Just a quick question - and I'm sure really basic!

I have the following code:

function checkThings($foo, $bar) {
    ...
    if ($valid) {
        return $results;
    } else {
        return false;
    }
}

On the other end of this I am currently doing

$check = checkThings($foo, $bar);
if ($check === false) {
    echo "Error";
} else {
    echo $check;
}

Is writing the following the same?

$check = checkThings($foo, $bar);
if (!$check) {
    echo "Error";
} else {
    echo $check;
}

Which method is the preferred method if both are correct?

Thanks :)

up vote 45 down vote accepted

The triple-equal operator is type-sensitive. So when you check:

if ($check === false)

... it will only be true if $check is the boolean value "false". Wheras

if ($check == false)

... is not checking specifically for boolean false, but a "falsey" value. False, in PHP, equals zero, null is "falsey", as is an empty string ("" == false == null, but "" !== false !== null). So:

$check = 0;
if ($check == false)

... evaluates to true.

The ! prefix operator is equivalent to ==. So when zero needs to be a discrete value from boolean false, the ! and == operators are not sufficient.

Check out the docs for comparison operators here: http://php.net/manual/en/language.operators.comparison.php

It is best practice to make your conditional checks as specific as possible. This is not only to avoid potential oversights in your logic, but also to make the code more maintainable for future developers. Imagine encountering a line of code like this:

if (check_something($variable)) {
  // do stuff
}

I can assume the check_something function is returning a boolean value true. But, unless I go dig up the check_something function, it could also be returning an non-empty string, a number... who knows! Much more clear to do this:

if (check_something($variable) === true) {
  // do stuff
}

Now, just by looking, I know that the check_something function is expected to return a true value. I might not know what the function does, but at least it is exactly clear what it returns. Another common example you see EVERYWHERE:

if (!$_GET['value']) {
  // do something
}

This is a pet peeve. A conditional statement should always be comparing things clearly. So, you'd want to do:

if (array_key_exists('value', $_GET) !== false && $_GET['value'] === '1') {
  // do something
}

Now, you can tell that I am not only checking to see if the query string parameter exists, but also whether it is equal to a specific value.

In summary, the single ! prefix operator and the == operator are rarely useful and always ambiguous. You're best served by writing your code in a way that documents itself, or is translatable into human language to express the logic at play. A direct comparison using either !== or ===, where appropriate, is a good habit, good practice, and the least likely to produce unexpected results in your code.

  • 1
    BTW, this is a problem specific to php (and perhaps other loosely typed languages), due to its extreme willingness to automatically convert values from one type to another. In strongly typed languages (e.g. Java, C#, C++), most programmers prefer concise syntax such as !value ("not value") instead of value == false or value === false. In those languages, the compiler will complain if value is not a Boolean type, so the concise form is safe. "not value" has a clear meaning, both in logic and in human language; it is only the "looseness" of php that makes this form poor to use. – ToolmakerSteve May 13 '16 at 19:03
  • ^ and javascript to an extent – Chris Baker May 13 '16 at 19:27

=== false checks type, (!$check) evaluates the value and will fail for values returned such as null, '' (empty string) and zero(0)

=== is most correct

They are similar, but not exactly the same. The !$check is a loose checker, meaning 0 and null would evaluate to true as well. The === is a strict checker, meaning it must be false.

For a more indepth explanation: PHP Types Comparisons

== does a value comparison where === does a bitwise.

// will return true only when $value = false
if( $value === false )

// will return true when $value = 0, $value = "", $value = null, etc
if( $value == false )
if( !$value )
  • 1
    === compares value and type of the 2 things. It's not bitwise. – Rocket Hazmat Jun 3 '11 at 19:45
  • Agree with @Rocket - this is incorrect – Chris Baker Jun 3 '11 at 20:03
  • It's the first time I heard about bitwise regarding the === operator. More info could be helpful. – JohnnyQ Jun 8 '16 at 4:35

I would prefer your second method, but put the positive check first (if($check) instead).

  • This would fail for the same reasons as using !$check. He really should use $check !== FALSE. – Rocket Hazmat Jun 3 '11 at 19:47

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