Without creating a branch and doing a bunch of funky work on a new branch, is it possible to break a single commit into a few different commits after it's been committed to the local repository?

  • 25
    A good source for learning how to do this is Pro Git §6.4 Git Tools - Rewriting History, in the "Splitting a Commit" section. – user456814 Jul 8 '13 at 0:18
  • The docs linked at the above comment are excellent, better explained than the answers below. – Blaisorblade Sep 14 '16 at 15:18
  • 2
    I suggest use of this alias stackoverflow.com/a/19267103/301717. It allows to split a commit using git autorebase split COMMIT_ID – Jezz Oct 8 '16 at 10:22
  • Easiest thing to do without an interactive rebase is (probably) to make a new branch starting at the commit before the one you want to split, cherry-pick -n the commit, reset, stash, commit the file move, reapply the stash and commit the changes, and then either merge with the former branch or cherry-pick the commits that followed. (Then switch the former branch name to the current head.) (It's probably better to follow MBOs advice and do an interactive rebase.) (Copied from 2010 answer below) – William Pursell Jun 8 at 15:52

11 Answers 11

up vote 1289 down vote accepted

git rebase -i will do it.

First, start with a clean working directory: git status should show no pending modifications, deletions, or additions.

To split apart your most recent commit, first:

$ git reset HEAD~

Now commit the pieces individually in the usual way, producing as many commits as you need.

If it was farther back in the tree, then

$ git rebase -i HEAD~3

where 3 is how many commits back it is.

If it was farther back in the tree than you want to count, then

$ git rebase -i 123abcd~

where 123abcd is the SHA1 of the commit you want to split up.

When you get the rebase edit screen, find the commit you want to break apart. At the beginning of that line, replace pick with edit (e for short). Save the buffer and exit. Rebase will now stop just after the commit you want to edit. Then:

$ git reset HEAD~

Commit the pieces individually in the usual way, producing as many commits as you need, then

$ git rebase --continue
  • 2
    Thank you for this answer. I wanted to have some previously committed files in the staging area, so the instructions for me were a little different. Before I could git rebase --continue, I actually had to git add (files to be added), git commit, then git stash (for the remaining files). After git rebase --continue, I used git checkout stash . to get the remaining files – Eric Hu Aug 22 '12 at 19:54
  • 15
    manojlds's answer actually has this link to the documentation on git-scm, which also explains the process of splitting commits very clearly. – user456814 Jul 8 '13 at 0:29
  • 31
    You will also want to take advantage of git add -p to add only partial sections of files, possibly with the e option to edit diffs to only commit some of a hunk. git stash is also useful if you want to carry some work forward but remove it from the current commit. – Craig Ringer Nov 20 '14 at 6:25
  • 1
    If you want to split and reorder commits, what I like to do is split first and then reorder separately using another git rebase -i HEAD^3 command. This way if the split goes bad you don't have to undo quite as much work. – David M. Lloyd Jun 10 '16 at 13:56
  • 2
    @kralyk The files that were newly committed in HEAD will be left on disk after git reset HEAD~. They are not lost. – Wayne Conrad Mar 6 at 15:05

From git-rebase manual (SPLITTING COMMITS section)

In interactive mode, you can mark commits with the action "edit". However, this does not necessarily mean that git rebase expects the result of this edit to be exactly one commit. Indeed, you can undo the commit, or you can add other commits. This can be used to split a commit into two:

  • Start an interactive rebase with git rebase -i <commit>^, where <commit> is the commit you want to split. In fact, any commit range will do, as long as it contains that commit.

  • Mark the commit you want to split with the action "edit".

  • When it comes to editing that commit, execute git reset HEAD^. The effect is that the HEAD is rewound by one, and the index follows suit. However, the working tree stays the same.

  • Now add the changes to the index that you want to have in the first commit. You can use git add (possibly interactively) or git gui (or both) to do that.

