170

I have a fragment (F1) with a public method like this

public void asd() {
    if (getActivity() == null) {
        Log.d("yes","it is null");
    }
}

and yes when I call it (from the Activity), it it is null...

FragmentTransaction transaction1 = getSupportFragmentManager().beginTransaction();
F1 f1 = new F1();
transaction1.replace(R.id.upperPart, f1);
transaction1.commit();
f1.asd();

It must be something that I am doing very wrong, but I don't know what that is

  • I'm not sure if there was just an error when you pasted it into this post, but you need parenthesis after getActivity(). Also, how are you instantiating the fragment? Do you have it in your layout.xml? – CaseyB Jun 2 '11 at 13:41
  • Where does the second code fragment belong to? To the oncreate()-method of the Activity? And have you already called setContentView() ? – Franziskus Karsunke Jun 2 '11 at 13:44
  • R.id.upperPar is an element in the layout, so it supposed to be replaced with the fragment, but that is not my problem. I do not understand why I get null when I call getActivity() in custom fragment methods, let say in onActivityCreated method getActivity is the actual activity not null – Lukap Jun 2 '11 at 13:58
  • the problem it is not in the layouts, the app works good but why I get null for the getActivity ?, btw all the elements including the fragment it is rendered like it should not issues here – Lukap Jun 2 '11 at 13:59
  • You should call this method: f1.asd(); in the onActivityCreated method which is to be overridden in your fragment class. – Namrata Bagerwal May 1 '17 at 6:53

13 Answers 13

154

commit schedules the transaction, i.e. it doesn't happen straightaway but is scheduled as work on the main thread the next time the main thread is ready.

I'd suggest adding an

onAttach(Activity activity)

method to your Fragment and putting a break point on it and seeing when it is called relative to your call to asd(). You'll see that it is called after the method where you make the call to asd() exits. The onAttach call is where the Fragment is attached to its activity and from this point getActivity() will return non-null (nb there is also an onDetach() call).

  • 4
    I didn't understand how you can solve your problem. If my getActivity() isn't stille ready, how can I get the reference of FragmentActivity object? – CeccoCQ Aug 8 '11 at 10:12
  • 2
    @Vivek I don't know quite what you want to achieve. If you need the Fragment to display a dialog straightaway then have it do what it needs to do on creation, e.g. in its onCreateView or onActivityCreated methods. I question why asd() needs to be called when it does in the questions posting. – PJL Mar 27 '12 at 12:47
  • 2
    onAttach deprecated – ArMo 372 Aug 18 '16 at 7:36
  • 6
    onAttach(Activity mActivity) seems to be depreciated.. any workaround for this – ashish.n Feb 27 '17 at 11:42
  • 2
    API 24 introduced commitNow() – Nicolas Mar 4 '17 at 16:47
84

The best to get rid of this is to keep activity reference when onAttach is called and use the activity reference wherever needed, for e.g.

@Override
public void onAttach(Context context) {
    super.onAttach(activity);
    mContext = context;
}

@Override
public void onDetach() {
    super.onDetach();
    mContext = null;
}
  • 33
    Should we set mActivity = null onDetach() ? – Oliver Pearmain Apr 23 '14 at 10:54
  • 5
    @OliverPearmain if you will do it in onDetach() then there will no profit. You have to nullify it in onDestory(). Furthermore you have to hold it in WeakRefernce. – Kirill Popov Apr 29 '15 at 15:58
  • I am nullifying it in both onDestroy() and onDetach() because onDestroy() is not guaranteed to be called. – Mohammed Ali Aug 26 '15 at 17:20
  • 7
    Are we leaking the Activity if we don't nullify it in onDestroy()? – Mohammed Ali Aug 26 '15 at 17:21
  • 2
    According to developer.android.com/intl/zh-tw/guide/components/…, the onAttach() is called before calling the onCreateView(). But I still get a NullPointerException while I'm calling getActivity() in onCreateView(). How could that happen? – Kimi Chiu Dec 18 '15 at 2:16
73

This happened when you call getActivity() in another thread that finished after the fragment has been removed. The typical case is calling getActivity() (ex. for a Toast) when an HTTP request finished (in onResponse for example).

