7

I'm working on upgrading my project from Angular 8 to 9, and I've come across a problem with new requirements when extending classes.

According to Angular's documentation:

Undecorated base classes using Angular features

As of version 9, it's deprecated to have an undecorated base class that:

  • uses Angular features
  • is extended by a directive or component

Angular lifecycle hooks or any of the following Angular field decorators are considered Angular features:

  • @Input()
  • @Output()
  • @HostBinding()
  • @HostListener()
  • @ViewChild() / @ViewChildren()
  • @ContentChild() / @ContentChildren()

For @Component decorators, it requires a template or templateURL on the base class. Adding either causes the child class to not render it's template.

For example, the following result in nothing rendering on the view:

@Component({
  template: ''
})
export abstract class BaseComponent<T extends AbstractSuperEntity> extends Toggler implements OnChanges {
  @Input()
  year: number | string

  constructor(service: MyService) {

  }

  ngOnChanges() {
  }
}

@Component({
  templateUrl: 'my.component.html',
  selector: 'my-component'
})
export class MyComponent extends BaseComponent<AbstractSuperEntity> {

  constructor(service: MyService) {
    super(service);
  }

}

I tried changing the base class to use templateUrl pointing to an empty html, but that doesn't work either.

2
  • not exactly sure what you are trying to do, but in my projects I have a BaseComponent which is just a basic component (doesn't extend anything) and then I create my regular components which each "extends BaseComponent".
    – Rick
    Jun 5, 2020 at 19:43
  • @Rick, I was adding the @Component because the base component has lifecycle methods and other angular decorators. According to the documentation, in order for those to be recognized by angular you need to decorate the base component, too. As pointed out by the answer by Poul Kruijt, I should add @Directive() instead of @Component({...}) to my base component classes. I'm going to give that a try.
    – John Manko
    Jun 5, 2020 at 20:39

2 Answers 2

14

You have to add an empty @Directive() decorator. As far as I know, that should be enough:

@Directive()
export abstract class BaseComponent<T extends AbstractSuperEntity> extends Toggler implements OnChanges {
  @Input()
  year: number | string

  constructor(service: MyService) {

  }

  ngOnChanges() {
  }
}
6
  • So, @Directive() is added to a base "component"?
    – John Manko
    Jun 5, 2020 at 20:35
  • 2
    I should also point out that the examples provided by Angular show base directives using @Directive() and base components using @Component({...}). So, it's a little confusing on what they actual mean when the base is also abstract and has no intention on living of it's own. angular.io/guide/migration-undecorated-classes
    – John Manko
    Jun 5, 2020 at 20:47
  • 1
    @JohnManko you use an empty @Directive on your abstract class, if your extended components have their own Directive/Component declarations. You use a @Component/@Directive with declarations on your abstract class if the extended classes do not have any Component/directive declaration. It's not possible for both your abstract as extended to have something inside the class decorator. Jun 6, 2020 at 5:58
  • I am currently researching this issue as I have inherited getters and setters which are completely invisible to inheriting templates Apr 13, 2021 at 14:33
  • @CaptainPrinny you probably should create a new question, and if you want you can link it here. I can have a look at it, preferably with a stackblitz :D Apr 13, 2021 at 15:21
3

It's been quite a while after this question was asked, but I stumbled upon it so this might be useful to others as well.

You don't necessarily have to add the @Directive decorator. If it's a component just use @Component instead. That should work. See the following stackblitz example:

https://stackblitz.com/edit/angular-ivy-kehmwu?file=src/app/app.component.ts

In the question it's unclear what's wrong. An error message would help.

What also might've gone wrong is that the OP was not implementing the lifecycle method on the super call:

import { Component, OnInit, Input } from '@angular/core';

@Component({
  template: '',
})
export abstract class BaseComponent implements OnInit {
  @Input()
  year: number | string;

  constructor() {}

  ngOnInit() {
    console.log('This will only work if you call it in the child component');
  }
}

@Component({
  selector: 'child-component',
  template: '<p>test, year: {{ year }}</p>',
})
export class ChildComponent extends BaseComponent implements OnInit {
  constructor() {
    super();
  }

  ngOnInit() {
    super.ngOnInit();
  }
}

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