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In a project/solution with lots of <PackageReference> dependencies, it can be difficult to find the source of a transitive dependency that's being pulled in. For example, no projects in my solution directly reference the package System.Data.SqlClient, but something is pulling it in transitively. Tracking that down "by hand" is virtually impossible in a large solution or project with lots of direct package references.

Is there any ready-made way (eg, a combination of .Net CLI commands) that, given a particular package, will find and reveal the source of the transitive reference? I use Rider, which has some awesome code navigation and "discovery"-type tools, but I can't find anything that helps with my goal.

Note: I also have VisualStudio if it has this capability built-in somewhere, I'd just need a pointer to where/how.

  • Please consider re-opening, I edited the question to remove reference to the naughty word, "tool." – E-Riz Jun 5 at 23:30
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The capability is built into the latest Visual Studio 2019.

With Visual Studio 2019, Update 6, I can see something like the following:

Solution explorer dependencies tree

Note that you can also discover packages by searching in the solution explorer.

Solution explorer search

Unfortunately it's not available in the NuGet Package Manager installed view yet.

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  • I tried that, but I don't think it's quite comprehensive because, for the specific package I'm trying to track down, it doesn't show any reference except in a project that isn't a dependency of the one I'm researching. – E-Riz Jun 5 at 23:33
  • I'm not following. How do you know that there's a reference to a package then? Note that packages can come in through project references too. – imps Jun 6 at 2:35
  • I know because I can use classes from the package. And yes, I'm aware of project references bringing in transitive dependencies, too. That's part of what makes finding them so tricky. – E-Riz Jun 7 at 22:52
  • Can you look at your project.assets.json file? The SolutionExplorer looks at that as the source of truth. Happy to peek at it if you can share the content. Keep in mind it might contain some PII info in the form of PATs and package names. On the other hand, does search not help? – imps Jun 8 at 23:09

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