37

By default, during debugging in IPython, ipdb shows one line above and one line below the current position in code.

Is there an easy way to make the area shown a bit bigger? I'd think it would be configurable, but haven't been able to find it.

40

You can type l in ipdb to show a few more lines of the current context

and you can keep hitting l and it continue revealing more lines from the file

If you want to show more lines of context around the current line you can type l to get the current line. And then type l curr_line - 10, curr_line + 10. Say I was on line 50 and I wanted to see the surrounding 20 lines. I would type: l 40,60 to see more.

As noted by @jrieke in a comment, you can also hit ll to get a bigger chunk of context. One nice thing about ll is it will print all the way back from the start of the current method (whereas consecutive ls reveal further lines below your breakpoint).

  • 2
    Adding to this: You can also enter ll to get more lines at once. – jrieke Jul 24 '17 at 1:02
  • 1
    I think this answer should be the accepted one. – stefanfoulis Aug 9 '17 at 9:12
  • The question asks for this to be done by default, not through additional user action. – fastmultiplication Oct 10 '17 at 20:53
16

You can get more context by doing:

ipdb.set_trace(context=21)

(there's a bug introduced in 0.10.0 that breaks this, but it should be fixed soon)

Permanent context size

To permanently set context size, find the installation directory by doing

python -c 'import ipdb; print(ipdb)'

which will show you a __init__.py file. Open that file and find the line (which may also be found in IPDB's __main__.py:

def set_trace(frame=None, context=3):

change the 3 to however many context lines you want.

  • ipdb v0.10.2 hasn't been released yet and I cannot find anything related to IPDB_CONTEXT_SIZE anywhere, not even on their github repository. – gnebehay Sep 5 '16 at 9:00
  • @gnebehay, you're right, thanks. I've updated my answer. – Garrett Sep 5 '16 at 20:45
  • 1
    This works for python3 too. – fastmultiplication Feb 17 at 0:21
12

OK, I found the place in the IPython source code to do this. In my installation it's at

.../python2.7/site-packages/ipython-0.10.2-py2.7.egg/IPython/Debugger.py:327:

Change this:

def print_stack_entry(self,frame_lineno,prompt_prefix='\n-> ',
                      context = 3):

to

def print_stack_entry(self,frame_lineno,prompt_prefix='\n-> ',
                      context = 11):

It is awesome!

For IPython 4.0.1, in debugger.py just add this:

class Pdb(OldPdb):
  """Modified Pdb class, does not load readline."""

  def __init__(self,color_scheme='NoColor',completekey=None,
               stdin=None, stdout=None, context=None):
      context=20
  • 2
    I found mine in a different file on Ubuntu 12.04 - /usr/lib/python2.7/dist-packages/IPython/core/debugger.py – user1953384 Dec 20 '13 at 20:00
  • 10
    editing bowels of dependency package with bare hands not the way you usually want to configure something.. – Dmitry Nazarov Aug 21 '15 at 12:34
1

As a quick complement to https://stackoverflow.com/a/35883288/895245 this is the one liner that you generally want to add to the code you want to debug:

__import__('ipdb').set_trace(context=21)

You likely want to add a shortcut for that from your editor, e.g. for Vim snipmat I have:

snippet ipd
    __import__('ipdb').set_trace(context=21)

so I can type just ipd<tab> and it expands to the breakpoint. Then removing it is easy with dd since everything is contained in a single line.

0

If you want to stop execution in a running system, as others said, use:

ipdb.set_trace(context=number_of_lines)

For running some function or an object's method modifying this context lines is a little bit tricky. The only way I found was:

ipdb.__main__._init_pdb(context=number_of_lines).runcall(callable, *args, **kwargs)

In case it serves someone.

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