35

I need to implement this:

static class MyStaticClass
{
    public const TimeSpan theTime = new TimeSpan(13, 0, 0);
    public static bool IsTooLate(DateTime dt)
    {
        return dt.TimeOfDay >= theTime;
    }
}

theTime is a constant (seriously :-), like π is, in my case it'd be pointless to read it from settings, for example. And I'd like it to be initialized once and never changed.

But C# doesn't seem to allow a constant to be initialized by a function (which a constructor is). How to overcome this?

59

Using readonly instead of const can be initialized and not modified after that. Is that what you're looking for?

Code example:

static class MyStaticClass
{
    public static readonly TimeSpan theTime;
    static MyStaticClass
    {
        theTime = new TimeSpan(13, 0, 0)
    }
}
  • 7
    Downvoters: please explain why you are downvoting an answer that solved the OP's question. If it's not a good solution at least explain why. – ashelvey Jun 3 '11 at 23:13
  • because being objective is very hard ;) – Dmitry Matveev May 2 '15 at 21:58
  • 4
    I use this in my own code, but my anal retentive personality knows that every time I do this there is a long living object in memory of my application. I have a long running application that already uses a too much memory, and it just bothers me. I wish there was a TimeSpan literal that would just get compiled in to my code. The alternative is to have an const int, converting my TimeSpan value to miliseconds... but math. – Dude0001 Jul 24 '15 at 14:52
  • 1
    Readonly isn't a correct analog to const. Instead you'd want to use static readonly, as mentioned in James's answer below. – Josh Nov 18 '15 at 0:45
  • 3
    readonly static doesn't work with switch cases and default parameters. We still need const. – Pangamma Sep 6 '18 at 18:05
37

Constants have to be compile time constant, and the compiler can't evaluate your constructor at compile time. Use readonly and a static constructor.

static class MyStaticClass
{
  static MyStaticClass()
  {
     theTime = new TimeSpan(13, 0, 0);
  }

  public static readonly TimeSpan theTime;
  public static bool IsTooLate(DateTime dt)
  {
    return dt.TimeOfDay >= theTime;
  }
}

In general I prefer to initialise in the constructor rather than by direct assignment as you have control over the order of initialisation.

  • theTime should be static as well. So that there's only one, and so that the above example compiles. – pickypg Jun 3 '11 at 18:48
  • 5
    Why a constructor? Just describing a member as public static readonly TimeSpan theTime = new TimeSpan(13, 0, 0) seems to work (no compilation errors at least). – Ivan Jun 3 '11 at 18:49
  • 6
    @pickypg - sorry my mistake - fixed. @Ivan - I added a comment on that. I personally dislike direct initialisation as you need to search a class to find out where things are initialised. Putting initialisation always in the constructor is consistent and you can easily see what the initial state of a class is. You also have direct control over the order in which initialisation takes place. In a trivial static class case there probably isn't much difference. But good practice is good practice - especially in the edge cases. – James Gaunt Jun 3 '11 at 18:53
  • 8
    The greatest benefit to using a ctor for member initialization is that you get the opportunity to catch and handle exceptions in the context that they are raised. – Steve Guidi Jun 3 '11 at 19:00
10

C#'s const does not have the same meaning as C++'s const. In C#, const is used to essentially define aliases to literals (and can therefore only be initialized with literals). readonly is closer to what you want, but keep in mind that it only affects the assignment operator (the object isn't really constant unless its class has immutable semantics).

  • 4
    Worth mentioning here that static readonly fields can be changed via reflection, while const cannot. – GDS Aug 8 '16 at 23:51
7

From this link:

Constants must be a value type (sbyte, byte, short, ushort, int, uint, long, ulong, char, float, double, decimal, or bool), an enumeration, a string literal, or a reference to null.

If you want to create an object, it must be done so as static readonly:

static class MyStaticClass
{
  public static readonly TimeSpan theTime = new TimeSpan(13, 0, 0);
  public static bool IsTooLate(DateTime dt)
  {
    return dt.TimeOfDay >= theTime;
  }
}
4
public static readonly TimeSpan theTime = new TimeSpan(13, 0, 0);
1

Constant represents a static member whose value can never change. This means that a constant value is defined in compile time.
With the statement:

    public const TimeSpan theTime = new TimeSpan(13, 0, 0);

Are violated two axioms of constant fields:

  • Only the C# built-in types (excluding System.Object) may be declared as const.
  • Iniatialization value must be evaluated in compile time

In the question is used the TimeSpan type, which is not built-in (predefined) Type. This means that the csc.exe compiler cannot recognize it.
If you use a built-in C# type (e.g. String) and you want to initialize the constant member with a compile time value, you still get an error: e.g.

 public const string MyNumber = SetMyString();
 private string SetMyString()
 {
  return "test";
 }

Solving the problem you can declare a member with:

static readonly

modifier if you want to declare a field only once in runtime:

public static readonly string MyNumber = SetMyString();
private static string SetMyString()
{
 return "test";
}
0

You can use the readonly keyword:

When a field declaration includes a readonly modifier, assignments to the fields introduced by the declaration can only occur as part of the declaration or in a constructor in the same class.

Example (copied from the linked MSDN page):

class Age
{
    readonly int _year;
    Age(int year)
    {
        _year = year;
    }
    void ChangeYear()
    {
        //_year = 1967; // Compile error if uncommented.
    }
}

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