162

Consider this code:

int i = 1;
int x = ++i + ++i;

We have some guesses for what a compiler might do for this code, assuming it compiles.

  1. both ++i return 2, resulting in x=4.
  2. one ++i returns 2 and the other returns 3, resulting in x=5.
  3. both ++i return 3, resulting in x=6.

To me, the second seems most likely. One of the two ++ operators is executed with i = 1, the i is incremented, and the result 2 is returned. Then the second ++ operator is executed with i = 2, the i is incremented, and the result 3 is returned. Then 2 and 3 are added together to give 5.

However, I ran this code in Visual Studio, and the result was 6. I'm trying to understand compilers better, and I'm wondering what could possibly lead to a result of 6. My only guess is that the code could be executed with some "built-in" concurrency. The two ++ operators were called, each incremented i before the other returned, and then they both returned 3. This would contradict my understanding of the call stack, and would need to be explained away.

What (reasonable) things could a C++ compiler do that would lead to a result of 4 or a result or 6?

Note

This example appeared as an example of undefined behavior in Bjarne Stroustrup's Programming: Principles and Practice using C++ (C++ 14).

See cinnamon's comment.

  • 5
    The C spec doesn't actually cover the ordering of operations or evaluations on the right side of the = compared to the pre/postincrement operations, only on the left. – Cristobol Polychronopolis Jun 5 at 17:51
  • 2
    Recommend that you give citation in the question if you got this example from a book by Stroustrup (as mentioned in comment to one of the answers). – Daniel R. Collins Jun 6 at 15:31
  • 4
    @philipxy Your suggested duplicate is not a duplicate of this question. The questions are different. The answers in your suggested duplicate do not answer this question. The answers in your suggested duplicate are not duplicates of the accepted (or high vote) answer(s) to this question. I believe you have misread my question. I suggest you reread it and reconsider the vote to close. – cinnamon Jun 7 at 18:33
  • 3
    @philipxy "The answers say that a compiler can do anything ..." That doesn't answer my question. "they show that even if you think your question is different it is just a variation on that one" What? "although you don't give your version of C++" My version of C++ is irrelevant to my question. "therefore the entire program the statement is in can do anything at all" I know, but my question was about specific behavior. "Your comment doesn't reflect the content of the answers there." My comment reflects the content of my question, which you should reread. – cinnamon Jun 7 at 20:06
  • 2
    To answer the title; because UB means the bahavioir is undefined. Multiple compilers made at different times throughout history, by different people for different architectures, when asked to colour outside of the lines and make a real world implementation they had to put something in this part outside of the specification, so people did exactly that and each of them used different crayons. Hence the hoary maxim, do not rely on UB – Toby Jun 10 at 20:06

14 Answers 14

196
7

The compiler takes your code, splits it into very simple instructions, and then recombines and arranges them in a way that it thinks optimal.

The code

int i = 1;
int x = ++i + ++i;

consists of the following instructions:

1. store 1 in i
2. read i as tmp1
3. add 1 to tmp1
4. store tmp1 in i
5. read i as tmp2
6. read i as tmp3
7. add 1 to tmp3
8. store tmp3 in i
9. read i as tmp4
10. add tmp2 and tmp4, as tmp5
11. store tmp5 in x

But despite this being a numbered list the way I wrote it, there are only a few ordering dependencies here: 1->2->3->4->5->10->11 and 1->6->7->8->9->10->11 must stay in their relative order. Other than that the compiler can freely reorder, and perhaps eliminate redundancy.

For example, you could order the list like this:

1. store 1 in i
2. read i as tmp1
6. read i as tmp3
3. add 1 to tmp1
7. add 1 to tmp3
4. store tmp1 in i
8. store tmp3 in i
5. read i as tmp2
9. read i as tmp4
10. add tmp2 and tmp4, as tmp5
11. store tmp5 in x

Why can the compiler do this? Because there's no sequencing to the side effects of the increment. But now the compiler can simplify: for example, there's a dead store in 4: the value is immediately overwritten. Also, tmp2 and tmp4 are really the same thing.

