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Background... I have to build a new (asp.net mvc) app that uses an existing class library that is complex and can't be rewritten at this stage. The main problem is that this class library has a huge initialisation hit - it takes up to 10 mins to load all its data into memory. This is fine for production environment where it performs fast after IIS has started up. However, for development this is a nightmare because every time you build the solution and start it up in a browser, it takes ages.

Possible Solution? So, the idea was that Castle Windsor or IOC lifestyle can be used to hold this in memory so that only recycling the application pool will force an expensive reload. I remember having a problem before when Windsor was keeping code in memory so even after changing it and recompiling, IIS still had the old code running - in this scenario it was a problem, but in my new scenario this is exactly what I'd like.

Anyone know how this can be done? I have tried with a dummy project using Singleton lifestyle but after changing the mvc project it still reloads the class library.

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    I don't think Windsor will solve this problem. Recompiling (modifying the bin) will cause the AppDomain to reload anyway.
    – vcsjones
    Jun 2 '11 at 14:18
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    "I remember having a problem before when Windsor was keeping code in memory so even after changing it and recompiling, IIS still had the old code running" -> Windsor can't do that, your problem was somewhere else. Jun 2 '11 at 14:53
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    Using your 10-minute-load class library will in the end cost you much much more than a rewrite, even if it doesn't look like it at this stage.
    – Igor Brejc
    Jun 3 '11 at 12:13
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If the data does serialize then you could store in a cache that will keep it's state when you recompile. For example, memcached runs as a separate process. You could change the bin or restart the dev server process and the cache will keep it's state. There's a provider for accessing memcacheD on codeplex.

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Maybe you could serialize the contents of the loaded library and save it binary form on the disk. This could potentially speed up the load. It's a crazy idea, but then again, having a class library that takes 10 minutes to load is crazy, too.

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