To avoid this, you can define a field name mActivity and use it instead of getActivity(). This field can be initialized in onAttach() method of Fragment as following:

@Override
public void onAttach(Context context) {
    super.onAttach(context);

    if (context instanceof Activity){
        mActivity =(Activity) context;
    }
}

In my projects, I usually define a base class for all of my Fragments with this feature:

public abstract class BaseFragment extends Fragment {

    protected FragmentActivity mActivity;

    @Override
public void onAttach(Context context) {
    super.onAttach(context);

    if (context instanceof Activity){
        mActivity =(Activity) context;
    }
}
}

Happy coding,

  • 17
    shall we set mActivity=null; in onDetach()? – Bharat Dodeja Apr 16 '15 at 16:38
  • This worked for me. – Bharat Dodeja Apr 16 '15 at 17:08
  • This worked well – Erick Aug 11 '15 at 3:21
  • 3
    @BharatDodeja should we set mActivity = null onDetach? Did you find out? – SLearner Jun 22 '16 at 16:21
  • 4
    This is going to leak without nulling out activity. – Darek Deoniziak Jul 2 '16 at 5:34
16

Since Android API level 23, onAttach(Activity activity) has been deprecated. You need to use onAttach(Context context). http://developer.android.com/reference/android/app/Fragment.html#onAttach(android.app.Activity)

Activity is a context so if you can simply check the context is an Activity and cast it if necessary.

@Override
public void onAttach(Context context) {
    super.onAttach(context);

    Activity a;

    if (context instanceof Activity){
        a=(Activity) context;
    }

}
  • How to use that – ARR.s Jul 26 '17 at 18:18
11

The other answers that suggest keeping a reference to the activity in onAttach are just suggesting a bandaid to the real problem. When getActivity returns null it means that the Fragment is not attached to the Activity. Most commonly this happens when the Activity has gone away due to rotation or the Activity being finished, but the Fragment has some kind of callback listener. When the listener gets called if you need to do something with the Activity but the Activity is gone there isn't much you can do. In your code you should just check getActivity() != null and if it's not there then don't do anything. If you keep a reference to the Activity that is gone you are preventing the Activity from being garbage collected. Any UI things you might try to do won't be seen by the user. I can imagine some situations where in the callback listener you might want to have a Context for something non-UI related, in those cases it probably makes more sense to get the Application context. Note that the only reason that the onAttach trick isn't a big memory leak is because normally after the callback listener executes it won't be needed anymore and can be garbage collected along with the Fragment, all its View's and the Activity context. If you setRetainInstance(true) there is a bigger chance of a memory leak because the Activity field will also be retained but after rotation that could be the previous Activity not the current one.

  • 1
    This is exactly my problem. I have a fragment that does a process -> then an ad is shown -> and then the proess continues. In some devices after returning from the ad (through a listener to the ad events) getActivity() is null. But I need to continue doing the other part of the work to finish the job. Do you mean there's no solution to this? – Notbad May 29 '17 at 13:25
  • This is exactly what I am facing. I have an Activity interface in a fragment where I do some billing things. After the payment is done, I want to use the interface to do something, but the interface has been null. – Freddie Jan 25 at 0:27
  • This seems to be the correct general answer to 100s of SO questions to this topic. – Manuel May 24 at 0:32
10

PJL is right. I have used his suggestion and this is what i have done:

  1. defined global variables for fragment:

    private final Object attachingActivityLock = new Object();

    private boolean syncVariable = false;

  2. implemented

@Override
public void onAttach(Activity activity) {
  super.onAttach(activity);
  synchronized (attachingActivityLock) {
      syncVariable = true;
      attachingActivityLock.notifyAll();
  }
}

3 . I wrapped up my function, where I need to call getActivity(), in thread, because if it would run on main thread, i would block the thread with the step 4. and onAttach() would never be called.

    Thread processImage = new Thread(new Runnable() {

        @Override
        public void run() {
            processImage();
        }
    });
    processImage.start();

4 . in my function where I need to call getActivity(), I use this (before the call getActivity())

    synchronized (attachingActivityLock) {
        while(!syncVariable){
            try {
                attachingActivityLock.wait();
            } catch (InterruptedException e) {
                // TODO Auto-generated catch block
                e.printStackTrace();
            }
        }
    }

If you have some UI updates, remember to run them on UI thread. I need to update ImgeView so I did:

image.post(new Runnable() {

    @Override
    public void run() {
        image.setImageBitmap(imageToShow);
    }
});
7

The order in which the callbacks are called after commit():

  1. Whatever method you call manually right after commit()
  2. onAttach()
  3. onCreateView()
  4. onActivityCreated()

I needed to do some work that involved some Views, so onAttach() didn't work for me; it crashed. So I moved part of my code that was setting some params inside a method called right after commit() (1.), then the other part of the code that handled view inside onCreateView() (3.).

