-1

I am trying to build tree where each node can have infinite children, and propagate some values from root down the tree. I tried multiple ways to achieve that. First was by allocation of each individual node on heap. Then i tried to create vector of Nodes (not pointers to Nodes ) and build tree with Node pointers pointing to elements of that vector. This was faster solution, because I stored nodes in one block of memory I guess. This solution works great but if vector resizes I have to rebuild whole tree again. Third option was to use build tree using indices instead of pointers. Only time index is invalidated is when I remove element from vector, but it is only one node so it is no big deal ( swap last element with removed one ). This solution is the slowest one on my machine, in debug mode ( using visual studio 2019) other two solutions perform a lot better in debug mode. But when i switch to release mode with optimization, this solution perform similiar to the solution where i used pointers to elements of vector. I read that compiler might use pointers directly instead of indices when optimization is on. But I can not really answer that. So my question is what is really going on? And can I assume that speed of code using indices will be almost same all the time?

Node using pointers:

struct Node 
{
    void SetParent(Node* parent)
    {
        Parent = parent;
        NextSibling = parent->FirstChild;
        parent->FirstChild = this;
    }

    void Propagate(float x,float y)
    { 
        Node* tmp = this;
        while (tmp)
        {
            tmp->X += x;
            tmp->Y += y;
            if (tmp->FirstChild)
                tmp->FirstChild->Propagate(tmp->X,tmp->Y);

            tmp = tmp->NextSibling;
        }
    }
    float X, Y;
    std::string Name;

    Node* Parent = nullptr;
    Node* FirstChild = nullptr;
    Node* NextSibling = nullptr;
}

Node using indices:

struct Node
{
    void SetParent(std::vector<Node>& list,int parent)
    {
        Parent = parent;
        NextSibling = list[parent].FirstChild;
        list[parent].FirstChild = Index;
    }

    void Propagate(std::vector<Node>& list, int index, float x, float y)
    {
        while (index != -1)
        {
            list[index].X += x;
            list[index].Y += y;
            if (list[index].FirstChild != -1)
            {
                list[list[index].FirstChild].Propagate(list, list[index].FirstChild, list[index].X, 
                 list[index].Y);
            }
            index = list[index].NextSibling;
        }
    }



    float X, Y;
    std::string Name;
    int Index = -1;
    int Parent = -1;
    int FirstChild = -1;
    int NextSibling = -1;
};

  • 2
    Comparing performance using non-optimized builds isn't really useful. Compare the release builds. – Ted Lyngmo Jun 2 '20 at 10:43
  • Ted Lyngmo not anwer to my question but thank you. – Šimon Gido Jun 2 '20 at 11:52
  • @ŠimonGido -- The debug build for Visual C++ uses lots of iterator checking. That alone slows down many containers – PaulMcKenzie Jun 2 '20 at 12:33
2

You'we been told in the comments that comparing the performance of the debug builds is not really useful. That statement is correct, and the issue here is not that release builds do something magical to access your vectors, but that debug builds are slowed down by a lot of verification and instrumentation code that does not get into the release builds.

Consider: Depending on the stdc++ implementation, T operator[](size_t index) const can contain range checking code in debug build that you simply step around when you directly use pointers (IIRC, that how things work in Visual Studio stdc++ implementation).

Naturally, your debug build using pointer accesses will be faster, but you have already found many of the pitfalls.

Summa summarum: using indices in your case is perfectly fine. They won't hurt performance. In scenarios like these it's typically not the indexing that hurts, but how coherent those memory accesses are, are you trashing your CPU cache, etc.

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