  • Commit the now-current index with whatever commit message is appropriate now.

  • Repeat the last two steps until your working tree is clean.

  • Continue the rebase with git rebase --continue.

  • 10
    On Windows you have you use ~ instead of ^. – Kevin Kuszyk Jul 18 '16 at 10:45
  • 5
    Word of caution: with this approach I lost the commit message. – user420667 Dec 20 '16 at 19:08
  • 8
    @user420667 Yes, of course. We are resetting the commit, after all - message included. The prudent thing to do, if you know you're going to be splitting a commit but want to keep some/all of its message, is to take a copy of that message. So, git show the commit before rebaseing, or if you forget or prefer this: get back to it later via the reflog. None of it will actually be "lost" until it's garbage-collected away in 2 weeks or whatever. – underscore_d Dec 26 '16 at 10:54

Use git rebase --interactive to edit that earlier commit, run git reset HEAD~, and then git add -p to add some, then make a commit, then add some more and make another commit, as many times as you like. When you're done, run git rebase --continue, and you'll have all the split commits earlier in your stack.

Important: Note that you can play around and make all the changes you want, and not have to worry about losing old changes, because you can always run git reflog to find the point in your project that contains the changes you want, (let's call it a8c4ab), and then git reset a8c4ab.

Here's a series of commands to show how it works:

mkdir git-test; cd git-test; git init

now add a file A

vi A

add this line:

one

git commit -am one

then add this line to A:

two

git commit -am two

then add this line to A:

three

git commit -am three

now the file A looks like this:

one
two
three

and our git log looks like the following (well, I use git log --pretty=oneline --pretty="%h %cn %cr ---- %s"

bfb8e46 Rose Perrone 4 seconds ago ---- three
2b613bc Rose Perrone 14 seconds ago ---- two
9aac58f Rose Perrone 24 seconds ago ---- one

Let's say we want to split the second commit, two.

git rebase --interactive HEAD~2

This brings up a message that looks like this:

pick 2b613bc two
pick bfb8e46 three

Change the first pick to an e to edit that commit.

git reset HEAD~

git diff shows us that we just unstaged the commit we made for the second commit:

diff --git a/A b/A
index 5626abf..814f4a4 100644
--- a/A
+++ b/A
@@ -1 +1,2 @@
 one
+two

Let's stage that change, and add "and a third" to that line in file A.

git add .

This is usually the point during an interactive rebase where we would run git rebase --continue, because we usually just want to go back in our stack of commits to edit an earlier commit. But this time, we want to create a new commit. So we'll run git commit -am 'two and a third'. Now we edit file A and add the line two and two thirds.

git add . git commit -am 'two and two thirds' git rebase --continue

We have a conflict with our commit, three, so let's resolve it:

We'll change

one
<<<<<<< HEAD
two and a third
two and two thirds
=======
two
three
>>>>>>> bfb8e46... three

to

one
two and a third
two and two thirds
three

git add .; git rebase --continue

Now our git log -p looks like this:

commit e59ca35bae8360439823d66d459238779e5b4892
Author: Rose Perrone <roseperrone@fake.com>
Date:   Sun Jul 7 13:57:00 2013 -0700

    three

diff --git a/A b/A
index 5aef867..dd8fb63 100644
--- a/A
+++ b/A
@@ -1,3 +1,4 @@
 one
 two and a third
 two and two thirds
+three

commit 4a283ba9bf83ef664541b467acdd0bb4d770ab8e
Author: Rose Perrone <roseperrone@fake.com>
Date:   Sun Jul 7 14:07:07 2013 -0700

    two and two thirds

diff --git a/A b/A
index 575010a..5aef867 100644
--- a/A
+++ b/A
@@ -1,2 +1,3 @@
 one
 two and a third
+two and two thirds

commit 704d323ca1bc7c45ed8b1714d924adcdc83dfa44
Author: Rose Perrone <roseperrone@fake.com>
Date:   Sun Jul 7 14:06:40 2013 -0700

    two and a third

diff --git a/A b/A
index 5626abf..575010a 100644
--- a/A
+++ b/A
@@ -1 +1,2 @@
 one
+two and a third

commit 9aac58f3893488ec643fecab3c85f5a2f481586f
Author: Rose Perrone <roseperrone@fake.com>
Date:   Sun Jul 7 13:56:40 2013 -0700

    one

diff --git a/A b/A
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..5626abf
--- /dev/null
+++ b/A
@@ -0,0 +1 @@
+one

