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I would like to reverse a String with an pointer to a function, which executes the String reverse. I have the feeling that I did not grasp the concept of using pointer to variables or functions correctly, so I would be very thankful if someone could expain me, where I am thinking wrong here:

1) Define a pointer to a function:

char *strrev(char *str)
{
  char *p1, *p2;

  if (! str || ! *str)
        return str;
  for (p1 = str, p2 = str + strlen(str) - 1; p2 > p1; ++p1, --p2)
  {
      *p1 ^= *p2;
      *p2 ^= *p1;
      *p1 ^= *p2;
   }
   return str;
}

2) Now in my main I define a pointer, which matches the function I defined above:

int main(void) {

    char (*functPtr)(char);
    functPtr = &strrev;

3) Now I define the String, which I want to reverse, define a new pointer and let the pointer point to the address space of the String.

char str[50] = "Hello, World";
char *pointer[50];
pointer[50] = &str[50];

4) Lastly I define a new String and write the result of the function, which call through the pointer, which points to the pointer to the function.

char t[50] = (*functPtr)(pointer[50]);
printf("%s\n", str);
return(0);
}

Unfortunaly I get all kinds of error message such as:

Ü1.c:29:10: error: array initializer must be an initializer list or string literal
    char t[50] = (*functPtr)(pointer[50]);
         ^
    Ü1.c:27:5: warning: array index 50 is past the end of the array (which contains 50 elements) [-Warray-bounds]
        pointer[50] = &str[50];
        ^       ~~
    Ü1.c:26:5: note: array 'pointer' declared here
        char *pointer[50];
        ^
    Ü1.c:29:30: warning: array index 50 is past the end of the array (which contains 50 elements) [-Warray-bounds]
        char t[50] = (*functPtr)(pointer[50]);
                                 ^       ~~
    Ü1.c:26:5: note: array 'pointer' declared here
        char *pointer[50];
        ^
    2 warnings and 1 error generated.
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  • 2
    char (*functPtr)(char); should be char *(*functPtr)(char *); as it takes a pointer to a char, not a char.Likewise it returns a pointer. Jun 14, 2020 at 12:32
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    char *pointer[50]; would be an array of 50 pointers, You want to say a pointer to an array of 50 chars. In C we don't say that.We just say "a pointer to a char" and don't say how many. So char *pointer; would be enough. Jun 14, 2020 at 12:37
  • char t[50] = (*functPtr)(pointer[50]); is no correct in C. You want to assign the result of funcPtr to the array t. But here you mix initialization with assignment. And you cannot "assign" an array to anor=ther array. You can only copy it. Jun 14, 2020 at 12:40
  • @PaulOgilvie : Thanks a lot for the expliation of my mistakes, I really appreciate it! I changed the last line to: printf("%s\n", (*functPtr)(pointer)); So that I dont have to copy the array. Now my code comiles, hower instead of the reverse String of "Hello World!", I am getting "��" returned in my command line. Am I now returning the pointer to the value instead of the value? Jun 14, 2020 at 12:48
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    I see you edited the first error out of your question. Do not do that! It makes your question or the comments cannot be understood anymore because what they refer to is gone. I edited the error back-in. Jun 14, 2020 at 12:56

2 Answers 2

2

1) Define a pointer to a function:

No, you did not define a pointer to function. You defined a function with the name strrev.

2) Now in my main I define a pointer, which matches the function I defined above:

int main(void) {

    char *(*functPtr)(char *);
    functPtr = &strrev;

Yes, you defined a pointer to function and initialized it with the address of the function strrev. As function designators used in expressions are implicitly converted to pointers to function then you could write

int main(void) {

    char *(*functPtr)(char *);
    functPtr = strrev;

3) Now I define the String, which I want to reverse, define a new pointer and let the pointer point to the address space of the String.

char str[50] = "Hello, World";
char *pointer[50];
pointer[50] = &str[50];

Except the definition of the character array that contains a string all other records do not make any sense. For starters the function strrev reverses a string in place. It does not create a reversed copy of the passed to it string.

