108

I'm trying to set a timeout on an HTTP client that uses http.request with no luck. So far what I did is this:

var options = { ... }
var req = http.request(options, function(res) {
  // Usual stuff: on(data), on(end), chunks, etc...
}

/* This does not work TOO MUCH... sometimes the socket is not ready (undefined) expecially on rapid sequences of requests */
req.socket.setTimeout(myTimeout);  
req.socket.on('timeout', function() {
  req.abort();
});

req.write('something');
req.end();

Any hints?

1

9 Answers 9

94

2019 Update

There are various ways to handle this more elegantly now. Please see some other answers on this thread. Tech moves fast so answers can often become out of date fairly quickly. My answer will still work but it's worth looking at alternatives as well.

2012 Answer

Using your code, the issue is that you haven't waited for a socket to be assigned to the request before attempting to set stuff on the socket object. It's all async so:

var options = { ... }
var req = http.request(options, function(res) {
  // Usual stuff: on(data), on(end), chunks, etc...
});

req.on('socket', function (socket) {
    socket.setTimeout(myTimeout);  
    socket.on('timeout', function() {
        req.abort();
    });
});

req.on('error', function(err) {
    if (err.code === "ECONNRESET") {
        console.log("Timeout occurs");
        //specific error treatment
    }
    //other error treatment
});

req.write('something');
req.end();

The 'socket' event is fired when the request is assigned a socket object.

6
  • This make total sense, indeed. The problem is that now I can't test this particular issue (time passes...). So I can only upvote the answer for now :) Thank you.
    – Claudio
    Mar 29, 2012 at 13:07
  • No worries. Keep in mind this only works on the latest version of node as far as I know. I tested on a previous version (5.0.3-pre) I think and it didn't fire the socket event.
    – Rob Evans
    Mar 29, 2012 at 16:21
  • 1
    The other way to handle this is to use a bog-standard setTimeout call. You'll need to keep hold of the setTimeout id with: var id = setTimeout(...); so that you can cancel it if you recieve an on data etc. A good way is to store it in the request object itself then clearTimeout if you get some data.
    – Rob Evans
    Mar 29, 2012 at 16:23
  • 1
    You're missing ); at the end of req.on. Since it's not 6 characters, I can't edit it for you.
    – JR Smith
    May 7, 2015 at 15:57
  • 2
    Could you mention one more elegant solution? Saying there's more elegant solutions isn't super helpful without more info
    – B T
    Jun 12, 2020 at 17:39
53

Just to clarify the answer above:

Now it is possible to use timeout option and the corresponding request event:

// set the desired timeout in options
const options = {
    //...
    timeout: 3000,
};

// create a request
const request = http.request(options, response => {
    // your callback here
});

// use its "timeout" event to abort the request
request.on('timeout', () => {
    request.destroy();
});

See the docs: enter image description here

6
  • 1
    Wonder if this is any different than just setTimeout(req.abort.bind(req), 3000); May 31, 2019 at 0:53
  • @AlexanderMills, then you probably want to clear the timeout manually, when the request worked fine. Jun 14, 2019 at 13:48
  • 11
    Note that this is strictly the connect timeout, once the socket is established it has no effect. So this will not help with a server that keeps the socket open for too long (you will still need to roll your own with setTimeout). timeout : A number specifying the socket timeout in milliseconds. This will set the timeout before the socket is connected.
    – UpTheCreek
    Oct 31, 2019 at 16:53
  • 2
    This is what I'm looking for on a hung connection attempt. Hung connections can happen a good bit when trying to access a port on a server that isn't listening. BTW, the API has changed to request.destroy (abort is deprecated.) Also, this is different from setTimeout
    – dturvene
    Jun 27, 2020 at 3:21
  • 1
    As @dturvene said, use request.destroy which will trigger the request's "error" handler with an ECONNRESET event. You can pass your own custom error to request.destroy as well.
    – jowo
    Jan 29 at 14:51
43

At this moment there is a method to do this directly on the request object:

request.setTimeout(timeout, function() {
    request.abort();
});

This is a shortcut method that binds to the socket event and then creates the timeout.