1. store 1 in i
2. read i as tmp1
6. read i as tmp3
3. add 1 to tmp1
7. add 1 to tmp3
8. store tmp3 in i
5. read i as tmp2
10. add tmp2 and tmp2, as tmp5
11. store tmp5 in x

And now everything to do with tmp1 is dead code: it's never used. And the re-read of i can be eliminated too:

1. store 1 in i
6. read i as tmp3
7. add 1 to tmp3
8. store tmp3 in i
10. add tmp3 and tmp3, as tmp5
11. store tmp5 in x

Look, this code is much shorter. The optimizer is happy. The programmer is not, because i was only incremented once. Oops.

Let's look at something else the compiler can do instead: let's go back to the original version.

1. store 1 in i
2. read i as tmp1
3. add 1 to tmp1
4. store tmp1 in i
5. read i as tmp2
6. read i as tmp3
7. add 1 to tmp3
8. store tmp3 in i
9. read i as tmp4
10. add tmp2 and tmp4, as tmp5
11. store tmp5 in x

The compiler could reorder it like this:

1. store 1 in i
2. read i as tmp1
3. add 1 to tmp1
4. store tmp1 in i
6. read i as tmp3
7. add 1 to tmp3
8. store tmp3 in i
5. read i as tmp2
9. read i as tmp4
10. add tmp2 and tmp4, as tmp5
11. store tmp5 in x

and then notice again that i is read twice, so eliminate one of them:

1. store 1 in i
2. read i as tmp1
3. add 1 to tmp1
4. store tmp1 in i
6. read i as tmp3
7. add 1 to tmp3
8. store tmp3 in i
5. read i as tmp2
10. add tmp2 and tmp2, as tmp5
11. store tmp5 in x

That's nice, but it can go further: it can reuse tmp1:

1. store 1 in i
2. read i as tmp1
3. add 1 to tmp1
4. store tmp1 in i
6. read i as tmp1
7. add 1 to tmp1
8. store tmp1 in i
5. read i as tmp2
10. add tmp2 and tmp2, as tmp5
11. store tmp5 in x

Then it can eliminate the re-read of i in 6:

1. store 1 in i
2. read i as tmp1
3. add 1 to tmp1
4. store tmp1 in i
7. add 1 to tmp1
8. store tmp1 in i
5. read i as tmp2
10. add tmp2 and tmp2, as tmp5
11. store tmp5 in x

Now 4 is a dead store:

1. store 1 in i
2. read i as tmp1
3. add 1 to tmp1
7. add 1 to tmp1
8. store tmp1 in i
5. read i as tmp2
10. add tmp2 and tmp2, as tmp5
11. store tmp5 in x

and now 3 and 7 can be merged into one instruction:

1. store 1 in i
2. read i as tmp1
3+7. add 2 to tmp1
8. store tmp1 in i
5. read i as tmp2
10. add tmp2 and tmp2, as tmp5
11. store tmp5 in x

Eliminate the last temporary:

1. store 1 in i
2. read i as tmp1
3+7. add 2 to tmp1
8. store tmp1 in i
10. add tmp1 and tmp1, as tmp5
11. store tmp5 in x

And now you get the result that Visual C++ is giving you.

Note that in both optimization paths, the important order dependencies were preserved, insofar as the instructions weren't removed for doing nothing.

| improve this answer | |
  • 36
    Currently, this is the only answer which mentions sequencing. – PM 2Ring Jun 4 at 11:32
  • 3
    -1 I don't think that this answer is clarifying. The observed results aren't dependent on any compiler optimizations at all (see my answer). – Daniel R. Collins Jun 4 at 15:42
  • 3
    This assumes read-modify-write operations. Some CPUs, such as the ubiquitous x86, have an atomic increment operation, which adds even more complexity to the situation. – Mark Jun 4 at 20:02
  • 6
    @philipxy "The standard has nothing to say about object code." The standard has nothing to say about the behavior of this snippet either - it's UB. That's a premise of the question. The OP wanted to know why, in practice, compilers could arrive at different and weird results. Also, my answer doesn't even say anything about object code. – Sebastian Redl Jun 8 at 15:43
  • 5
    @philipxy I don’t understand your objection. As noted, the question is about what a compiler might do in the presence of UB, not about the C++ standard. Why would using object code be inappropriate when exploring how a hypothetical compiler is transforming the code? In fact, how would anything but object code be relevant? – Konrad Rudolph Jun 10 at 9:29
58
0

While this is UB (as the OP implied), following are hypothetical ways a compiler could get the 3 results. All three would give the same correct x result if used with different int i = 1, j = 1; variables instead of one and the same i.

