2

I'm using learning the basic of boost.thread. So far, I can create each thread one by one manually to let them run at the same time. However, when creating by loop, it runs sequentially not concurrency anymore.

#include <iostream>
#include <boost/thread.hpp>
void workerFunc()
{
  boost::posix_time::seconds workTime(3);
  std::cout << "Worker: Running" << '\n';
  boost::this_thread::sleep(workTime);
  std::cout<< "Worker: Finished" << '\n';
}

int main()
{
  std::cout << "main: startup" << '\n';
  boost::thread workerThread(workerFunc);
  std::cout << "main: waiting for thread" << '\n';
  //these are ok
  boost::thread t(workerFunc), t2(workerFunc), t3(workerFunc), t4(workerFunc);     
  t.join();
  t2.join();
  t3.join();
  t4.join();
  //these are not
  for (int i = 0; i < 2; ++i)
    {
      boost::thread z(workerFunc);
      z.join();
    }
  std::cout << "main:done" << '\n';
  return 0;
}
14
  for (int i = 0; i < 2; ++i)
    {
      boost::thread z(workerFunc);
      z.join();
    }

You are starting your thread and then immediately waiting for it to complete!

EDIT

One of several alternative hacks besides thread groups.

  std::vector<boost::thread *> z;

  for (int i = 0; i < 2; ++i)
    z.push_back(new boost::thread(workerFunc));

  for (int i = 0; i < 2; ++i)
  {
      z[i]->join();
      delete z[i];
  }
  • 1
    That should act the same way in Java as well. You're not creating thread #2 before you've already joined thread #1 (or thread #0 for the purists). For some debugging aid, you can get the thread id by calling boost::this_thread::get_id() – Jan Jun 2 '11 at 14:26
  • 2
    @Gracchus A trip down memory lane. Two separate issues. (1) OP was starting a thread and immediately joining (blocking until it finished) it in a loop so only one thread could ever run at a time. (2) OP wanted to put his thread objects in a vector. Vectors make copies of the data inserted into them and you can't copy thread objects. So the second one gets around it by dynamically creating the threads and putting the (copied) pointers to the threads in a vector. The thread objects themselves don't get copied. – Duck Sep 12 '13 at 0:04
  • 2
    @Gracchus It isn't the for loops that block it is the calls within them. The thread constructor does not block. The join does. – Duck Sep 12 '13 at 3:05
  • 1
    The t1..t4 threads run in parallel. His following for loop does not. – Duck Sep 12 '13 at 13:15
  • 1
    @Gracchus I really wouldn't have anything to add. The answer given is exactly correct. – Duck Sep 12 '13 at 17:07
1

Ok I found the answer through the problem of someone else, as well as learn their problem:

How to make boost::thread_group execute a fixed number of parallel threads

  • That's a work around but your compiler should (eventually) support what you originally thought to do. – Duck Jun 2 '11 at 15:03
0

Use shared_ptr

#include <iostream>
#include <boost/thread.hpp>

void workerFunc()
{
    boost::posix_time::seconds workTime(3);
    std::cout << "Worker: Running" << '\n';
    boost::this_thread::sleep(workTime);
    std::cout << "Worker: Finished" << '\n';
}

int main()
{
    std::cout << "main: startup" << '\n';
    std::vector<std::shared_ptr<boost::thread>> z;

    for (int i = 0; i < 2; ++i) {
        z.push_back(std::make_shared<boost::thread>(workerFunc));
    }

    for (auto t : z) {
        t->join();
    }

    std::cout << "main:done" << '\n';
    return 0;
}

Execute it

# g++ e.cpp -lboost_thread && ./a.out
main: startup
Worker: Running
Worker: Running
Worker: Finished
Worker: Finished
main:done

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