40
  1. What advantages does it offer over std::thread?
  2. Will it deprecate the existing std::thread?
1

3 Answers 3

61

std::jthread is like std::thread, only without the stupid. See, std::thread's destructor would terminate the program if you didn't join or detach it manually beforehand. This led to tons of bugs, as people would expect it to join on destruction.

jthread fixes this; it joins on destruction by default (hence the name: "joining thread"). It also supports a mechanism to ask a thread to halt execution, though there is no enforcement of this (aka: you can't make another thread stop executing).

At present, there is no plan to deprecate std::thread.

8
  • 2
    @Waqar: You could see it that way, but it's not necessarily implemented that way. Jun 11, 2020 at 13:43
  • 4
    f wonder who's bright idea it was to try to cram in a suspend execution feature. Thst never works. It hasn't worked anywhere in 30 years of threads. Everyone will have to use their own explicit condition variables just as they always have.
    – Zan Lynx
    Jun 11, 2020 at 13:44
  • 5
    @ZanLynx it has an explicit condition variable, which it passes to the function it runs.
    – Caleth
    Jun 11, 2020 at 13:58
  • 4
    @Waqar you take a std::stop_token as the first parameter of your function, and periodically check if stop_requested is true
    – Caleth
    Jun 11, 2020 at 14:00
  • 1
    @alexpanter no, detaching is sth else, well… detaching. All it means is that jthread is semantically equivalent to this struct jthread : std::thread { using std::thread::thread; ~jthread() { join(); } }; (stopping omitted on purpose). It means that a. if function in thread returned, thread’s handle can be just destructed b. if it didn’t, the program will block and wait for it upon destruction of the handle (jthread object). In some contexts it may act in a manner similar to detaching but it’s by no means the same.
    – alagner
    Aug 26, 2023 at 17:30
1

Here are the key differences between std::jthread and std::thread:

  1. Automatic Joining:

    • In the case of std::jthread, the thread is automatically joined when its destructor is called.
    • For std::thread, if the thread is still joinable upon destruction, it leads to a call to std::terminate, potentially causing errors in applications (not terminating all threads).
    • Using std::jthread eliminates the need to explicitly join threads and helps in avoiding issues related to incomplete thread termination.
  2. Enhanced Control with std::stop_token:

    • std::jthread provides more control over thread execution through the use of std::stop_token.
    • The std::stop_token is a mechanism to send a stop request to the thread's execution. It operates as a request, allowing for controlled termination if properly handled within the thread's execution.
    • For further details on std::stop_token, you can refer to the official documentation.

In summary, std::jthread simplifies thread management by automatically handling joining during destruction and offers additional control over thread execution using std::stop_token.

-6

The standard library provides std::jthread, which is a “joining thread” that follows RAII by having its destructor join(). Joining is done by destructors, so the order is the reverse of construction. When using std::jthread pay attention to RAII semantics.

int main() {

    long v {0};
    std::jthread t([&v]() {
        for (size_t i = 0; i++ < 10;)
            v++;
        });
        
    std::cout << v << ' '; // will print 0
}

This will print 0 at the output since joining has done at the end of the block (after std::cout << ...)

int main() {

    long v {0};
        {
            std::jthread t([&v]() {
                for (size_t i = 0; i++ < 10;)
                    v++;

              std::cout << v << ' '; // will print 10
                });
        }
}

This will print 10 properly.
As for std::thread deprecation, I don't think it happens at least in near future.

2
  • 3
    The first example printing 0 depends on the OS's schedule. In a high-load system, the first example might also print 10. Your example is not appropriate.
    – walkerlala
    Jun 27, 2023 at 2:13
  • 3
    This is a data race and UB. Anyone reading this should never do this.
    – Passer By
    Aug 26, 2023 at 7:07

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.