Reference: Node.js v0.8.8 Manual & Documentation

3
  • 4
    request.setTimeout "sets the socket to timeout after timeout milliseconds of inactivity on the socket." Me thinks this question is about timing out the request regardless of activity.
    – ostergaard
    Jan 20, 2013 at 14:00
  • 1
    Please note that, the same as in the answers below which use the involved socket directly, the req.abort() causes an error event, which should be handled by on('error' ) etc.
    – KLoozen
    Jan 10, 2016 at 17:31
  • 6
    request.setTimeout won't abort the request, we need to call abort manually in the timeout callback.
    – Udhaya
    Feb 23, 2016 at 5:52
20

The Rob Evans anwser works correctly for me but when I use request.abort(), it occurs to throw a socket hang up error which stays unhandled.

I had to add an error handler for the request object :

var options = { ... }
var req = http.request(options, function(res) {
  // Usual stuff: on(data), on(end), chunks, etc...
}

req.on('socket', function (socket) {
    socket.setTimeout(myTimeout);  
    socket.on('timeout', function() {
        req.abort();
    });
}

req.on('error', function(err) {
    if (err.code === "ECONNRESET") {
        console.log("Timeout occurs");
        //specific error treatment
    }
    //other error treatment
});

req.write('something');
req.end();
2
  • 3
    where is the myTimeout function? (edit: the docs say: Same as binding to the timeout event nodejs.org/api/…) Sep 20, 2016 at 21:08
  • Notice that ECONNRESET can happen in both cases: client closes socket and server closes connection. To determine if it was done by client by calling abort() there is spceial abort event
    – Kirill
    Nov 8, 2016 at 9:16
11

There is simpler method.

Instead of using setTimeout or working with socket directly,
We can use 'timeout' in the 'options' in client uses

Below is code of both server and client, in 3 parts.

Module and options part:

'use strict';

// Source: https://github.com/nodejs/node/blob/master/test/parallel/test-http-client-timeout-option.js

const assert = require('assert');
const http = require('http');

const options = {
    host: '127.0.0.1', // server uses this
    port: 3000, // server uses this

    method: 'GET', // client uses this
    path: '/', // client uses this
    timeout: 2000 // client uses this, timesout in 2 seconds if server does not respond in time
};

Server part:

function startServer() {
    console.log('startServer');

    const server = http.createServer();
    server
            .listen(options.port, options.host, function () {
                console.log('Server listening on http://' + options.host + ':' + options.port);
                console.log('');

                // server is listening now
                // so, let's start the client

                startClient();
            });
}

Client part:

function startClient() {
    console.log('startClient');

    const req = http.request(options);

    req.on('close', function () {
        console.log("got closed!");
    });

    req.on('timeout', function () {
        console.log("timeout! " + (options.timeout / 1000) + " seconds expired");

        // Source: https://github.com/nodejs/node/blob/master/test/parallel/test-http-client-timeout-option.js#L27
        req.destroy();
    });

    req.on('error', function (e) {
        // Source: https://github.com/nodejs/node/blob/master/lib/_http_outgoing.js#L248
        if (req.connection.destroyed) {
            console.log("got error, req.destroy() was called!");
            return;
        }

        console.log("got error! ", e);
    });

    // Finish sending the request
    req.end();
}


startServer();

If you put all the above 3 parts in one file, "a.js", and then run:

node a.js

then, output will be:

startServer
Server listening on http://127.0.0.1:3000

startClient
timeout! 2 seconds expired
got closed!
got error, req.destroy() was called!

Hope that helps.

1
  • Since request.abort() is deprecated, this is the approach I use in production. Note that if you pass your own Error to request.destroy(), it will be sent to the 'error' handler. Otherwise, the 'error' handler will be sent an 'ECONNRESET' event.
    – jowo
    Jan 29 at 14:48
2

For me - here is a less confusing way of doing the socket.setTimeout

var request=require('https').get(
    url
   ,function(response){
        var r='';
        response.on('data',function(chunk){
            r+=chunk;
            });
        response.on('end',function(){
            console.dir(r);            //end up here if everything is good!
            });
        }).on('error',function(e){
            console.dir(e.message);    //end up here if the result returns an error
            });
request.on('error',function(e){
    console.dir(e);                    //end up here if a timeout
    });
request.on('socket',function(socket){
    socket.setTimeout(1000,function(){
        request.abort();                //causes error event ↑
        });
    });
0
2

Elaborating on the answer @douwe here is where you would put a timeout on a http request.

