5

Sometimes I want to view all rows in a data frame that will be dropped if I drop all rows that have a missing value for any variable. In this case, I'm specifically interested in how to do this with dplyr 1.0's across() function used inside of the filter() verb.

Here is an example data frame:

df <- tribble(
  ~id, ~x, ~y,
  1, 1, 0,
  2, 1, 1,
  3, NA, 1,
  4, 0, 0,
  5, 1, NA
)

Code for keeping rows that DO NOT include any missing values is provided on the tidyverse website. Specifically, I can use:

df %>% 
  filter(
    across(
      .cols = everything(),
      .fns = ~ !is.na(.x)
    )
  )

Which returns:

# A tibble: 3 x 3
     id     x     y
  <dbl> <dbl> <dbl>
1     1     1     0
2     2     1     1
3     4     0     0

However, I can't figure out how to return the opposite -- rows with a missing value in any variable. The result I'm looking for is:

# A tibble: 2 x 3
     id     x     y
  <dbl> <dbl> <dbl>
1     3    NA     1
2     5     1    NA

My first thought was just to remove the !:

df %>% 
  filter(
    across(
      .cols = everything(),
      .fns = ~ is.na(.x)
    )
  )

But, that returns zero rows.

Of course, I can get the answer I want with this code if I know all variables that have a missing value ahead of time:

df %>% 
  filter(is.na(x) | is.na(y))

But, I'm looking for a solution that doesn't require me to know which variables have a missing value ahead of time. Additionally, I'm aware of how to do this with the filter_all() function:

df %>% 
  filter_all(any_vars(is.na(.)))

But, the filter_all() function has been superseded by the use of across() in an existing verb. See https://dplyr.tidyverse.org/articles/colwise.html

Other unsuccessful attempts I've made are:

df %>% 
  filter(
    across(
      .cols = everything(),
      .fns = ~any_vars(is.na(.x))
    )
  )

df %>% 
  filter(
    across(
      .cols = everything(),
      .fns = ~!!any_vars(is.na(.x))
    )
  )

df %>% 
  filter(
    across(
      .cols = everything(),
      .fns = ~!!any_vars(is.na(.))
    )
  )

df %>% 
  filter(
    across(
      .cols = everything(),
      .fns = ~any(is.na(.x))
    )
  )

df %>% 
  filter(
    across(
      .cols = everything(),
      .fns = ~any(is.na(.))
    )
  )
| |
2

HanOostdijk replied on the RStudio Community website with a solution that uses the across() function. He writes:

"In the same article you mention tidyverse website there is 'a trick' with the rowSums function. You can use that as:"

rowAny <- function(x) {
  rowSums(x) > 0
} 

df %>% 
  filter(
    rowAny(
      across(
       .cols = everything(),
       .fns = ~ is.na(.x)
      )
    )
  )

@akrun points out in the comments below that this can be made more compact as:

df %>% 
  filter(rowSums(across(everything(), ~ is.na(.))) > 0)
| |
  • 1
    Adding some commentary here because I didn't feel like it was appropriate to mix it in with the solution. I'll say again, the solution above works. So, thank you @HanOostdijk! However, it feels unsatisfying to me. For me, dplyr has always been about simplifying code and making it easier to read. The code above does not feel easy to read to me, and it seems like it's more verbose than it should need to be. Don't get me wrong, I'm a huge fan of dplyr and the tidyverse, but as of this moment, across() doesn't feel like an improvement over _if, _at, and _all. I hope it grows on me! – Brad Cannell Jun 3 at 0:30
  • I first thought of posting the rowSums trick but then I thought I should just stick to dplyr because of what you just said, code readability. I agree, at this time across does not seem like a significant improvement over previous options. And yes, this code is not pleasant to read. – cropgen Jun 3 at 3:54
  • 1
    You could make this more compact df %>% filter(rowSums(across(everything(), ~ is.na(.))) > 0). I believe the any_vars, all_vars with filter would change in the future – akrun Jun 3 at 18:54
1

