29

I have a list of values like this,

lst = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8]

Desired Output:

window size = 3
    1  # first element in the list
    forward = [2, 3, 4]
    backward = []

    2  # second element in the list
    forward = [3, 4, 5]
    backward = [1]

    3  # third element in the list
    forward = [4, 5, 6]
    backward = [1, 2]

    4  # fourth element in the list
    forward = [5, 6, 7]
    backward = [1, 2, 3]

    5  # fifth element in the list
    forward = [6, 7, 8]
    backward = [2, 3, 4]

    6  # sixth element in the list
    forward = [7, 8]
    backward = [3, 4, 5]

    7  # seventh element in the list
    forward = [8]
    backward = [4, 5, 6]

    8  # eight element in the list
    forward = []
    backward = [5, 6, 7]

Lets assume a window size of 4, now my desired output:

for each_element in the list, I want 4 values in-front and 4 values backward ignoring the current value.

I was able to use this to get sliding window of values but this also not giving me the correct required output.

import more_itertools
list(more_itertools.windowed([1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8], n=3))
4
  • Reverse the list? Jun 11, 2020 at 3:21
  • @MoonCheesez For first element in the list that is 0, we only have 4 values infront but we don't have values backward because it's the first values. Can you share an example of what you mean?
    – user_12
    Jun 11, 2020 at 3:27
  • It will be helpful if you add expected output
    – anuragal
    Jun 11, 2020 at 3:29
  • @anuragal I have updated the question with desired output.
    – user_12
    Jun 11, 2020 at 3:37

8 Answers 8

15

Code:

arr = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8]
window = 3
for backward, current in enumerate(range(len(arr)), start = 0-window):
    if backward < 0:
        backward = 0
    print(arr[current+1:current+1+window], arr[backward:current])

Output:

[2, 3, 4], []
[3, 4, 5], [1]
[4, 5, 6], [1, 2]
[5, 6, 7], [1, 2, 3]
[6, 7, 8], [2, 3, 4]
[7, 8], [3, 4, 5]
[8], [4, 5, 6]
[], [5, 6, 7]

One Liner:

print(dict([(e, (lst[i+1:i+4], lst[max(i-3,0):i])) for i,e in enumerate(last)]))

Output:

{1: ([2, 3, 4], []),
 2: ([3, 4, 5], [1]),
 3: ([4, 5, 6], [1, 2]),
 4: ([5, 6, 7], [1, 2, 3]),
 5: ([6, 7, 8], [2, 3, 4]),
 6: ([7, 8], [3, 4, 5]),
 7: ([8], [4, 5, 6]),
 8: ([], [5, 6, 7])}

Credit: thanks to suggestions from @FeRD and @Androbin, the solution now looks better

3
  • 1
    I had it as a one-line list comprehension, except I couldn't solve the backwards window on the first 3 items (well, the second and third really) without that if i < 0 test: print.pprint(dict([(e, (lst[i-3:i], lst[i+1:i+4])) for i,e in enumerate(lst)]))
    – FeRD
    Jun 11, 2020 at 17:40
  • I faced the same issue as well, couldn't get rid of i<0 Jun 13, 2020 at 4:53
  • 3
    @AnuragWagh Try max(backward, 0)
    – Androbin
    Jun 28, 2020 at 14:30
12

This should get you started:

from dataclasses import dataclass
from typing import List

@dataclass
class Window:
  index: int
  backward: List[int]
  forward: List[int]

def window(iterable, window_size, index):
  backward = iterable[max(0, index - window_size):index]
  forward = iterable[index + 1:index + 1 + window_size]
  return Window(index, backward, forward)
>>> window([1,2,3,4,5,6], 3, 0)
Window(index=0, backward=[], forward=[2, 3, 4])
>>> window([1,2,3,4,5,6], 3, 5)
Window(index=5, backward=[3, 4, 5], forward=[])

I would also suggest adding some checks whether the index and window size make sense.

If you are stuck with an older Python version that doesn't have dataclasses yet, you can use Named Tuples instead.

0
8

This will work with more_itertools.windowed if you adjust the window size. Since you want 7 items (3 backward, 1 current, 3 forward), set the window size to 7.

from itertools import chain
from more_itertools import windowed
n = 3
iterable = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8]
# pad the iterable so you start with an empty backward window
it = chain([None] * n, iterable, [None] * n)

for window in windowed(it, n * 2 + 1):
    print(window[n])
    print('forward =', [x for x in window[n + 1:] if x is not None])
    print('backward =', [x for x in window[:n] if x is not None])

The output is:

1
forward = [2, 3, 4]
backward = []

2
forward = [3, 4, 5]
backward = [1]

3
forward = [4, 5, 6]
backward = [1, 2]

4
forward = [5, 6, 7]
backward = [1, 2, 3]

5
forward = [6, 7, 8]
backward = [2, 3, 4]

6
forward = [7, 8]
backward = [3, 4, 5]