  1. both ++i return 2, resulting in x=4.
int i = 1;
int i1 = i, i2 = i;   // i1 = i2 = 1
++i1;                 // i1 = 2
++i2;                 // i2 = 2
int x = i1 + i2;      // x = 4
  1. one ++i returns 2 and the other returns 3, resulting in x=5.
int i = 1;
int i1 = ++i;           // i1 = 2
int i2 = ++i;           // i2 = 3
int x = i1 + i2;        // x = 5
  1. both ++i return 3, resulting in x=6.
int i = 1;
int &i1 = i, &i2 = i;
++i1;                   // i = 2
++i2;                   // i = 3
int x = i1 + i2;        // x = 6
| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    this is a better response than what I hoped for, thank you. – cinnamon Jun 4 at 2:07
  • 1
    For option 1, the compiler might have made a note to preincrement i. Knowing it can only happen once, it only emits it once. For option 2 the code is translated to machine code literally, like a college compiler class project might do. For option 3, it's like option 1, but it made two copies of the preincrement. Must have used a vector, not a set. :-) – Zan Lynx Jun 4 at 2:12
  • @dxiv sorry, my bad, I mixed up posts – muru Jun 5 at 17:25
22
0

To me, the second seems most likely.

I am going for option #4: Both ++i happen concurrently.

Newer processors move toward some interesting optimizations and parallel code evaluation, where allowed as here, is another way compilers keep making faster code. I see as a practical implementation, compilers moving toward parallelism.

I could readily see a race condition causing non-deterministic behavior or a bus fault due to same memory contention - all allowed as the coder violated the C++ contract - hence UB.

My question is: what (reasonable) things could a C++ compiler do that would lead to a result of 4 or a result or 6?

It could, but do not count in it.

Don't use ++i + ++i nor expect sensible results.

| improve this answer | |
  • If I could accept both this answer and @dxiv's I would. Thank you for the response. – cinnamon Jun 4 at 2:16
  • 4
    @UriRaz: The processor might not even notice there's a data hazard depending on the compiler's choice. E.g. the compiler might assign i to two registers, increment both registers, and write them both back. The processor has no way to resolve that. The fundamental problem is that neither C++ nor modern CPU's are strictly sequential. C++ explicitly has the happens-before and happens-after sequencing, to allow a happens-at-the-same-time by default. – MSalters Jun 4 at 11:07
  • 1
    But we know that's not the case for the OP using Visual Studio; most mainstream ISAs including x86 and ARM are defined in terms of a fully sequential model of execution where one machine instruction fully finishes before the next one starts. Superscalar out-of-order must maintain that illusion for a single thread. (Other threads reading shared memory aren't guaranteed to see things in program order, but the cardinal rule of OoO exec is not to break single-threaded execution.) – Peter Cordes Jun 4 at 13:14
  • 1
    This is my favorite answer, cause it is the only one which mentions parallel instruction execution at CPU level. Btw, would be nice to mention in the answer that either due to race conditions cpu thread will be stalled waiting for a mutex unlock on same memory location, so this is very unoptimal in concurrency model. Second - due to same race condition real answer can be 4 or 5,- depending on the cpu thread execution model/speed, so this is UB at heart. – Agnius Vasiliauskas Jun 5 at 8:50
  • 1
    @AgniusVasiliauskas Perhaps, yet "In practice, why would different compilers compute different values" is looking more for an easy to understand given a simplistic view of processors of today. Yet the range of compilers/processors scenarios if far greater than the few various answers mentioned. Your useful insight is yet another. IMO, parallelism is the future and so this answer focused on those, albeit in an abstract way - as the future is still unfolding. IAC, the post has become popular and easy to grasp answers are best rewarded. – chux - Reinstate Monica Jun 5 at 11:31
17
0

I think that a simple and straightforward interpretation (without any bid to compiler optimizations or multithreading) would be just:

  1. Increment i
  2. Increment i
  3. Add i + i

With i incremented twice, its value is 3, and when added together, the sum is 6.

