8

I had compiled a simple hello world program in C with the MinGW compiler using the command line. As it had finished compiling, windows defender popped up and detected a virus (Trojan:Win32/Fuery.C!cl).

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
int main() {
    printf("Hello World");
    return 0;
}

https://imgur.com/a/05yDjw5

I had taken action on this (Removed) as windows defender suggested, but when I compile again the same happened, multiple times.

I had downloaded an AntiVirus (Malwarebytes) and scanned my whole system and it detected some registry key errors, but not this.

I've tried compiling C++ files too, but windows defender did not detect any virus there. This only happens when I compile in C.

I've also tried checking the compiled executable at VirusTotal. https://www.virustotal.com/gui/file/476d47215dad80db49c9fd508ab5e10e5aeb5b623248ca156830a28b70affe5f/detection

I tried CodeBlock's MinGW compiler and 0 engines detected it. (Same C file) https://www.virustotal.com/gui/file/8ba4b0fa24b1b6b69152acce2353fcca8447bbecbfc4e5ec48d33cc75d94f2f1/detection

EDIT: I deleted the path variable of C:/MinGW and added CodeBlock's MinGW compiler. I then used the command line to compile the same C file again and had uploaded the .exe file to VirusTotal. This time, 0 engines detected. So I have come to the conclusion that, the MinGW compiler that I had installed was creating this problem. https://www.virustotal.com/gui/file/34d383f6c09f897d8c9a44ed0e7850574320e50fdf439eeb1f06705fdcc95386/detection

I don't know why this happens. Is there a malware in my computer that affects my C programs or is this a false detection?

9
  • 3
    Sounds like a Windows Defender false positive. Jun 13 '20 at 19:15
  • im going to define this as a false detection but if anyone has an answers please let me know!!
    – tan
    Jun 13 '20 at 19:33
  • @Evg, yes i also tried that before but failed to mention it. i have done it again and 31 engines have detected it as unsafe
    – tan
    Jun 13 '20 at 19:39
  • After I installed Windows 10 Defender scanned all my drives, deleting every executable I had made myself, without warning. It wasn't long before I went back to Windows 7 and AVG, which would warn me until I configured it to ignore certain folders (and their children). Jun 13 '20 at 19:50
  • 1
    @tan Interestingly enough, sounds very similar to the issue reported here for VC++.
    – dxiv
    Jun 14 '20 at 3:14
5

There is no malware, it is a false positive. The executable generated by your version of MinGW looks very similar to a particular virus.

To avoid the problem, add the directory where you build your code to the list of exclusion in the antivirus.

Also consider using mingw-w64 instead of mingw.org .

4

A possibility that should be considered is that you already have malware on your computer, and that malware is simply injecting its own code into your created .exe file. Your antivirus software then might detect the harmful code in your new .exe. This is a real possibility when you get that many detections with Virustotal from so many trustworthy providers.

Registry cleaners are often hoaxes. Antivirus software claiming to include registry cleaners are suspicious. What's the name of the software you used?

Uninstall whatever antivirus software you used and install Malwarebytes. Enable rootkit detection in the settings, run a full scan with that, then a full scan with Windows Defender.

6
  • 1
    You can't uninstall Windows Defender, and it's also highly unlikely that this is actual malware. Jun 14 '20 at 3:44
  • 2
    @JosephSible-ReinstateMonica I clearly didn't say to uninstall Windows Defender, if that were even possible. The poster stated "I had downloaded an AntiVirus ... and it detected some registry key errors". No trustworthy antivirus claims to detect registry errors, therefore that piece of software should be removed. howtogeek.com/171633/…
    – Guy Keogh
    Jun 14 '20 at 4:00
  • 1
    the antivirus software i used was actually malwarebytes, and i scanned my whole system with it with everything enabled, including rootkit detection! it only detected registry errors and i had removed them. but windows defender still detects C programs as malware. i will run a full scan on malwarebytes again and then on windows defender and see what happens then thanks
    – tan
    Jun 14 '20 at 5:24
  • 1
    i do not think so that is the problem. i do not think my computer is ówned or "hackéd" by someone else. because it's only C program executable.. everything else is just fine
    – tan
    Jun 14 '20 at 7:40
  • 1
    @tan if you've scanned with both Malwarebytes and Windows Defender, I think it's safe to rule out malware. Antivirus softwares might be thinking something about how the executable was compiled is typical for malware. In that case, all you can do is compile the executables in the other ways that work.
    – Guy Keogh
    Jun 14 '20 at 13:03
2

I may have solved my problem.

This is what I did: I removed the PATH Variable of C:\MinGW and added CodeBlock's MinGW compiler (CodeBlocks/MinGW/bin). I used the command line to compile the same C file, and had uploaded the .exe to VirusTotal. No engines detected this file! https://www.virustotal.com/gui/file/34d383f6c09f897d8c9a44ed0e7850574320e50fdf439eeb1f06705fdcc95386/detection

So I have come to a conclusion that, MinGW was the compiler that was causing this problem. I have removed it.

However, I am not quite sure if this problem is FULLY solved. There is still a possibility of malware affecting my executable (or perhaps not). I cannot be sure.