7
forward = [8]
backward = [4, 5, 6]

8
forward = []
backward = [5, 6, 7]
2

Your sliding window reminds me of another data structure: fixed-size stacks. If you think about it, what you want is actually a fixed-size stack of 7 elements where the right three are the forward window elements and the back three are the back window elements. The 4th element is the current element. Here's how I would do it:

import collections

my_list = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8]

window = collections.deque([], 7)

for i in my_list:
    window.append(i)

    # Get the back three elements
    forward_window = list(window)[-3:]
    # Get the front three elements
    backward_window = list(window)[:len(window)-4]

    print()
    print(list(forward_window))
    print(list(backward_window))

Of course, the code is not exactly what you want as the stack needs to be primed with some starting elements but that can be done with a bit more work:

import collections

my_list = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8]

# Start with the first three elements
window = collections.deque(my_list[:3], 7)

# Iterate from the fourth element
for i in my_list[3:]:
    window.append(i)
    forward_window = list(window)[-3:]
    backward_window = list(window)[:len(window)-4]
    print()
    print(list(forward_window))
    print(list(backward_window))

After that you just need to clear the stack by adding some empty elements:

while len(window) != 4:
    window.popleft()
    forward_window = list(window)[4:]
    backward_window = list(window)[:3]
    print()
    print(list(forward_window))
    print(list(backward_window))
1
  • Good answers with detailed explanations
    – Parag
    Jun 21, 2020 at 16:25
2

Here is the quick code I wrote

lst = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8]
sliding_window_size = 3

def get_sliding_list(l, index):
    l_list = []
    r_list = []

    min_range = 0
    if index > sliding_window_size:
        min_range = index - sliding_window_size

    max_range = len(l)
    if index + sliding_window_size < len(l):
        max_range = index + sliding_window_size + 1

    return (l[min_range:index], l[index + 1:max_range])

print(get_sliding_list(lst, 0))
print(get_sliding_list(lst, 1))
print(get_sliding_list(lst, 2))
print(get_sliding_list(lst, 3))
print(get_sliding_list(lst, 4))
print(get_sliding_list(lst, 5))
print(get_sliding_list(lst, 6))
print(get_sliding_list(lst, 7))

Output

([], [2, 3, 4])
([1], [3, 4, 5])
([1, 2], [4, 5, 6])
([1, 2, 3], [5, 6, 7])
([2, 3, 4], [6, 7, 8])
([3, 4, 5], [7, 8])
([4, 5, 6], [8])
([5, 6, 7], [])

Pass index of the element for which you want to retrieve sliding window

4
  • For eight element it is returning ([6, 7, 8], []) which is not the required. Can you check once. It suppose to be returning ([5, 6, 7], []) while ignoring the current element 8
    – user_12
    Jun 11, 2020 at 4:01
  • 8th element has index 7, so for 8th element call print(get_sliding_list(lst, 7))
    – anuragal
    Jun 11, 2020 at 4:04
  • If you use zero-indexing, In that case shouldn't 8 return index error.
    – user_12
    Jun 11, 2020 at 4:05
  • A check can be added for that and exception can be raised
    – anuragal
    Jun 11, 2020 at 4:07
2

You can just use min and max to make sure you stay within the list (no loops needed) .

lst = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8]
ws = 3 # window

st = 3 # starting point

mn = max(st-ws-1, 0)
mx = min(st+ws, len(lst))
print('Forward = ',lst[st:mx])
print('Backward = ', lst[mn:st-1])

Output:

Forward =  [4, 5, 6]
Backward =  [1, 2]
1
  • 1
    if you comment your variables, it might be a good idea to give them more verbose names instead Jun 17, 2020 at 7:03
2

Here's a short and neat code based on list comprehension.

forward = [lst[i+1:i+1+window] for i in range(len(lst)]
backward = [lst[::-1][i+1:i+1+window] for i in range(len(lst)] # first reverse the input list and do same as did in forward
out = zip(forward,backward[::-1]) # first reverse the backward list and zip two list into one

Output

>>> forward
[[2, 3, 4], [3, 4, 5], [4, 5, 6], [5, 6, 7], [6, 7, 8], [7, 8], [8], []]
>>> backward
[[7, 6, 5], [6, 5, 4], [5, 4, 3], [4, 3, 2], [3, 2, 1], [2, 1], [1], []]
>>> out
[([2, 3, 4], []), ([3, 4, 5], [1]), ([4, 5, 6], [2, 1]), ([5, 6, 7], [3, 2, 1]), ([6, 7, 8], [4, 3, 2]), ([7, 8], [5, 4, 3]), ([8], [6, 5, 4]), ([], [7, 6, 5])]

1
[ll[i-4:i+4] for i in range(4, len(ll)-4)]

does the trick, I should think.

1
  • It's not giving the correct output. I have updated the question with required output.
    – user_12
    Jun 11, 2020 at 3:38

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