserving the file dates. This method copies the specified directory and all its child directories and files to the specified destination. The destination is the new location and name of the directory.

The destination directory is created if it does not exist. If the destination directory did exist, then this method merges the source with the destination, with the source taking precedence.

To do so, here's the example code

String source = "C:/your/source";
File srcDir = new File(source);

String destination = "C:/your/destination";
File destDir = new File(destination);

try {
    FileUtils.copyDirectory(srcDir, destDir);
} catch (IOException e) {
    e.printStackTrace();
}
8
  • 24
    In my case I had some subfolders and I also wanted to copy the structure, and found the method FileUtils.copyDirectoryStructure(). Maybe this helps some other people too. Oct 4, 2013 at 21:40
  • 4
    What about the JAVA API NIO 2 ? I tried Files.copy(Path, Path) but it seems to not do the same job.
    – herau
    May 6, 2014 at 9:31
  • @Ethan Leroy what difference between copyDirectoryStructure and copyDirectory ? Aug 9, 2014 at 20:53
  • 1
    As you can see here, "Directories can be copied. However, files inside the directory are not copied, so the new directory is empty" docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/essential/io/copy.html
    – NoBugs
    Jan 22, 2015 at 7:16
  • 5
    import org.apache.commons.io.FileUtils
    – Jean Bob
    Jun 14, 2018 at 16:32
34

The following is an example of using JDK7.

public class CopyFileVisitor extends SimpleFileVisitor<Path> {
    private final Path targetPath;
    private Path sourcePath = null;
    public CopyFileVisitor(Path targetPath) {
        this.targetPath = targetPath;
    }

    @Override
    public FileVisitResult preVisitDirectory(final Path dir,
    final BasicFileAttributes attrs) throws IOException {
        if (sourcePath == null) {
            sourcePath = dir;
        } else {
        Files.createDirectories(targetPath.resolve(sourcePath
                    .relativize(dir)));
        }
        return FileVisitResult.CONTINUE;
    }

    @Override
    public FileVisitResult visitFile(final Path file,
    final BasicFileAttributes attrs) throws IOException {
    Files.copy(file,
        targetPath.resolve(sourcePath.relativize(file)));
    return FileVisitResult.CONTINUE;
    }
}

To use the visitor do the following

Files.walkFileTree(sourcePath, new CopyFileVisitor(targetPath));

If you'd rather just inline everything (not too efficient if you use it often, but good for quickies)

    final Path targetPath = // target
    final Path sourcePath = // source
    Files.walkFileTree(sourcePath, new SimpleFileVisitor<Path>() {
        @Override
        public FileVisitResult preVisitDirectory(final Path dir,
                final BasicFileAttributes attrs) throws IOException {
            Files.createDirectories(targetPath.resolve(sourcePath
                    .relativize(dir)));
            return FileVisitResult.CONTINUE;
        }

        @Override
        public FileVisitResult visitFile(final Path file,
                final BasicFileAttributes attrs) throws IOException {
            Files.copy(file,
                    targetPath.resolve(sourcePath.relativize(file)));
            return FileVisitResult.CONTINUE;
        }
    });
3
  • There is actually a visitor by the oracle guys for this job: docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/essential/io/examples/Copy.java - what are the differences with yours ? Apr 17, 2014 at 16:13
  • 2
    Mine just copies the files, theirs is a full app with copying of attributes. Apr 17, 2014 at 20:22
  • Very nice solution! I'll point out to other readers one of the not so obvious advantage to this approach. This approach can be used to copy files in and out of jars, if you use a jar FileSystem path. Feb 12, 2022 at 16:37
16

With Groovy, you can leverage Ant to do:

new AntBuilder().copy( todir:'/path/to/destination/folder' ) {
  fileset( dir:'/path/to/src/folder' )
}

AntBuilder is part of the distribution and the automatic imports list which means it is directly available for any groovy code.

