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When using Peewee I follow the advice from the Create "query methods" in Peewee Models Python answer:

class Person(Model):
    name = CharField()
    age = IntegerField()

    @classmethod
    def adults(cls):
        return cls.select().where(cls.age > 18)

I create class methods for all my queries to keep my model "fat" and everything else "thin". Now I introduced a foreign key and I'm struggling with this approach, because Peewee requires me to use model class directly in the query:

class Metric(Model):
    person = ForeignKeyField(Person, backref='metrics')
    name = CharField()
    value = IntegerField()

Other file:

class Person(Model):
    name = CharField()
    age = IntegerField()

    @classmethod
    def popular(cls, min_likes):
        return cls.select(cls, Metric).join(Metric).where(Metric.name == 'likes', Metric.value > min_likes)

This won't work, as the Metric definition depends on Person and vice versa, causing a circular import. The documentation has a section Circular foreign key dependencies, where the solution to similar situations is DeferredForeignKey, but I don't like it, as it adds overhead in code (foreign keys need to be created manually everywhere) and because my app is using SQLite - the docs explicitly state the following:

Because SQLite has limited support for altering tables, foreign-key constraints cannot be added to a table after it has been created.

If I understand it correctly, that effectively means I'd actually lose the FK constraint completely. I want the constraint though, the app relies on the fact that records with missing counterparts throw exceptions.

Is there a different workaround I'm overlooking? Is having fat models like this a recommended practice with Peewee after all? I like it, but it got me into a dead end in my models design. The docs even say:

My personal opinion is that circular foreign keys are a code smell and should be refactored (by adding an intermediary table, for instance).


Update: I updated the question as originally I unintentionally omitted the main detail: I'm coping with circular imports, not just dependencies between the classes. If I collocate the classes to one file, it's gonna work, because Python resolves the names in classmethods only when they're called, but that's not what I'm solving, I'd like to keep the classes in separate modules.

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I don't think you understand Python scoping. There's nothing wrong with referencing a related model inside a method body, e.g.:

# Move metric below Person.
class Person(Model):
    name = CharField()
    age = IntegerField()

    @classmethod
    def popular(cls, min_likes):
        return cls.select(cls, Metric).join(Metric).where(Metric.name == 'likes', Metric.value > min_likes)


class Metric(Model):
    person = ForeignKeyField(Person, backref='metrics')
    name = CharField()
    value = IntegerField()

Alternatively you can use DeferredForeignKey which is built exactly for this purpose.

| improve this answer | |
  • Oh! I skipped one part in my question which, I realized only after your answer, is perhaps essential to my problem. The code I have suffers from circular imports, as I keep every model in a separate file. As you correctly note, in a single file Python doesn't have a problem referencing stuff which doesn't exist yet, that is in functions. – Honza Javorek Jun 12 at 7:04
  • I'm unsure now if I should accept your answer as it's a correct answer to the question asked, or whether I should edit my question to address my actual problem :( – Honza Javorek Jun 12 at 7:05
  • You omitted the main detail. The circular import problem is solved by putting both models in the same file or introducing a 3rd module that imports the other two. – coleifer Jun 12 at 13:38
  • I omitted it unintentionally - tired to simplify my example for StackOverflow and didn't realize that imports are the main problem, because in the same file Python resolves the names. 3rd module is a traditional way to avoid circ. imports, but the classmethods belong to the model classes, so it's impossible to achieve. – Honza Javorek Jun 16 at 8:35
  • Would you please edit your answer or post a new one, which says something along the lines of "the only sensible solution to your problem is to put those two models into a single file"? I'd like to mark that as a correct answer. – Honza Javorek Jun 24 at 14:25
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I came up with an ugly workaround. For the sake of completeness I'm posting it as an answer to my own question, but I don't like the solution, so I won't accept it as the answer.

Given the package structure looks like this:

models/
    __init__.py
    person.py
    metric.py

And given the __init__.py looks something like this:

from .person import Person
from .metric import Metric

Allows for simplified importing: from models import Person instead of from models.person import Person

Then the workaround could be an ugly third file with just the properties of one of the models. For example, person_attrs.py:

models/
    __init__.py
    person.py
    person_attrs.py
    metric.py

The files would have the following contents. Person:

class Person(Model):
    name = CharField()
    age = IntegerField()

Metric:

from .person import Person

class Metric(Model):
    person = ForeignKeyField(Person, backref='metrics')
    name = CharField()
    value = IntegerField()

Person attributes:

from .metric import Metric

__all__ = ['popular']

@classmethod
def popular(cls, min_likes):
    return cls.select(cls, Metric).join(Metric).where(Metric.name == 'likes', Metric.value > min_likes)

Then the __init__.py works as the glue:

from .person import Person
from .metrics import Metric


from . import person_attrs  # isort:skip

for attr_name in person_attrs.__all__:
    setattr(Person, attr_name, getattr(person_attrs, attr_name))

The workaround abuses __all__ (but I think it's still better to be explicit than to look up the attributes with an implicit algorithm), and the order of imports in __init__.py becomes significant. The person_attrs.py allows for defining both @classmethod and @property methods, which can now use the other model Metric freely as they wish, but for the price of being expelled into a separate file as top-level objects, only to be united with the Person model in the models package root.

Obviously not nice, not straightforward, kinda ugly, but I couldn't come up with anything else yet apart from putting the models together into one file.

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