For inspection, consider this as a C++ function:

int dblInc ()
{
    int i = 1;
    int x = ++i + ++i;
    return x;   
}

Now, here's the assembly code I get from compiling that function, using an old version of the GNU C++ compiler (win32, gcc version 3.4.2 (mingw-special)). There's no fancy optimizations or multithreading happening here:

__Z6dblIncv:
    push    ebp
    mov ebp, esp
    sub esp, 8
    mov DWORD PTR [ebp-4], 1
    lea eax, [ebp-4]
    inc DWORD PTR [eax]
    lea eax, [ebp-4]
    inc DWORD PTR [eax]
    mov eax, DWORD PTR [ebp-4]
    add eax, DWORD PTR [ebp-4]
    mov DWORD PTR [ebp-8], eax
    mov eax, DWORD PTR [ebp-8]
    leave
    ret

Note that local variable i is sitting on the stack in just one single place: address [ebp-4]. That location is incremented twice (in the 5th-8th lines of the assembly function; including apparently redundant loads of that address into eax). Then on the 9th-10th lines, that value is loaded into eax, and then added into eax (that is, computes the current i + i). Then it's redundantly copied to the stack and back to eax as the return value (which will obviously be 6).

It may be of interest to look at the C++ standard (here, an old one: ISO/IEC 14882:1998(E)) which says for Expressions, section 5.4:

Except where noted, the order of evaluation of operands of individual operators and subexpressions of individual expressions, and the order in which side effects take place, is unspecified.

With the footnote:

The precedence of operators is not directly specified, but it can be derived from the syntax.

Two examples of unspecified behavior are given at that point, both involving the increment operator (one of which is: i = ++i + 1).

Now, if one wished, one could: Make an integer wrapper class (like a Java Integer); overload functions operator+ and operator++ such that they return the intermediate value objects; and thereby write ++iObj + ++iObj and get it to return an object holding 5. (I haven't included full code here for the sake of brevity.)

Personally, I'd by intrigued if there was an example of a well-known compiler that did the job any other way than the sequence seen above. It seems to me like the most straightforward implementation would be to just do two assembly-code incs on the primitive type before the addition operation is performed.

| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    Increment operator does really have a very well defined "return" value – edc65 Jun 5 at 13:46
  • @philipxy: I've edited the answer to take out the passages that you objected to. You may or may not agree with the answer more at this point. – Daniel R. Collins Jun 5 at 18:49
  • 2
    Those are not "Two examples of unspecified behavior", those are two examples of undefined behavior, a very different beast, arising from a different passage in the standard. I see C++98 used to say "unspecified" in the text of the footnote's example, contradicting the normative text, but that was fixed later on. – Cubbi Jun 5 at 21:21
  • @Cubbi: Both the text and the footnote in the standard quoted here use the phrase "unspecified", "not directly specified", and it seems to match the term from definitions section 1.3.13. – Daniel R. Collins Jun 6 at 22:58
  • 1
    @philipxy: I see that you've repeated the same comment to many of the answers here. It seems like your main critique is really more about the OP's question itself, whose scope is not just about the abstract standard. – Daniel R. Collins Jun 7 at 14:22
7
0

The reasonable thing that a compiler can do is Common Subexpression Elimination. This is already a common optimisation in compilers: if a subexpression like (x+1) occurs more than once in a larger expression, it only needs to be calculated once. E.g. in a/(x+1) + b*(x+1) the x+1 sub-expression can be calculated once.

Of course, the compiler has to know which sub-expressions can be optimised that way. Calling rand() twice should give two random numbers. Non-inlined function calls must therefore be exempt from CSE. As you note, there is no rule that says how two occurrences of i++ should be handled, so there's no reason to exempt them from CSE.