Previous answers have covered the use of git rebase -i to edit the commit that you want to split, and committing it in parts.

This works well when splitting the files into different commits, but if you want to break apart changes to the individual files, there's more you need to know.

Having got to the commit you want to split, using rebase -i and marking it for edit, you have two options.

  1. After using git reset HEAD~, go through the patches individually using git add -p to select the ones you want in each commit

  2. Edit the working copy to remove the changes you do not want; commit that interim state; and then pull back the full commit for the next round.

Option 2 is useful if you're splitting a large commit, as it lets you check that the interim versions build and run properly as part of the merge. This proceeds as follows.

After using rebase -i and editing the commit, use

git reset --soft HEAD~

to undo the commit, but leave the committed files in the index. You can also do a mixed reset by omitting --soft, depending on how close to the final result your initial commit is going to be. The only difference is whether you start with all the changes staged or with them all unstaged.

Now go in and edit the code. You can remove changes, delete added files, and do whatever you want to construct the first commit of the series you're looking for. You can also build it, run it, and confirm that you have a consistent set of source.

Once you're happy, stage/unstage the files as needed (I like to use git gui for this), and commit the changes through the UI or the command line

git commit

That's the first commit done. Now you want to restore your working copy to the state it had after the commit you are splitting, so that you can take more of the changes for your next commit. To find the sha1 of the commit you're editing, use git status. In the first few lines of the status you'll see the rebase command that is currently executing, in which you can find the sha1 of your original commit:

$ git status
interactive rebase in progress; onto be83b41
Last commands done (3 commands done):
   pick 4847406 US135756: add debugging to the file download code
   e 65dfb6a US135756: write data and download from remote
  (see more in file .git/rebase-merge/done)
...

In this case, the commit I'm editing has sha1 65dfb6a. Knowing that, I can check out the content of that commit over my working directory using the form of git checkout which takes both a commit and a file location. Here I use . as the file location to replace the whole working copy:

git checkout 65dfb6a .

Don't miss the dot on the end!

This will check out, and stage, the files as they were after the commit you're editing, but relative to the previous commit you made, so any changes you already committed won't be part of the commit.

You can either go ahead now and commit it as-is to finish the split, or go around again, deleting some parts of the commit before making another interim commit.

If you want to reuse the original commit message for one or more commits, you can use it straight from the rebase's working files:

git commit --file .git/rebase-merge/message

Finally, once you've committed all the changes,

git rebase --continue

will carry on and complete the rebase operation.

  • 1
    Thank you!!! This should be the accepted answer. Would have saved me a lot of time and pain today. It's the only answer where the result of the final commit brings you to the same state as the commit under edit. – Doug Coburn Jun 24 '17 at 20:45
  • I like the way you use the original commit message. – Salamandar Jun 18 at 12:18

git rebase --interactive can be used to split a commit into smaller commits. The Git docs on rebase have a concise walkthrough of the process - Splitting Commits:

In interactive mode, you can mark commits with the action "edit". However, this does not necessarily mean that git rebase expects the result of this edit to be exactly one commit. Indeed, you can undo the commit, or you can add other commits. This can be used to split a commit into two:

  • Start an interactive rebase with git rebase -i <commit>^, where <commit> is the commit you want to split. In fact, any commit range will do, as long as it contains that commit.

  • Mark the commit you want to split with the action "edit".

