6

I have a block of code where I want to apply the using statement to each command in the commands enumerable. What is the C# syntax for this?

await using var transaction = await conn.BeginTransactionAsync(cancel);
IEnumerable<DbCommand> commands = BuildSnowflakeCommands(conn, tenantId);

var commandTasks = new List<Task>();
foreach (var command in commands)
{
    command.CommandTimeout = commandTimeout;
    command.Transaction = transaction;
    commandTasks.Add(command.ExecuteNonQueryAsync(cancel));
}

try
{
    await Task.WhenAll(commandTasks);
}
catch (SnowflakeDbException)
{
    await transaction.RollbackAsync(cancel);
    return;
}

await transaction.CommitAsync(cancel);

Edit: Rider / ReSharper seems to think these two are equivalent, or at least I get a prompt to convert the for into a foreach (this is clearly wrong):

for (var i = 0; i < commands.Count; i++)
{
    await using var command = commands[i];
    command.CommandTimeout = commandTimeout;
    command.Transaction = transaction;
    commandTasks.Add(command.ExecuteNonQueryAsync(cancel));
}

and

foreach (var command in commands)
{
    command.CommandTimeout = commandTimeout;
    command.Transaction = transaction;
    commandTasks.Add(command.ExecuteNonQueryAsync(cancel));
}

Edit 2: After some discussion and a few helpful answers, this is what I'm going with:

var transaction = await conn.BeginTransactionAsync(cancel);
var commands = BuildSnowflakeCommands(conn, tenantId);

var commandTasks = commands.Select(async command =>
{
    await using (command)
    {
        command.CommandTimeout = commandTimeout;
        command.Transaction = transaction;
        await command.ExecuteNonQueryAsync(cancel);
    }
});

try
{
    await Task.WhenAll(commandTasks);
    await transaction.CommitAsync(cancel);
}
catch (SnowflakeDbException)
{
    await transaction.RollbackAsync(cancel);
}
finally
{
    await transaction.DisposeAsync();
}
4
0

You can use LINQ:

var commandTasks = commands.Select(async command =>
{
    using (command)
    {
        command.CommandTimeout = commandTimeout;
        command.Transaction = transaction;
        await command.ExecuteNonQueryAsync(cancel);
    }
});

The command will then be disposed as soon as it exits scope.

Full code:

await using var transaction = await conn.BeginTransactionAsync(cancel);
IEnumerable<DbCommand> commands = BuildSnowflakeCommands(conn, tenantId);

var commandTasks = commands.Select(async command =>
{
    using (command)
    {
        command.CommandTimeout = commandTimeout;
        command.Transaction = transaction;
        await command.ExecuteNonQueryAsync(cancel);
    }
});

try
{
    await Task.WhenAll(commandTasks);
}
catch (SnowflakeDbException)
{
    await transaction.RollbackAsync(cancel);
    return;
}

await transaction.CommitAsync(cancel);

Definitely don't use the for loop example; the await will cause each command to happen in serial, as the completion of each query must be awaited before the next is initiated.

| improve this answer | |
  • Doesn't this change the overall flow, though? As you're now awaiting inside the select? – xandermonkey Jun 3 at 15:05
  • 2
    @xandermonkey No, the async lambda will return a Task as soon as await is hit, allowing each command to happen in parallel. Each command will only be disposed once ExecuteNonQueryAsync is complete. – Johnathan Barclay Jun 3 at 15:07
  • Ok. Another problem with this, though. The captured variable transaction is now disposed in the outer scope – xandermonkey Jun 3 at 15:10
  • @xandermonkey Are you still using Task.WhenAll? Disposing a DbCommand shouldn't dispose the DbTransaction. – Johnathan Barclay Jun 3 at 15:14
  • 1
    @xandermonkey Have you tried to run the code? Whilst the transaction is disposed in the outer scope, it won't leave scope until all the commands have completed. – Johnathan Barclay Jun 3 at 15:46
1
0

You can't call Dispose or DisposeAsync a set of IDisposables or IAsyncDisposables using the language syntax alone.

You can iterate each one and call the appropriate method. I would cache all the commands as an array or readonly collection before re-enumerating.

I would avoid disposing in your loop as your JetBrains tooling recommends. The command has to live longer than just that.

Personally, I would do something like this:

var commands = BuildSnowflakeCommands(conn, tenantId).ToArray();
var commandTasks = new List<Task>(commands.Length);

foreach (var command in commands)
{
    command.CommandTimeout = commandTimeout;
    command.Transaction = transaction;
    commandTasks.Add(command.ExecuteNonQueryAsync(cancel));
}

/// later...
foreach (var command in commands)
{
    command.Dispose();
}
| improve this answer | |
  • Interesting. Please see my edited post, I'm curious to look into this further. – xandermonkey Jun 3 at 14:36
  • command.Dispose(); this is error-prone, the object might have been already disposed. command?.Dispose(); is a bit more robust. – Peter Csala Jun 3 at 14:42
  • 4
    @PeterCsala the null propagation operator doesn't have to do with disposable at all. – Daniel A. White Jun 3 at 14:43
  • Based on the implementation the command could point to null after an exception or after the dispose. So rather than exposing your program to throw NullReferenceException you can call the Dispose only if the command is not null. – Peter Csala Jun 3 at 14:47
  • @PeterCsala how - theres no null assignment to anything.... this is merely an example and the further tuning is up to the OP to figure out what to actually do. – Daniel A. White Jun 3 at 14:47

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