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I was wondering if there is a way to create global arrays in Swi-Prolog . From my understanding , GNU Prolog provides this possibility with g_array . I am trying to create a program that uses very large arrays (using functors), so passing them as parameters to the predicates has to be significantly ineffective .

Thank you in advance .

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    Passing a parameter does not copy it. If you have a variable X bound to a term huge(1, 2, ..., 1000000) and pass it into a call: p(X) and the predicate's head matches it using a variable: p(Y) :- ... then the only thing that happens is that Y (basically a pointer) is set to point to the same term in memory. This is independent of the size of the term that you point to. If you are sure that this parameter passing is a real bottleneck in your code, please add some more details to the question. – Isabelle Newbie Jun 3 at 6:49
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    For example i have a predicate that uses 4 huge arrays and during self recursion (i am implementing dfs algorithm) i have to self loop for 100000 times in one case . My best guess was that passing those arrays as parameters causes the problem . – Stelios Dr Jun 4 at 1:20
  • @IsabelleNewbie: Passing a parameter does not copy it. Are you sure ? That would be true in some systems, like my own old naive interpreter. But when some years ago I prompted Jan on the swi mailing lists about a problem in arg/3 (I was evaluating hashtables), he explained that the term does get copied, at least at builtin interface. Not sure why. Better to dig deeper... – CapelliC Jun 4 at 3:09
  • Same question as stackoverflow.com/questions/62187928/… basically. – David Tonhofer Jun 4 at 16:42
  • @CapelliC see my answer for why there should not be copying for normal calls, and evidence that there indeed isn't. I'm guessing that mail from Jan must have referred to some special case, it would be interesting if you could dig it up. – Isabelle Newbie Jun 4 at 21:37
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There was discussion in the comments whether SWI-Prolog copies terms when passing them as arguments. The answer is that it cannot, since sharing of terms is a central feature of Prolog semantics. If predicates received copies of the caller's terms rather than sharing structure, unification wouldn't be able to propagate information from inside a predicate to its caller.

Consider:

a(X) :-
    b(f(X)).

b(f(X)) :-
    X = hello.

?- a(X).
X = hello.

versus:

c(X) :-
    copy_term(f(X), Copy),
    b(Copy).

?- c(X).
true.

But might there be some other costs to passing structures with large arities to callees? Let's write a benchmark:

time_argument_passing(Arity, Calls) :-
    functor(Term, f, Arity),
    time(calls(Term, Calls)).

calls(Term, Calls) :-
    (   Calls = 0
    ->  true
    ;   Calls1 is Calls - 1,
        calls2(Calls1, Term) ).

calls2(Calls, Term) :-
    (   Calls = 0
    ->  true
    ;   Calls1 is Calls - 1,
        calls(Term, Calls1) ).

This program allocates a term of the given Arity, then passes it through a total of Calls calls. Just to make things a little bit more complex for the interpreter, the calls are not directly self-recursive (but they are still tail calls).

Let's calibrate the costs on smallish terms of arity 10:

?- time_argument_passing(10, 1_000_000).
% 1,000,002 inferences, 0.039 CPU in 0.039 seconds (100% CPU, 25411210 Lips)
true.

?- time_argument_passing(10, 10_000_000).
% 10,000,001 inferences, 0.387 CPU in 0.387 seconds (100% CPU, 25860986 Lips)
true.

?- time_argument_passing(10, 100_000_000).
% 100,000,001 inferences, 3.733 CPU in 3.733 seconds (100% CPU, 26787034 Lips)
true.

?- time_argument_passing(10, 100_000_000).
% 100,000,001 inferences, 3.715 CPU in 3.715 seconds (100% CPU, 26918258 Lips)
true.

?- time_argument_passing(10, 100_000_000).
% 100,000,001 inferences, 3.719 CPU in 3.719 seconds (100% CPU, 26891604 Lips)
true.

Things seem to scale linearly with the number of calls. And now that we know the cost of 100 million calls with a term of arity 10, let's keep the number of calls constant and scale the arity:

?- time_argument_passing(1_000, 100_000_000).
% 100,000,001 inferences, 3.707 CPU in 3.707 seconds (100% CPU, 26974715 Lips)
true.

?- time_argument_passing(1_000, 100_000_000).
% 100,000,001 inferences, 3.751 CPU in 3.751 seconds (100% CPU, 26659983 Lips)
true.

?- time_argument_passing(1_000, 100_000_000).
% 100,000,001 inferences, 3.742 CPU in 3.741 seconds (100% CPU, 26726953 Lips)
true.

?- time_argument_passing(1_000_000, 100_000_000).
% 100,000,001 inferences, 3.928 CPU in 3.928 seconds (100% CPU, 25456692 Lips)
true.

?- time_argument_passing(1_000_000, 100_000_000).
% 100,000,001 inferences, 4.023 CPU in 4.023 seconds (100% CPU, 24854727 Lips)
true.

?- time_argument_passing(1_000_000, 100_000_000).
% 100,000,001 inferences, 3.962 CPU in 3.962 seconds (100% CPU, 25240284 Lips)
true.

?- time_argument_passing(10_000_000, 100_000_000).
% 100,000,001 inferences, 3.724 CPU in 3.724 seconds (100% CPU, 26853583 Lips)
true.

?- time_argument_passing(10_000_000, 100_000_000).
% 100,000,001 inferences, 3.865 CPU in 3.864 seconds (100% CPU, 25875446 Lips)
true.

?- time_argument_passing(10_000_000, 100_000_000).
% 100,000,001 inferences, 3.849 CPU in 3.848 seconds (100% CPU, 25982559 Lips)
true.

Passing a ten million element array is pretty much exactly as fast as passing a ten element array.

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