2

I am using OkHttp and I just faced this issue.


For the first part @thucnguyen was on the right track.

This happened when you call getActivity() in another thread that finished after the fragment has been removed. The typical case is calling getActivity() (ex. for a Toast) when an HTTP request finished (in onResponse for example).

Some HTTP calls were being executed even after the activity had been closed (because it can take a while for an HTTP request to be completed). I then, through the HttpCallback tried to update some Fragment fields and got a null exception when trying to getActivity().

http.newCall(request).enqueue(new Callback(...
  onResponse(Call call, Response response) {
    ...
    getActivity().runOnUiThread(...) // <-- getActivity() was null when it had been destroyed already

IMO the solution is to prevent callbacks to occur when the fragment is no longer alive anymore (and that's not just with Okhttp).

The fix: Prevention.

If you have a look at the fragment lifecycle (more info here), you'll notice that there's onAttach(Context context) and onDetach() methods. These get called after the Fragment belongs to an activity and just before stop being so respectively.

That means that we can prevent that callback to happen by controlling it in the onDetach method.

@Override
public void onAttach(Context context) {
    super.onAttach(context);

    // Initialize HTTP we're going to use later.
    http = new OkHttpClient.Builder().build();
}

@Override
public void onDetach() {
    super.onDetach();

    // We don't want to receive any more information about the current HTTP calls after this point.
    // With Okhttp we can simply cancel the on-going ones (credits to https://github.com/square/okhttp/issues/2205#issuecomment-169363942).
    for (Call call : http.dispatcher().queuedCalls()) {
        call.cancel();
    }
    for (Call call : http.dispatcher().runningCalls()) {
        call.cancel();
    }
}
1

Do as follows. I think it will be helpful to you.

private boolean isVisibleToUser = false;
private boolean isExecutedOnce = false;


@Override
public View onCreateView(LayoutInflater inflater, ViewGroup container, Bundle savedInstanceState) {
    View root = inflater.inflate(R.layout.fragment_my, container, false);
    if (isVisibleToUser && !isExecutedOnce) {
        executeWithActivity(getActivity());
    }
    return root;
}

@Override
public void setUserVisibleHint(boolean isVisibleToUser) {
    super.setUserVisibleHint(isVisibleToUser);
    this.isVisibleToUser = isVisibleToUser;
    if (isVisibleToUser && getActivity()!=null) {
        isExecutedOnce =true;
        executeWithActivity(getActivity());
    }
}


private void executeWithActivity(Activity activity){
    //Do what you have to do when page is loaded with activity

}
1

Where do you call this function? If you call it in the constructor of Fragment, it will return null.

Just call getActivity() when the method onCreateView() is executed.

0

Those who still have the problem with onAttach(Activity activity), Its just changed to Context -

    @Override
public void onAttach(Context context) {
    super.onAttach(context);
    this.context = context;
}

In most cases saving the context will be enough for you - for example if you want to do getResources() you can do it straight from the context. If you still need to make the context into your Activity do so -

 @Override
public void onAttach(Context context) {
    super.onAttach(context);
    mActivity a; //Your activity class - will probably be a global var.
    if (context instanceof mActivity){
        a=(mActivity) context;
    }
}

As suggested by user1868713.

0

You can using onAttach or if you do not want to put onAttach everywhere then you can put a method that returns ApplicationContext on the main App class :

public class App {
    ...  
    private static Context context;

    @Override
    public void onCreate() {
        super.onCreate();
        context = this;
    }

    public static Context getContext() {
        return context;
    }
    ...
}

After that you can re-use it everywhere in all over your project, like this :

App.getContext().getString(id)

Please let me know if this does not work for you.

0

Another good solution would be using Android's LiveData with MVVM architecture. You would define a LiveData object inside your ViewModel and observe it in your fragment, and when LiveData value is changed, it would notify your observer (fragment in this case) only if your fragment is in active state, so it would be guaranteed that you would make your UI works and access the activity only when your fragment is in active state. This is one advantage that comes with LiveData

Of course when this question was first asked, there was no LiveData. I am leaving this answer here because as I see, there is still this problem and it could be helpful to someone.

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