// TYPICAL REQUEST
var req = https.get(http_options, function (res) {                                                                                                             
    var data = '';                                                                                                                                             

    res.on('data', function (chunk) { data += chunk; });                                                                                                                                                                
    res.on('end', function () {
        if (res.statusCode === 200) { /* do stuff with your data */}
        else { /* Do other codes */}
    });
});       
req.on('error', function (err) { /* More serious connection problems. */ }); 

// TIMEOUT PART
req.setTimeout(1000, function() {                                                                                                                              
    console.log("Server connection timeout (after 1 second)");                                                                                                                  
    req.abort();                                                                                                                                               
});

this.abort() is also fine.

0

You should pass the reference to request like below

var options = { ... }
var req = http.request(options, function(res) {
  // Usual stuff: on(data), on(end), chunks, etc...
});

req.setTimeout(60000, function(){
    this.abort();
});
req.write('something');
req.end();

Request error event will get triggered

req.on("error", function(e){
       console.log("Request Error : "+JSON.stringify(e));
  });

2
  • Adding bind(req) didn't change anything for me. What does bind do in this case?
    – SpiRail
    Apr 3, 2018 at 10:10
  • IMHO i think this makes things a lot more confusing. Using req instead of this makes things a little less complex.
    – Elmer
    Jul 6, 2021 at 7:58
-2

Curious, what happens if you use straight net.sockets instead? Here's some sample code I put together for testing purposes:

var net = require('net');

function HttpRequest(host, port, path, method) {
  return {
    headers: [],
    port: 80,
    path: "/",
    method: "GET",
    socket: null,
    _setDefaultHeaders: function() {

      this.headers.push(this.method + " " + this.path + " HTTP/1.1");
      this.headers.push("Host: " + this.host);
    },
    SetHeaders: function(headers) {
      for (var i = 0; i < headers.length; i++) {
        this.headers.push(headers[i]);
      }
    },
    WriteHeaders: function() {
      if(this.socket) {
        this.socket.write(this.headers.join("\r\n"));
        this.socket.write("\r\n\r\n"); // to signal headers are complete
      }
    },
    MakeRequest: function(data) {
      if(data) {
        this.socket.write(data);
      }

      this.socket.end();
    },
    SetupRequest: function() {
      this.host = host;

      if(path) {
        this.path = path;
      }
      if(port) {
        this.port = port;
      }
      if(method) {
        this.method = method;
      }

      this._setDefaultHeaders();

      this.socket = net.createConnection(this.port, this.host);
    }
  }
};

var request = HttpRequest("www.somesite.com");
request.SetupRequest();

request.socket.setTimeout(30000, function(){
  console.error("Connection timed out.");
});

request.socket.on("data", function(data) {
  console.log(data.toString('utf8'));
});

request.WriteHeaders();
request.MakeRequest();
5
  • If I use the socket timeout, and I issue two requests one after another (without waiting the first to finish), the second request has the socket undefined (at least at the moment I try to set the timeout).. maybe there should be something like on("ready") on the socket... I don't know.
    – Claudio
    Jun 2, 2011 at 17:18
  • @Claudio Can you update your code to show multiple request being made?
    – onteria_
    Jun 2, 2011 at 17:25
  • 1
    Of course... it's a bit long and I used paste2.org if this is not a problem: paste2.org/p/1448487
    – Claudio
    Jun 2, 2011 at 17:42
  • @Claudio Hmm okay, setting up a test environment and writing some test code is going to take about, so my reply might come sometime tomorrow (Pacific Time) as an FYI
    – onteria_
    Jun 2, 2011 at 17:53
  • @Claudio actually taking a look your code doesn't seem to match up with your error. It's saying that setTimeout is being called on an undefined value, but the way you're calling it is through the global version, so there's no way that could be undefined, leaving me rather confused.
    – onteria_
    Jun 3, 2011 at 3:13

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