If anyone has any answers, please comment or answer

3
  • 1
    This does not rule-out your original mingw-gcc being compromised. Compile a few more source files with it and see if they are all flagged -- if not, then it was likely a false positive issue. If they are all infected -- you still have problems... Jun 14 '20 at 8:48
  • yes I shall.. and if the problem still occurs, I shall let you know
    – tan
    Jun 14 '20 at 9:01
  • Hi it has been 3 days and I've had no detection. I think my problem has been solved and my question answered. PS: StackOverflow is great!!
    – tan
    Jun 16 '20 at 9:11
0

I ran into this after installing MinGW on 01-08-20(dd-mm-yy). For me it was also Windows Defender, the way to - hopefully temporarily- get rid of this is to add an exception for the folder your compilation output will reside in. The Microsoft website states these steps to add an exclusion:

  1. Go to Start > Settings > Update & Security > Windows Security > Virus & threat protection.
  2. Under Virus & threat protection settings, select Manage settings, and then under Exclusions, select Add or remove exclusions
0

I came across with the same problem, compiler tdm gcc v9.2.

The following compilation triggers a warning (kaspersky).

gcc temp.c -o temp.exe

The following does not

gcc -O3 temp.c -o temp.exe

Where temp.c is

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <math.h>
int main() {
    int a, b;
    scanf("%d %d", &a, &b);
    printf("mod %4d, %4d is %4d\n", a, b, a%b);
    return 0;
}

The same code with g++ passes the test with both compilations. The antivirus software does not detect the same virus elsewhere but only in temp.exe (first compilation).

-1

Since you wrote that program and you know it isn't actually a Trojan, it's obviously a false positive. You should submit the file to them at https://www.microsoft.com/wdsi/filesubmission so they can figure out why it's triggering the false positive and fix it. (If it happens with everything you compile, just sending them one will suffice.) In the meantime, you should add an exclusion to Windows Defender for the folder that you compile your executables in.

4
  • 2
    In the event that you're less than confident about the false positive, it may also be enlightening to objdump the binary and examine the assembly code produced.
    – l.k
    Jun 13 '20 at 20:30
  • @l.k I'd be exceptionally surprised if anything useful came of that. Jun 13 '20 at 20:31
  • Mainly I would expect reassurance that everything is fine.
    – l.k
    Jun 13 '20 at 20:32
  • 1
    "Since you wrote that program" Who wrote the program is irrelevant. The system is owned by third parties at this point and all executables written on it are, at this point, being infected. It doesn't matter who writes them. It's rather typical. Developer machines are not magically immune to malware. The fact that any development is being done on them means nothing. It's a typical signature of a system that is only nominally yours, but really is stealing all your data and infecting everything in sight. It's basically a situation where a figurative nuke from orbit is all that's left. Jun 14 '20 at 7:09
-2

Your system is badly infected. Since your system is basically in hands of malware writers at this point, whatever you do with your little .exe is immaterial. You don't show a minimal example. All you need is a .c file with a single line: int main() {}. You can compile it on another (uninfected) computer, copy it to yours and it'll immediately become infected. You don't have control over what gets written to that executable. It so happens that the executable is infected the moment it hits the filesystem. The malware you have does that.

Make a backup of data files that excludes anything executable, then wipe your system, reinstall Windows, install applications from credible sources (fresh downloads from trusted sites), install all Windows updates, run a virus scan of your backup using Windows built-in antimalware solution, then restore the backup. At this point your system is done, and I wouldn't trust the ability of Malwarebytes to clean it up. It's most likely to give you a false sense of security and just end up wasting lots of time, and you'll end up having to wipe everything clean anyway. So why waste time - do it right the first time.

And don't install any other antivirus or "cleaner" solution - you clearly have no feel for what's legit, and that's what got you into this trouble most likely. 99.9% of search results for malware removal and cleaner utilities are themselves either malicious malware or at least junkware that doesn't help and just extorts payments. If your online behaviors are reasonable, you won't need any solution other than what Windows includes by default.

10
  • i agree, i never trusted on using antivirus before, only this time i had found it an immediate solution to my problem. i shall have to consider your advice because i do not think i have the ability to reinstall my windows (ive messed up before). all i can do is dump my current hdd and start with a fresh new
    – tan
    Jun 14 '20 at 7:17
  • also another thing: i tried CodeBlock's MinGW compiler. i compiled the same C program and had uploaded the .exe file to virustotal. i will edit my original post and add the link. this time, ZERO engines detected it. so i think maybe there is a problem with my MinGW compiler that i had installed on my C drive. can you clarify?
    – tan
    Jun 14 '20 at 7:22
  • 2
    Your system is badly infected This is a quite strong statement without much (any?) evidence. What you describe is one possibility, and it would be bad enough that it merits attention. But it is not the only possibility. A very similar false positive raised by Defender and "detected" by several engines on virustotal happened to VC++ builds recently, reported (and confirmed) here.
    – dxiv
    Jun 14 '20 at 7:42
  • 2
    This is a joke post, right? You claim the system is badly infected but mysteriously all files and memory on the system pass the scan except for executables OP builds with one particular compiler?
    – M.M
    Jun 14 '20 at 7:44
  • 2
    i agree with dxiv and M.M i do not think my system is badly infected. there is none, if not a very small possibility of my computer being "hacked". it is either the MinGW compiler that i have installed or windows defender (or both?). i don't know what to make of any of this at this point.
    – tan
    Jun 14 '20 at 7:52

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