If you want to declare a pointer that will get the address of the reversed string returned by the function that equal to the address of the original string then you could just write

char *pointer = functPtr( str );

4) Lastly I define a new String and write the result of the function, which call through the pointer, which points to the pointer to the function.

char t[50] = (*functPtr)(pointer[50]);
printf("%s\n", str);

You already defined a pointer that will get the value returned from the function. So there is no sense to declare one more array. Moreover arrays do not have the assignment operator. And the function reversed the original string in place. Why are you going to create one more array with the duplicate copy of the original reversed string?! This entirely does not make a sense.

Your program can look the following way

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

char * strrev( char *s )
{
    size_t n = strlen( s );

    if ( n )
    {
        for ( char *first = s, *last = s + n; first < --last; ++first )
        {
            char c = *first;
            *first = *last;
            *last = c;
        }
    }

    return s;
}

int main(void) 
{
    char * ( *fp )( char * ) = strrev;

    char s[] = "Hello, World";

    puts( s );
    puts( fp( s ) );

    return 0;
}

The program output is

Hello, World
dlroW ,olleH

If you initially wanted that the function would not reverse the original string but make a reversed copy of the original string then in this case indeed there is a sense to define one additional character array that will get the reversed copy of the original string.

In this case the program can look like.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

char *reverse_copy( char *s1, const char *s2 )
{
    *( s1 += strlen( s2 ) ) = '\0';

    while (*s2)
    {
        *--s1 = *s2++;
    }

    return s1;
}

int main(void) 
{
    char * ( *fp )( char *, const char * ) = reverse_copy;

    char s[] = "Hello, World";
    char t[sizeof( s )];
    puts( s );
    puts( fp( t, s ) );

    return 0;
}

The program output is

Hello, World
dlroW ,olleH

Now the original character array s was not changed while the array t got the reversed copy of the original string stored in the array s.

2

I summarize my comments in this answer, as it gives more space for details of the comments.

char (*functPtr)(char); should be char *(*functPtr)(char *); as it takes a pointer to a char, not a char. Likewise it returns a pointer.

char *pointer[50]; would be an array of 50 pointers, You want to say "a pointer to an array of 50 chars". In C we don't say that. We just say "a pointer to a char" and don't say how many. So char *pointer; would be enough.

char t[50] = (*functPtr)(pointer[50]); is not correct in C.

You want to assign the result of funcPtr to the array t. But here you mix initialization with assignment. char t[50]; declares an array of 50 chars. You can initialize it by giving it a value, for example char t[50] = "Hello World"; which will have the compiler copy "Hello World" to the array.

But you try to assign the function pointer to the array. You probably intend to put the result of the function into the array.

Note also that you cannot "assign" an array to another array. You can only copy it.

So the correct code would be:

char *(*functPtr)(char *);
functPtr = &strrev;

char str[50] = "Hello, World";

char t[50];
char *s= funcPtr(str);  // call the function and save the returned pointer
strcpy(t, s);           // now copy the result to your array.
printf("%s\n", t);      // and print it

Note: char str[50] = "Hello, World"; is correct and, just so you'll know, char *str = "Hello, World"; is wrong. Why? Because the second str will point to read-only memory (a "string literal") and any attempt to modify it would abort the program. But here you did it right.

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  • Thanks a lot for the summary, the code works now! Could you please quickly explain me, why I can just use char str[50] = "Hello World" Instead of creating a pointer, which points to the value and then put that pointer into the function? I thought I have to pass a pointer to the function has it requests a (char *). Jun 14, 2020 at 12:57
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    Sorry for my late reply. In C, when you mention the name of an array, it "decays" to the address of its first member. in other words, mentioning the array name results in using the pointer to the array. So with char *s= funcPtr(str); you already pass it a pointer to str. Jun 14, 2020 at 14:19

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