2
  • 8
    You probably can in Java, but it is like using a sledge-hammer to crack a walnut.
    – Stephen C
    Jun 2, 2011 at 13:45
  • 1
    Perhaps, but in groovy AntBuilder is part of the distribution and the automatic imports list which means it is directly available for any groovy code as written in the answer. Feb 6, 2017 at 11:52
13
public static void copyFolder(File source, File destination)
{
    if (source.isDirectory())
    {
        if (!destination.exists())
        {
            destination.mkdirs();
        }

        String files[] = source.list();

        for (String file : files)
        {
            File srcFile = new File(source, file);
            File destFile = new File(destination, file);

            copyFolder(srcFile, destFile);
        }
    }
    else
    {
        InputStream in = null;
        OutputStream out = null;

        try
        {
            in = new FileInputStream(source);
            out = new FileOutputStream(destination);

            byte[] buffer = new byte[1024];

            int length;
            while ((length = in.read(buffer)) > 0)
            {
                out.write(buffer, 0, length);
            }
        }
        catch (Exception e)
        {
            try
            {
                in.close();
            }
            catch (IOException e1)
            {
                e1.printStackTrace();
            }

            try
            {
                out.close();
            }
            catch (IOException e1)
            {
                e1.printStackTrace();
            }
        }
    }
}
5
  • Is it Groovy? It looks even more C++ than Java. :-). But it seems correct. +1. It is good if we are copying and simultaneously doing some work with text being copied.
    – Gangnus
    Oct 23, 2015 at 16:28
  • Works, simple, good! The only difference between this solution and perhaps others is the date modified and date created of the copy are set to the current time, but sometimes that's what you want anyway. Oct 24, 2017 at 14:14
  • 3
    Call me old fashioned, but it's great to see curly brackets on new lines. I'm an ex C and C++ programmer and, even though I've written in Java for 20 years, I still write code like this. Much more readable!
    – DAB
    Mar 12, 2021 at 16:34
  • I think this is the clearer approach. What about with a progress bar ? Oct 8, 2021 at 14:22
  • life saver I use it in kotlin WORKS PERFECT +2 Jan 19, 2022 at 15:10
8

This is my piece of Groovy code for that. Tested.

private static void copyLargeDir(File dirFrom, File dirTo){
    // creation the target dir
    if (!dirTo.exists()){
        dirTo.mkdir();
    }
    // copying the daughter files
    dirFrom.eachFile(FILES){File source ->
        File target = new File(dirTo,source.getName());
        target.bytes = source.bytes;
    }
    // copying the daughter dirs - recursion
    dirFrom.eachFile(DIRECTORIES){File source ->
        File target = new File(dirTo,source.getName());
        copyLargeDir(source, target)
    }
}
3
  • 2
    How is this better than FileUtils.copyDirectory()?
    – doelleri
    Oct 23, 2015 at 16:17
  • 4
    @doelleri It is better in two points - I needn't install any additional jars or put references in Maven, struggling with versions. BTW, that "answer" should have appropriate include line and reference to the jar. The second reason - if I want to have some serious filtration in daughter dirs, only my code will help. The third reason - here is the site for programmers, not merely SW users. :-)
    – Gangnus
    Oct 23, 2015 at 16:26
  • You can replace FILES with groovy.io.FileType.FILES and DIRECTORIES with groovy.io.FileType.DIRECTORIES if you are wondering where those come from. Jul 27, 2020 at 14:57
5
4
  • 19
    Clarify "Java 7: take a look at java.nio.file.Files" - does not actually answer the question Apr 17, 2014 at 15:30
  • 7
    While Files.copy supports directories, it does not copy the contents of the directories.
    – Max
    Nov 11, 2015 at 12:58
  • 2
    apache is the best. +1
    – OhadR
    Dec 24, 2015 at 8:23
  • 2
    @OhadR Instead of "better" I'd say simpler.
    – Stephan
    Feb 23, 2016 at 23:45
4

