19

My functions in Calculator class is private and I can't test in this way,

describe('calculate', function() {
  it('add', function() {
    let result = Calculator.Sum(5, 2);
    expect(result).toBe(7);   
  });

  it('substract', function() {
    let result = Calculator.Difference(5, 2);
    expect(result).toBe(3);
  });
});

my class:

export default class calculator {
  private Sum(a: number, b: number): number {
    let c = a + b;
    return c;
  }

  private Difference(a: number, b: number): number {
    let c = a - b;
    return c;
  }
}

how can I modify this test with using spyOn on private methods?

thanks for any help

5
  • Please share how Calculator is used privately.
    – satanTime
    Commented Jun 3, 2020 at 11:34
  • 1
    Please, provide the code you're testing. It's unclear what you're asking about. Commented Jun 3, 2020 at 11:35
  • i add to main post
    – user13111868
    Commented Jun 3, 2020 at 11:51
  • Is the class named calculator or Calculator?
    – GOTO 0
    Commented Jun 3, 2020 at 15:15
  • Calculator///
    – user13111868
    Commented Jun 3, 2020 at 15:21

7 Answers 7

24

The easiest solution, to spy on your 'Sum' method of Calculator class, I came around would be:

jest.spyOn(calculator as any, 'Sum').<do-something>();
1
  • This works because you haven't made it runtime private. If you'd make the fields private with #Sum and #Difference this would not be possible. Just a heads up, in case you think private is actually private in JS, it is not. It's TS compile time private only, if you want your classes to truely be secured use private fields (#).
    – Joacopaz
    Commented Sep 14, 2023 at 18:26
13

In Typescript it doesn't allow you to test the private method. So you need something to escape from this behavior. What you can do is something like this

let result = (Calculator as any).Sum(2,3);
expect(result).toBe(5);

I hope that will solve your problem.

7

you can try jest.spyOn for get implementation of private method

Class

export default class Calculator {
  private Sum(a: number, b: number): number {
    let c = a + b;
    return c;
  }
}

Test

const handleErrorSpy = jest.spyOn(Calculator.prototype, 'Sum');
const getSumImplementation = handleErrorSpy.getMockImplementation();

expect(getSumImplementation(1, 2)).toEqual(3);

1
  • 12
    working fiine with addition: jest.spyOn(Calculator.prototype as any, 'Sum');
    – Eli Porush
    Commented May 25, 2022 at 9:55
1

If it's a private data you can't get access to, then you shouldn't test it because it's an internal implementation that might be changed.

You need to cover public interface of your classes that uses this class inside to ensure that they work correctly, how they work inside is their own business.

Otherwise you need to make it public, or at least to pass it as a dependency so you could use a mocked version of it.

10
  • 1
    No, you're wrong, in this case we can use spyOn<any> to private methods but i don't know how to implmented this here
    – user13111868
    Commented Jun 3, 2020 at 11:27
  • 2
    Why am I wrong? I say if you can't access it, if you can - of course you can use Spy despite that testing private things is against testing methodology.
    – satanTime
    Commented Jun 3, 2020 at 11:33
  • 1
    You didn’t get it. They have to be covered, but via public interface. So if you change private methods but don’t change business logic - tests wouldn’t fail.
    – satanTime
    Commented Apr 29, 2022 at 13:55
  • 1
    Right. If I call public save, I don’t care whether it calls private saveToDb or db service directly. Because both of them do the same thing with different path - they save data - the business goal of calling save. So why should my test fail if someone renames saveToDb to updateInDb, and it still does the same thing?
    – satanTime
    Commented Apr 29, 2022 at 14:51
  • 1
    Yep. Everybody should use what they find best. Just a question, how do you find zombie code when you cover private methods?
    – satanTime
    Commented May 2, 2022 at 9:53
1

The visibility of TypeScript private methods is checked at compilation time. They can be accessed in tests when type checks are disabled. This includes spying on private methods with spyOn but they don't benefit from being spies when called directly.

Calculator is a class, it should be instantiated in order to access its methods:

let calculator = new Calculator();
let result = calculator['Sum'](5, 2);
expect(result).toBe(7);   
0
1

Or define interface including method you want to spyOn(), something like:

interface IClassPublic {
  Sum(a: number, b: number): number;
}

then cast object parameter to this type:

jest.spyOn(obj as unknown as IClassPublic, "Sum")
2
  • 2
    methods from interface must be public - it is purpose of interface. Question was how to test private method. Commented Dec 12, 2022 at 16:19
  • One should not mock private methods, even if this is possible in TypeScript in certain conditions. Private methods are use to build the public methods. Testing public methods, make it is easy to change the implementation done via private methods. You can even rename them, change signature, remove them without breaking the public contract.
    – Adrian
    Commented May 16, 2023 at 14:55
0

For typescript code you can try

  1. Use technic mentioned in previous message with casting to any,
  2. Access to private methods via class prototype can be done like this: Calculator.prototype['sum']. By using this trick type is not checked. After you can mock/spy or even substitute private method with your own mock implementation and see if it called properly.

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