The result may indeed be that int x = ++i + ++i; is optimised to int __cse = i++; int x = __cse << 1. (CSE, followed by repeated strength reduction)

| improve this answer | |
  • The standard has nothing to say about object code. This isn't justified by or related to the language definition. – philipxy Jun 7 at 8:49
  • 1
    @philipxy: The standard has nothing to say about any form of Undefined Behavior. That's the premise of the question. – MSalters Jun 8 at 8:46
7
0

In practice, you are invoking undefined behavior. Anything can happen, not just things that you consider "reasonable", and often things do happen that you don't consider reasonable. Everything is by definition "reasonable".

A very reasonable compilation is that the compiler observes that executing a statement will invoke undefined behavior, therefore the statement cannot be executed, therefore it is translated to an instruction that intentionally crashes your application. That is very reasonable.

Downvoter: GCC strongly disagrees with you.

| improve this answer | |
  • When the Standard characterizes something as "undefined behavior", that means nothing more nor less than that the behavior is outside the Standard's jurisdiction. Because the Standard makes no attempt to judge the reasonableness of things outside its jurisdiction, and makes no attempt to forbid all the ways a conforming implementation might be unreasonably useless, the Standard's failure to impose requirements in a particular situation does not imply any judgment that all possible actions are equally "reasonable". – supercat Jun 7 at 20:48
6
0

There is no reasonable thing a compiler could do to get a result of 6, but it's possible and legitimate. A result of 4 is entirely reasonable, and I'd consider a result of 5 borderline reasonable. All of them are perfectly legal.

Hey, wait! Isn't it clear what must happen? The addition needs the results of the two increments, so obviously these must happen first. And we go left to right, so... argh! If only it was so simple. Unluckily, that's not the case. We do not go left to right, and that's the problem.

Reading the memory location into two registers (or initializing them both from the same literal, optimizing out the round trip to memory) is a very reasonable thing for the compiler to do. This will effectively have the effect of there covertly being two different variables, each with a value of 2, which will finally be added to a result of 4. This is "reasonable" because it's fast and efficient, and it is in accordance with both the standard and with the code.

Similarly, the memory location could be read once (or the variable initialized from the literal) and incremented once, and a shadow copy in another register could be incremented after that, which would result in 2 and 3 being added together. This is, I would say, borderline reasonable, although perfectly legal. I deem it borderline reasonable because it isn't one or the other. It's neither the "reasonable" optimized way, nor is it the "reasonable" exactly-pedantic way. It's somewhat in the middle.

Incrementing the memory location twice (resulting in a value of 3) and then adding that value to itself for a final result of 6 is legitimate, but not quite reasonable as doing memory round trips isn't precisely efficient. Although on a processor with good store forwarding, it might as well be "reasonable" to do it, since the store should be mostly invisible...
As the compiler "knows" that it's the same location, it might as well choose to increment the value twice within a register, and then add it to itself, too. Either approach would give you the result of 6.

The compiler is, by the wording of the standard, allowed to give you any such result, although I would personally consider 6 pretty much a "fuck you" memo from the Obnoxious Department, as it is a rather unexpected thing (legal or not, trying to always give the least amount of surprises is a good thing to do!). Though, seeing how Undefined Behavior is involved, sadly one cannot really argue about "unexpected", eh.

So, actually, what is the code that you have there, to the compiler? Let's ask clang, which will show us if we ask nicely (invoking with -ast-dump -fsyntax-only):

ast.cpp:4:9: warning: multiple unsequenced modifications to 'i' [-Wunsequenced]
int x = ++i + ++i;
        ^     ~~
(some lines omitted)
`-CompoundStmt 0x2b3e628 <line:2:1, line:5:1>
  |-DeclStmt 0x2b3e4b8 <line:3:1, col:10>
  | `-VarDecl 0x2b3e430 <col:1, col:9> col:5 used i 'int' cinit
  |   `-IntegerLiteral 0x2b3e498 <col:9> 'int' 1
  `-DeclStmt 0x2b3e610 <line:4:1, col:18>
    `-VarDecl 0x2b3e4e8 <col:1, col:17> col:5 x 'int' cinit
      `-BinaryOperator 0x2b3e5f0 <col:9, col:17> 'int' '+'
        |-ImplicitCastExpr 0x2b3e5c0 <col:9, col:11> 'int' <LValueToRValue>
        | `-UnaryOperator 0x2b3e570 <col:9, col:11> 'int' lvalue prefix '++'
        |   `-DeclRefExpr 0x2b3e550 <col:11> 'int' lvalue Var 0x2b3e430 'i' 'int'
        `-ImplicitCastExpr 0x2b3e5d8 <col:15, col:17> 'int' <LValueToRValue>
          `-UnaryOperator 0x2b3e5a8 <col:15, col:17> 'int' lvalue prefix '++'
            `-DeclRefExpr 0x2b3e588 <col:17> 'int' lvalue Var 0x2b3e430 'i' 'int'

