15

Consider the following code:

MyTask = LongRunningMethod(progressReporter, CancelSource.Token)
    .ContinueWith(e => 
        { Log.Info("OnlyOnCanceled"); }, 
        default, 
        TaskContinuationOptions.OnlyOnCanceled,
        TaskScheduler.FromCurrentSynchronizationContext())
    .ContinueWith(e => 
        { Log.Info("OnlyOnFaulted"); }, 
        default, 
        TaskContinuationOptions.OnlyOnFaulted,
        TaskScheduler.FromCurrentSynchronizationContext())
    .ContinueWith(e => 
        { Log.Info("OnlyOnRanToCompletion"); }, 
        default,
        TaskContinuationOptions.OnlyOnRanToCompletion, 
        TaskScheduler.FromCurrentSynchronizationContext())
    .ContinueWith(e => 
        { Log.Info("None"); }, 
        default, 
        TaskContinuationOptions.None,
        TaskScheduler.FromCurrentSynchronizationContext());
  • When I cancel the task using the provided CancelSource, output is:
    OnlyOnCanceled
    None
    as expected.

  • When LongRunningMethod throws an Exception output is:
    OnlyOnFaulted
    None
    as expected.

  • When LongRunningMethod completes output is:
    None
    so the ContinueWith with TaskContinuationOptions.OnlyOnRanToCompletion is not executed as I would expect.

I checked MyTask.Status in the last ContinueWith branch and it is still Running. So with that in mind, I would expect OnlyOnRanToCompletion to be skipped. The question is, why is the Status still Running? Looking at the debug output, I can see that LongRunningMethod ran to the end.

  • How did you run MyTask? Also TaskContinuationOptions.OnlyOnRanToCompletion says that This option is not valid for multi-task continuations. – Pavel Anikhouski Jun 6 at 15:18
  • I am not sure what "multi-task continuations" refers to. That limitation is also mentioned for OnlyOnFaulted and OnlyOnCanceled but those seem to work as expected. – Rev1.0 Jun 6 at 15:26
  • 1
    "multi-task continuations" is more likely to refer to the usage of TaskContinuationOptions in conjunction with ContinueWhenAll than anything to do with the above example. It looks like you've got continuation tasks chained off each other rather than off the original parent, which is presumably the actual intention? – Ross Gurbutt Jun 6 at 15:41
7
0

It looks like you're chaining continuation tasks off each other rather than all off the original task. This will mean your TaskContinuationOptions are referring to the completion status of the previous task in the chain rather than the original parent (MyTask).
I would try something like the following (I can't try this exact version locally because I don't have all of your functions, but something similar worked for me).

    MyTask = LongRunningMethod(mods, Settings, progressReporter, CancelSource.Token);

    MyTask.ContinueWith(e =>
    {
        Log.Info("OnlyOnCanceled");
    }, default ,TaskContinuationOptions.OnlyOnCanceled, TaskScheduler.FromCurrentSynchronizationContext());

    MyTask.ContinueWith(e =>
    {
        Log.Info("OnlyOnFaulted");
    }, default ,TaskContinuationOptions.OnlyOnFaulted, TaskScheduler.FromCurrentSynchronizationContext());

    MyTask.ContinueWith(e =>
    {
        Log.Info("OnlyOnRanToCompletion");
    }, default ,TaskContinuationOptions.OnlyOnRanToCompletion, TaskScheduler.FromCurrentSynchronizationContext());

    MyTask.ContinueWith(e =>
    {
        Log.Info("None");
    }, default ,TaskContinuationOptions.None, TaskScheduler.FromCurrentSynchronizationContext());

This gave me:

OnlyOnRanToCompletion  
None
| improve this answer | |
  • Wow, indeed. Kind of an oversight on my side, but definitely a potential pitfall because everything else looked correct. Thx. – Rev1.0 Jun 6 at 18:40
5
0

As written in the docs:

you can specify that the continuation is to run only if the antecedent completes successfully, or only if it completes in a faulted state. If the condition is not true when the antecedent is ready to invoke the continuation, the continuation transitions directly to the TaskStatus.Canceled state and subsequently cannot be started.

That means that chaining ContinueWith calls will not work in your case because if first continuation will not match actual task status it will return canceled task to next chained call.

You can check that changing Task outcome and reordering continuation in this snippet:

var task = 
    //Task.FromCanceled(new CancellationToken(true))
    Task.FromException(new Exception())
    //Task.CompletedTask
        .ContinueWith(e => Console.WriteLine("OnlyOnCanceled"), TaskContinuationOptions.OnlyOnCanceled)
        .ContinueWith(e => Console.WriteLine("OnlyOnFaulted"), TaskContinuationOptions.OnlyOnFaulted)
        .ContinueWith(e => Console.WriteLine("OnlyOnRanToCompletion"), TaskContinuationOptions.OnlyOnRanToCompletion); 
Task.WaitAny(task); // to wait for task without exception and async
Console.WriteLine(task.Status);

Also setting up multiple separate continuations may be not an optimal solution, because you will be spawning multiple tasks when actually you need only one.

"Passing Data to a Continuation" section of the same doc suggests to analyze Task.Status property of the antecedent, for example:

Task.FromResult(1)
    .ContinueWith(t => 
    {   
        switch (t.Status)
        {
            case TaskStatus.RanToCompletion: Console.WriteLine("OnlyOnRanToCompletion"); return t.Result;
            case TaskStatus.Canceled: Console.WriteLine("OnlyOnCanceled"); return default;
            case TaskStatus.Faulted: Console.WriteLine("OnlyOnFaulted"); return default;
            default: return default;
        }
    });
| improve this answer | |
2
0

It would be probably simpler to do the logging using async-await. This way you could avoid the old-school ContinueWith method, and its confusing parameters and behavior.

public static async void OnCompletionLog(Task task, string name)
{
    try
    {
        await task;
        Log.Info($"{name} RanToCompletion");
    }
    catch (OperationCanceledException)
    {
        Log.Info($"{name} Canceled");
    }
    catch (Exception ex)
    {
        Log.Error(ex, $"{name} Failed");
    }
}
| improve this answer | |

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