1

I have a sprite class, which has a templatised data member. It holds an object, which has a pointer to this specialised sprite template class.

That object requires a forward declaration of my sprite class, but since sprite is a template class, I need to include the full header. Therefore I get a cyclic dependancy which I am unable to figure out

Sprite.h

#include "myclass.h"
 template<typename SpriteType, typename = typename std::enable_if_t<std::is_base_of_v<sf::Transformable, SpriteType> && std::is_base_of_v<sf::Drawable, SpriteType>>>
class Sprite {
public:
    SpriteType s;
    myclass<SpriteType>;
    Sprite() {
    }
    auto foo() {
        return s;
    }

private:

};

myclass.h

#include "Sprite.h"

//a sprite of type T, is going to create a myclass<Sprite<T>>, a pointer of the Sprite<T> is held in myclass.

template<typename T>
class myclass
{
public:
    std::shared_ptr<Sprite<T>> ptr;
    myclass() {

    }
private:

};

How could I solve this cyclic dependency?

So in summary:

-Sprite is a template class.

-Sprite holds an object to another class. This other class holds a pointer to my this templated sprite class.

-This gives me a cyclic dependency, since both classes are now templates, and need to have their implementations written in their header files.

  • You could break this easy just by having the type sprit in nyclass also be a template type. There are undoubtedly other ways, just thought I'd throw that out there as a quicky. – Taekahn Jun 4 '20 at 20:24
  • I dont understand. Could you explain please? – expl0it3r Jun 4 '20 at 20:30
1

Simplified decoupling, based on @Taekahns solution.

template<typename T>
class myclass
{
public:
    std::shared_ptr<T> ptr;
    myclass() {

    }
private:

};

template<typename SpriteType, typename = typename std::enable_if_t<std::is_base_of_v<sf::Transformable, SpriteType> && std::is_base_of_v<sf::Drawable, SpriteType>>>
class Sprite {
public:
    SpriteType s;
    // DO NOT PASS SpriteType here, put the whole Sprite<SpriteType>
    myclass<Sprite<SpriteType>> t;
    Sprite() {
    }
    auto foo() {
        return s;
    }

private:

};
  • Thank you for your response. I am so sorry - I am a beginner in C++. I am trying to implement the second suggestion and I am having trouble. Could you help me further please? – expl0it3r Jun 4 '20 at 21:03
  • Please describe the problem. – jvd Jun 4 '20 at 21:04
  • How is the additional MyClass parameter used in the second example? – expl0it3r Jun 4 '20 at 21:19
  • That was a generic decoupling approach. @Taekahn suggested an even better way to go, by cleaning up my_class from references to Sprite. I would suggest to use his solution. – jvd Jun 4 '20 at 21:23
  • I am trying to implement @Taekhan's solution but how could I impose the restricitons onto the template of SpriteType that I need (as mentioned in the problem) – expl0it3r Jun 4 '20 at 21:31
1

One of the great thing about templates is breaking type dependencies.
You could do something like this. Simplified for readability.

template<typename T>
class myclass
{
public:
    std::shared_ptr<T> ptr;
    myclass() {

    }
private:

};

template<typename SpriteType, typename = std::enable_if_t<std::is_base_of_v<base_class, SpriteType>>>
class Sprite {
public:
    SpriteType s;
    myclass<Sprite<SpriteType>> t;
    Sprite() {
    }
    auto foo() {
        return s;
    }

private:

};

That is one of many options.
Another option is to use an interface. i.e. a pure virtual base class that isn't a template.

Example: I think something like this should do it. Starting to get a hard to follow though.

class base_sprite
{
    public:
    virtual ~base_sprite(){};

    virtual int foo() = 0;
};

template<typename T>
class myclass
{
public:
    std::shared_ptr<base_sprite> ptr;

    myclass() : ptr(std::make_shared<T>())
    {

    };
};

template<typename SpriteType>
class Sprite : public base_sprite{
public:
    myclass<Sprite<SpriteType>> l;
    int foo() override {return 0;};
};
  • I am attempting to implement this but I cannot insert the template restrictions that I require onto SpriteTyp. – expl0it3r Jun 4 '20 at 21:30
  • I've fixedup / updated to add in a constraint, sorry about that. – Taekahn Jun 4 '20 at 22:19
  • No worries, thank you. Taekahn, how would I change this implementation such that my class is now a pure virtual base class, and whos deriviations actually change Sprite? Is this even possible? – expl0it3r Jun 4 '20 at 22:22
  • Yeah, Sprite probably makes the most amount of sense. I'll type something up. – Taekahn Jun 4 '20 at 22:29
  • I added an example, though now you could just make myclass take in the shared_ptr<base_sprite> and not have myclass as a template. Would probably be cleaner. – Taekahn Jun 4 '20 at 22:58

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.