As you can see, the same lvalue Var 0x2b3e430 has prefix ++ applied at two locations, and these two are below the same node in the tree, which happens to be a very non-special operator (+) that has nothing special being said about sequencing or such. Why is this important? Well, read on.

Note the warning: "multiple unsequenced modifications to 'i'". Oh oh, that doesn't sound good. What does it mean? [basic.exec] tells us about side effects and sequencing, and it tells us (paragraph 10) that by default, unless explicitly said otherwise, evaluations of operands of individual operators and of subexpressions of individual expressions are unsequenced. Well, darn, that's the case with operator+ -- nothing is being said otherwise, so...

But do we care about sequenced-before, indeterminately-sequenced, or unsequenced? Who wants to know, anyway?

That same paragraph also tells us that unsequenced evaluations may overlap and that when they refer to the same memory location (that's the case!) and that one is not potentially concurrent, then the behavior is undefined. This is where it really gets ugly because that means you know nothing, and you have no guarantees about being "reasonable" whatsoever. The unreasonable thing is actually perfectly allowable and "reasonable".

| improve this answer | |
  • The use of "reasonable" was just to preempt anyone from saying "the compiler could do ANYTHING, even emit the single instruction 'set x to 7.'" perhaps I should have clarified. – cinnamon Jun 5 at 18:44
  • @cinnamon Many years ago, when I was young and unexperienced, compiler engineers at Sun told me that that their compiler acted absolutely reasonable producing code for undefined behaviour that I found unreasonable at the time. Lesson learned. – gnasher729 Jun 6 at 19:08
  • The standard has nothing to say about object code. This is fragmented & unclear about how your suggested implementations are justified by or related to the language definition. – philipxy Jun 7 at 8:53
  • @philipxy: The standard defines what is well-formed and well-defined and what is not. In the case of this Q, it defines the behavior as undefined. Beyond being legal, there is also the reasonable assumption of compilers generating efficient code. Yes, you are right, the standard does not require that to be the case. It is nevertheless a reasonable assumption. – Damon Jun 7 at 16:25
1
0

There is a rule:

Between the previous and next sequence point a scalar object must have its stored value modified at most once by the evaluation of an expression, otherwise the behavior is undefined.

Thus even x = 100 is a possible valid result.

For me the most logical result in the example is 6, because we are increasing the value of i twice and them add it to itself. It is difficult to do addition before the calculation values from both sides of "+".

But compiler developers can implement any other logic.

| improve this answer | |
0
0

It looks like ++i returns an lvalue but i++ returns an rvalue.
So this code is ok:

int i = 1;
++i = 10;
cout << i << endl;

This one is not:

int i = 1;
i++ = 10;
cout << i << endl;

The above two statements are consistent with VisualC++, GCC7.1.1, CLang and Embarcadero.
That is why your code in VisualC++ and GCC7.1.1 is similar to following one

int i = 1;
... do something there for instance: ++i; ++i; ...
int x = i + i;

When looking at disassembly, it first increments i, rewrites i. When trying to add it does the same thing, increments i and rewrites it. Then adds i to i.
enter image description here
I've noticed CLang and Embarcadero acts differently. So it is not consistent with the first statement, after first ++i it stores the result in an rvalue and then add it to second i++.

