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According to java specifications the postfix operators (expr++ expr--) have higher precedence than unary operators ++expr --expr and must be evaluated first, but the result reflect like was evaluated just from left to right.

I learn for OCA exam and try to find an answer for my unenlighting but I don't find any explication...

    int a = 0;

    System.out.println(--a + a++); // why is -1 + -1 = -2     instead of   // 0 + 0  =  0

Edit: java docs say: Operators with higher precedence are evaluated before operators with relatively lower precedence.

First evaluation: a++ should changes the value of a, and returns the old a = 0

Second evaluation: --a should changes the value of a, and returns the new value = 0

but is not..

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1

Let's see what happens here, step by step

int a = 0;

System.out.println(--a + a++);
  1. Variable gets declared as int a = 0, cool
  2. On System.out.println(...) an evaluation happen, let's dig in it
  3. --a gets called so what happen here is a = a(0) - 1; then a = -1
  4. Now, a is -1.
  5. ++a gets called, so what happen here is int a, which now is -1 because it was modified by the previous statement, gets returned as it is (-1).
  6. The evaluation end, so we have -1 + -1 = -2; in the end as last operation int a gets incremented by one so we have a = (-1) + 1, but it does not matter anymore, the evaluation has ended with a being -1

I was watching you weren't getting it, so i wrote it in details, sorry if it took time.

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  • That is very clear, but why is the rule that postfix operator has higher priority over prefix? – Java Jun 5 at 22:54
  • If I start with a++ I have a different result – Java Jun 5 at 22:56
  • java docs say: Operators with higher precedence are evaluated before operators with relatively lower precedence – Java Jun 5 at 22:58
  • Precedence does not define order of execution as @Savior said. Please check the link Precedence of ++ and — operators in Java there is written everything you need to know :D – Snix Jun 5 at 23:08

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