  • When it comes to editing that commit, execute git reset HEAD^. The effect is that the HEAD is rewound by one, and the index follows suit. However, the working tree stays the same.

  • Now add the changes to the index that you want to have in the first commit. You can use git add (possibly interactively) or git gui (or both) to do that.

  • Commit the now-current index with whatever commit message is appropriate now.

  • Repeat the last two steps until your working tree is clean.

  • Continue the rebase with git rebase --continue.

If you are not absolutely sure that the intermediate revisions are consistent (they compile, pass the testsuite, etc.) you should use git stash to stash away the not-yet-committed changes after each commit, test, and amend the commit if fixes are necessary.

  • Under Windows, remember ^ is an escape character for command line: it should be doubled. By example, issue git reset HEAD^^ instead of git reset HEAD^. – Frédéric Mar 26 '17 at 12:43
  • @Frédéric :s I've never run into this. At least in PowerShell this is not the case. Then using ^ twice resets two commits above the current HEAD. – Farway Jan 4 at 10:08
  • @Farway, try it in a classic command line. PowerShell is quite another beast, its escape character is the backtilt. – Frédéric Jan 4 at 13:25

You can do interactive rebase git rebase -i. Man page has exactly what you want:

http://git-scm.com/docs/git-rebase#_splitting_commits

  • 13
    Giving a bit more context on how to approach the issues vs. just giving an RTFM would be a bit more helpful. – Jordan Dea-Mattson May 11 '12 at 17:38

Please note there's also git reset --soft HEAD^. It's similar to git reset (which defaults to --mixed) but it retains the index contents. So that if you've added/removed files, you have them in the index already.

Turns out to be very useful in case of giant commits.

Now in the latest TortoiseGit on Windows you can do it very easily.

Open the rebase dialog, configure it, and do the following steps.

  • Right-click the commit you want to split and select "Edit" (among pick, squash, delete...).
  • Click "Start" to start rebasing.
  • Once it arrives to the commit to split, check the "Edit/Split" button and click on "Amend" directly. The commit dialog opens.
    Edit/Split commit
  • Unselect the files you want to put on a separate commit.
  • Edit the commit message, and then click "commit".
  • Until there are files to commit, the commit dialog will open again and again. When there is no more file to commit, it will still ask you if you want to add one more commit.

Very helpful, thanks TortoiseGit !

I think that the best way i use git rebase -i. I created a video to show the steps to split a commit: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3EzOz7e1ADI

Easiest thing to do without an interactive rebase is (probably) to make a new branch starting at the commit before the one you want to split, cherry-pick -n the commit, reset, stash, commit the file move, reapply the stash and commit the changes, and then either merge with the former branch or cherry-pick the commits that followed. (Then switch the former branch name to the current head.) (It's probably better to follow MBOs advice and do an interactive rebase.)

  • according to SO standarts these days this should be qualified as not-an-answer; but this can still be helpful for others, so if you don't mind please move this to comments of the original post – YakovL Jun 8 at 11:36
  • @YakovL Seems reasonable. On the principal of minimal action, I'll not delete the answer, but I would not object if someone else does. – William Pursell Jun 8 at 15:51

If you have this:

A - B <- mybranch

Where you have committed some content in commit B:

/modules/a/file1
/modules/a/file2
/modules/b/file3
/modules/b/file4

But you want to split B into C - D, and get this result:

A - C - D <-mybranch

You can divide the content like this for example (content from different directories in different commits)...

Reset the branch back to the commit before the one to split:

git checkout mybranch
git reset --hard A

Create first commit (C):

git checkout B /modules/a
git add -u
git commit -m "content of /modules/a"

Create second commit (D):

git checkout B /modules/b
git add -u
git commit -m "content of /modules/b"
  • What if there are commits above B? – CoolMind Dec 21 '17 at 10:13

protected by Florian Jun 8 at 20:41

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