9

Suppose I have the following static method and interface (List is java.util.List). Note that the static method enforces a "super Foo" on the wildcard type of the list.

public class StaticMethod {
   public static void doSomething(List<? super Foo> fooList) {
      ...
   }
}

public interface MyInterface<T> {
   public void aMethod(List<T> aList);
}

I would like to be able to add a class which implements the interface using the static method as follows:

public class MyClass<T> implements MyInterface<T> {
   public void aMethod(List<T> aList) {
     StaticMethod.doSomething(aList);
   }
}

This obviously won't compile because T does not have the "super Foo" constraint. However, I can't see any way of adding the "super Foo" constraint. For example - the following is not legal:

public class MyClass<T super Foo> implements MyInterface<T> {
   public void aMethod(List<T> aList) {
     StaticMethod.doSomething(aList);
   }
}

Is there any way of solving this problem - ideally without altering StaticMethod or MyInterface?

3
  • I assume you can't require that MyClass implements MyInterface<Long>? Would work but doesn't quite get at what you want. – Sean Owen Jun 4 '11 at 11:00
  • FYI: Angelika Langer covers lower bounds for types here – McDowell Jun 4 '11 at 11:53
  • @McDowell That's helpful. Interesting that lower bounds are allowed on wilcards. I need to think this through a bit more - whether this example provides a counterexample to Angelika Langer's argument – Nick Fortescue Jun 4 '11 at 12:01
1

I'm going out on a limb here, but I think lower bounding is the problem here, because you have to know about the actual class that fits the bound when you refer to it... you can't use inheritance.

Here's a usage that compiles, but notice that I need to name the actual class that is a super of Foo:

class SomeOtherClass
{
}

class Foo extends SomeOtherClass
{
}

class StaticMethod
{
    public static <T> void doSomething(List<? super Foo> fooList)
    {
    }
}

interface MyInterface<T>
{
    public void aMethod(List<T> aList);
}

class MySpecificClass implements MyInterface<SomeOtherClass>
{
    public void aMethod(List<SomeOtherClass> aList)
    {
        StaticMethod.doSomething(aList);
    }
}

Comments?

p.s. I like the question :)

1
  • This clarifies the problem a bit - now MyClass is no longer generic (as you said) it requires the upper bound to be explicitly specified. Not quite a solution, but I'm not sure a solution is possible in the Java language as it stands. Oh well, I might have to live with MyClass not being generic. – Nick Fortescue Jun 4 '11 at 11:37
0

If you are sure that aList contains objects that can be safely cast to <? super Foo>, then you can do:

public static class MyClass<T> implements MyInterface<T> {
    @Override
    public void aMethod(List<T> aList) {
        StaticMethod.doSomething((List<? super Foo>) aList);
    }
}

See the complete and working example: http://ideone.com/fvm67

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.