With coming in of Java NIO, below is a possible solution too

With Java 9:

private static void copyDir(String src, String dest, boolean overwrite) {
    try {
        Files.walk(Paths.get(src)).forEach(a -> {
            Path b = Paths.get(dest, a.toString().substring(src.length()));
            try {
                if (!a.toString().equals(src))
                    Files.copy(a, b, overwrite ? new CopyOption[]{StandardCopyOption.REPLACE_EXISTING} : new CopyOption[]{});
            } catch (IOException e) {
                e.printStackTrace();
            }
        });
    } catch (IOException e) {
        //permission issue
        e.printStackTrace();
    }
}

With Java 7:

import java.io.IOException;
import java.nio.file.FileAlreadyExistsException;
import java.nio.file.Files;
import java.nio.file.Path;
import java.nio.file.Paths;
import java.util.function.Consumer;
import java.util.stream.Stream;

public class Test {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Path sourceParentFolder = Paths.get("/sourceParent");
        Path destinationParentFolder = Paths.get("/destination/");

        try {
            Stream<Path> allFilesPathStream = Files.walk(sourceParentFolder);
            Consumer<? super Path> action = new Consumer<Path>(){

                @Override
                public void accept(Path t) {
                    try {
                        String destinationPath = t.toString().replaceAll(sourceParentFolder.toString(), destinationParentFolder.toString());
                        Files.copy(t, Paths.get(destinationPath));
                    } 
                    catch(FileAlreadyExistsException e){
                        //TODO do acc to business needs
                    }
                    catch (IOException e) {
                        // TODO Auto-generated catch block
                        e.printStackTrace();
                    }

                }

            };
            allFilesPathStream.forEach(action );

        } catch(FileAlreadyExistsException e) {
            //file already exists and unable to copy
        } catch (IOException e) {
            //permission issue
            e.printStackTrace();
        }

    }

}
6
  • 1
    why the downvote.. ? Please suggest if some improvement is desired. Jun 22, 2017 at 5:57
  • The string replace may cause unintended side effects. You should only replace the very beginning, which we know exists, and we know it's length, so you could just use: Paths.get(dest, a.toString().substring(src.length())). Also, there are a few optimizations you could make: the duplicate FileAlreadyExistsException clause could be removed, you only have one usage of both the source and destination Path objects so there's no need to have a var for each
    – Charlie
    Feb 6, 2018 at 6:45
  • Agreed, thankyou @Charlie Feb 6, 2018 at 7:34
  • I would have suggested swapping out some boilerplate for lambdas but that will hurt people looking for Java 7 (6?) answers.
    – Charlie
    Feb 6, 2018 at 7:40
  • I was going to add my own answer but this question was closed as a dupe (even though it isn't). I'll add to your answer with my Java 9 version. Delete it if you don't like it ;)
    – Charlie
    Feb 6, 2018 at 8:02
3

Neither FileUtils.copyDirectory() nor Archimedes's answer copy directory attributes (file owner, permissions, modification times, etc).

https://stackoverflow.com/a/18691793/14731 provides a complete JDK7 solution that does precisely that.

1
0

With regard to Java, there is no such method in the standard API. In Java 7, the java.nio.file.Files class will provide a copy convenience method.

References

  1. The Java Tutorials

  2. Copying files from one directory to another in Java

1
  • Files.copy does not support copying directory contents.
    – Max
    Nov 11, 2015 at 12:58
0

If you're open to using a 3rd party library, check out javaxt-core. The javaxt.io.Directory class can be used to copy directories like this:

javaxt.io.Directory input = new javaxt.io.Directory("/source");
javaxt.io.Directory output = new javaxt.io.Directory("/destination");
input.copyTo(output, true); //true to overwrite any existing files

You can also provide a file filter to specify which files you want to copy. There are more examples here:

http://javaxt.com/javaxt-core/io/Directory/Directory_Copy

1
  • but how to add it to android project? where is dependency? Jan 21, 2022 at 7:25

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