We can use reduce

library(dplyr)
library(purrr)
df %>% 
      filter(across(everything(), is.na) %>% reduce(`|`))
# A tibble: 2 x 3
#     id     x     y
#  <dbl> <dbl> <dbl>
#1     3    NA     1
#2     5     1    NA
| |
  • Thank you, @akrun! I really appreciate you response and your answer definitely works. However, doesn't it feel somewhat unsatisfying? Shouldn't this be more straightforward? – Brad Cannell Jun 2 at 23:24
  • @BradCannell. You are right. I also felt sometime back that the replacement for filter_at with any_vars/all_vars is not clear when we use across. I hope the next release of dplyr would fix these – akrun Jun 3 at 18:56
  • I think I figured out why across() feels a little uncomfortable for me. I think it's because in my mind across() should only select the columns to be operated on (in the spirit of each function does one thing). In reality, across() is used to select the columns to be operated on and to receive the operation to execute. For me, I think across() would feel more natural if it could be used like, for example: df %>% group_by(g1, g2) %>% summarise(across(a:d), mean) instead of: df %>% group_by(g1, g2) %>% summarise(across(a:d, mean)). I'm sure there was a good reason though. – Brad Cannell Jun 4 at 14:38
  • @BradCannell Thanks, I also think in that way. It would be better to suggest in their github page regarding the modification of behaviors so that they would take notice of it and change if they find it more natural – akrun Jun 4 at 18:31
1

Here is my take on this. My understanding of the new across() function is that it operates on columns, not rows. So when you run this code you don't get anything becuase

df %>% 
  filter(
    across(
      .cols = everything(),
      .fns = ~ is.na(.x)
    )
  )

# A tibble: 0 x 3
# … with 3 variables: id <dbl>, x <dbl>, y <dbl>

it essentially create three logical columns in the background to check the presence of element-wise NA, it then probably compute a final logical column on which it operates the filter command. Now this final column will have TRUE only if all the columns are TRUE for is.na(). To test my hypothesis, I added another row in your data that has all NA in all three columns. And when I run your code as is, I get that row as an output because now the corresponding row will generate a TRUE in that final logical vector. Now I don't know if this is how across() works exactly but this makes sense to me.

library(tidyverse)
df <- tribble(
  ~id, ~x, ~y,
  1, 1, 0,
  2, 1, 1,
  3, NA, 1,
  4, 0, 0,
  5, 1, NA,
  NA,NA,NA
)

df %>% 
  filter(
    across(
      .cols = everything(),
      .fns = ~ is.na(.x)
    )
  )
#> # A tibble: 1 x 3
#>      id     x     y
#>   <dbl> <dbl> <dbl>
#> 1    NA    NA    NA

so in order for this to work with your original data, I would use rowwise() and c_across() (rowwise version of across()) as follows

df %>% rowwise() %>% 
  filter(
    is.na(sum(c_across(everything())))
  ) %>% 
  ungroup()
#> # A tibble: 3 x 3
#>      id     x     y
#>   <dbl> <dbl> <dbl>
#> 1     3    NA     1
#> 2     5     1    NA

df %>% rowwise() %>% 
  filter(
    any(is.na(c_across(everything())))
  ) %>% 
  ungroup()
#> # A tibble: 3 x 3
#>      id     x     y
#>   <dbl> <dbl> <dbl>
#> 1     3    NA     1
#> 2     5     1    NA

Created on 2020-06-02 by the reprex package (v0.3.0)

| |
  • Thank you, @cropgen. I appreciate that you were able to submit a dplyr-only solution. But doesn't just feel like there should be a solution that works directly in across()? – Brad Cannell Jun 2 at 23:28
  • Yes, I really hoped that across() should work but sadly it doesn't or I don't know how to use it. – cropgen Jun 3 at 3:55

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