| improve this answer | |
  • The problem with "looks line an lvalue" is that you're talking from the perspective of the C++ standard, not a compiler. – MSalters Jun 4 at 10:58
  • @MSalters The statement is consistent with VisualStudio 2019, GCC7.1.1, clang and Embarcadero, and with the first piece of code. So the specification is consistent. But it work differently for second piece of code. The second piece of code is consistent with VisualStudio 2019 and GCC7.1.1 but not consistent with clang and Embarcadero. – armagedescu Jun 4 at 12:30
  • 3
    Well, the first piece of code in your answer is legal C++, so obviously the implementations are consistent with the specification.Compared to the question, your "do something" ends in a semicolon, making it a full statement. That creates a sequencing which is required by the C++ standard, but not present in the question. – MSalters Jun 4 at 13:11
  • @MSalters I wanted to do it as a equivalent pseudo code. Yet I am not sure how to reformulate it – armagedescu Jun 4 at 13:19
0
0

I personally would never have expected a compiler to output 6 in your example. There are already good and detailed answers to your question. I will try a short version.

Basically, ++i is a 2-step process in this context:

  1. Increment the value of i
  2. Read the value of i

In the context of ++i + ++i the two sides of the addition may be evaluated in any order according to the standard. This means the two increments are considered independent. Also, there is no dependency between the two terms. The increment and read of i may therefore be interleaved. This gives the potential order:

  1. Increment i for the left operand
  2. Increment i for the right operand
  3. Read back i for the left operand
  4. Read back i for the right operand
  5. Sum the two: yields 6

Now, that I think about this, 6 makes the most sense according to the standard. For a result of 4 we need a CPU which first reads i independently, then increments and writes the value back into the same location; basically a race condition. For a value of 5 we need a compiler which introduces temporaries.

But, the standard says that ++i increments the variable before returning it, i.e. before actually executing the current code line. The sum operator + needs to sum i + i after applying the increments. I would say that C++ needs to work on the variables and not on a value semantic. Hence, to me 6 makes now the most sense as it relies on semantics of the language and not the execution model of CPUs.

| improve this answer | |
0
0
#include <stdio.h>


void a1(void)
{
    int i = 1;
    int x = ++i;
    printf("i=%d\n",i);
    printf("x=%d\n",x);
    x = x + ++i;    // Here
    printf("i=%d\n",i);
    printf("x=%d\n",x);
}


void b2(void)
{
    int i = 1;
    int x = ++i;
    printf("i=%d\n",i);
    printf("x=%d\n",x);
    x = i + ++i;    // Here
    printf("i=%d\n",i);
    printf("x=%d\n",x);
}


void main(void)
{
    a1();
    // b2();
}
| improve this answer | |
0
0

well it depends on the design of the compiler.Therefore the answer will depend on the way the compiler decodes the statements.Using two different variables ++x and ++y instead to create a logic would be a better choice. note:the ouput depends on the version of latest version of language in ms visual studio if its updated.So if the rules have changed so will the output

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0
0

Try This

int i = 1;
int i1 = i, i2 = i;   // i1 = i2 = 1
++i1;                 // i1 = 2
++i2;                 // i2 = 2
int x = i1 + i2;      // x = 4
| improve this answer | |
-4
0

In practice, you are invoking undefined behaviour. Anything can happen, not just things that you consider "reasonable", and often things do happen that you don't consider reasonable. Everything is by definition "reasonable".

A very reasonable compilation is that the compiler observes that executing a statement will invoke undefined behaviour, therefore the statement cannot be ever executed, therefore it is translated to an instruction that intentionally crashes your application. That is very reasonable. After all, the compiler knows that this crash can never happen.

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    I believe you have misunderstood the question. The question is about general or specific behavior that could lead to specific outcomes (the outcomes of x = 4, 5, or 6). If you don't like my use of the word "reasonable", I direct you to my comment above, which you have replied to: "The use of 'reasonable' was just to preempt anyone from saying 'the compiler could do ANYTHING, even emit the single instruction '"set x to 7."'" If you have better wording for the question that retains the general idea, I'm open to it. Also, it appears you re-posted your answer. – cinnamon Jun 6 at 19:27
  • 2
    suggest deleting one of your two answers since they are both very similar – M.M Jun 10 at 5:25

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