35

Recently, our professor has requested that we use two char variables (day) to receive the input from the user.

The code below works fine as a check to ensure that either Mo, Tu, We, Th, Fr, Sa, Su are the only two characters which are entered together as a pair. If anything else is received as input, it'll loop and ask the user for valid input.

The input should be case-insensitive, meaning that, for example, "mO" and "tu" are acceptable. It seems like there is a lot of repetition that is happening. Is there a way to clean this up?

cout << "Please enter the day of the week did you made the long distance call (Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa Su): ";
cin >> dayOne >> dayTwo;

while ((dayOne != 'M' && dayOne != 'm' || dayTwo != 'O' && dayTwo != 'o') &&
       (dayOne != 'T' && dayOne != 't' || dayTwo != 'U' && dayTwo != 'u') &&
       (dayOne != 'W' && dayOne != 'w' || dayTwo != 'e' && dayTwo != 'E') &&
       (dayOne != 'T' && dayOne != 't' || dayOne != 'H' && dayTwo != 'h') &&
       (dayOne != 'F' && dayOne != 'f' || dayTwo != 'R' && dayTwo != 'r') &&
       (dayOne != 'S' && dayOne != 's' || dayTwo != 'A' && dayTwo != 'a') &&
       (dayOne != 'S' && dayOne != 's' || dayTwo != 'U' && dayTwo != 'u'))
{
    cin.clear();
    cin.ignore(std::numeric_limits<std::streamsize>::max(), '\n');
    cout << endl << "You have entered an invalid day. Please re-enter a day in the correct format (Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa Su): ";
    cin >> dayOne >> dayTwo;
}
  • 2
    You can convert to lower or upper case and compare against that, reducing the number of checks by two. You can use switch statements, perhaps nested. You could move to using an actual std::string and using operator==. And so on, and so forth. – underscore_d Jun 16 at 15:19
  • 3
    @underscore_d Yeah tell me about it. The prof doesn't even come up with the excercises. He takes them from the textbook. It's extremely frustrating for those who actually wish to learn something...is there any places which you could recommend excercises that might challenge on a bit more? – mynameisdlo Jun 16 at 15:46
  • 2
    hackerrank.com/domains/cpp ? :) – crsn Jun 16 at 16:00
  • 2
    Thanks @crsn I will give that a shot! – mynameisdlo Jun 16 at 16:02
  • 2
    See std::toupper and std::tolower to convert to all uppercase or all lowercase to reduce the number of comparisons. – Thomas Matthews Jun 16 at 16:16
33
2

You could write a fold-expression that compares 2 characters to a string:

template<typename ...Days>
bool any_of(char a, char b, Days ...days)
{
    return (... || (a == days[0] && b == days[1]));
}

and then use it like this:

while (! any_of(std::tolower(dayOne), std::tolower(dayTwo), "mo", "tu", "we", "th", "fr", "sa", "su"))
    // keep asking for input

Here's a demo.

This should satisfy the requirement of using 2 char inputs.

| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    Not sure what a fold expression is, but I'm definitely open to doing some research. Thank you opening the doors to something new for me. – mynameisdlo Jun 16 at 15:35
  • 13
    This a very elegant solution however if I gave a new programmer an assignment and they came back with a C++ fold expression, I would assume they copied the code from somewhere. Generally the point of these sorts of assignments is to get an understanding of basic control flow. – mascoj Jun 17 at 14:06
  • 5
    @mascoj True, but in that case, I don't think this is a good assignment. The question should be such that basic control flow is the best solution, if that's the concept that the student should be learning. At least, this way the student can learn something new, that is also a better way to solve the given problem :) – cigien Jun 17 at 14:13
  • 1
    @mascoj I'd say you should be glad your assignments prompt students to bountiful googling. They might've copied it today, but they'll know it tomorrow. – Daniel B Jun 18 at 5:19
18
0

You typically use tolower or toupper to convert your char variable to the correct case first. I like using tolower - it looks marginally better.

dayOne = tolower(dayOne);
dayTwo = tolower(dayTwo);

while (
    (dayOne != 'm' || dayTwo != 'o') &&
    (dayOne != 't' || dayTwo != 'u') &&
    (dayOne != 'w' || dayTwo != 'e') &&
    (dayOne != 't' || dayTwo != 'h') &&
    (dayOne != 'f' || dayTwo != 'r') &&
    (dayOne != 's' || dayTwo != 'a') &&
    (dayOne != 's' || dayTwo != 'u'))
{
    ...
}

You can further change it by using memcmp to compare both characters at once, but I am not sure it would simplify the code.

| improve this answer | |
  • 3
    Unless you've assembled the two characters into a string, using memcmp will invoke undefined behavior, and if you've assembled them into a string, you'd be better off doing string comparisons. – Mark Jun 17 at 23:34
  • 1
    @Mark: memcmp is simpler than strcmp - it doesn't have to check for terminating 0 bytes in both strings, it can just compare a fixed number of bytes. (Especially good when that number is a compile-time constant). In this case you'd use it by doing char day[] = {dayOne, dayTwo}; (note that this isn't a C string, there's no 0 terminator). For 2 byte compares in particular, you can expect a compiler to make this efficient by having the 2 bytes of string data in a register and doing integer comparisons. e.g. in NASM syntax, cmp eax, "mo" / je match. – Peter Cordes Jun 18 at 13:58
  • @PeterCordes, true, you don't need the terminating null to use memcmp. But you still need to assemble them into a single unit -- memcmp(&dayOne, "mo", 2) is undefined behavior. – Mark Jun 18 at 22:46
  • @Mark: yes, of course it is, that's why I didn't say to do that. Another thing you could do is int bytes = dayOne | (dayTwo << 8), then you could even switch on that integer value, using cases like case 'm' | ('o'<<8):. (The transform from 2 chars to an int could be wrapped in a macro or function). Likely a sequence of memcmp will compile similarly to that switch. (This is endian agnostic since I'm just shifting both compare operands, and I didn't need casting to uint32_t because << promotes the left side to int if it's narrower, and int is wide enough for 2 ASCII chars.) – Peter Cordes Jun 18 at 23:04
  • Oh, @Harjit Singh already had this idea and posted it as an answer. – Peter Cordes Jun 18 at 23:07
11
2

Another approach that might be worth mention is to organize your data, so that you can use std functions against it (std::find)

// Example program
#include <algorithm>
#include <string>
#include <vector>
#include <iostream>

int main()
{
    const std::vector<std::string> days = {
        "mo", "tu", "we", "th", "fr", "sa", "su"
    };

    bool found = false;

    while (found == false) {
        char dayOne, dayTwo;
        std::cout << "Please enter the first letter of the day" << std::endl;
        std::cin >> dayOne;
        std::cout << "Please enter the second letter of the day" << std::endl;
        std::cin >> dayTwo;

        std::string fullDay;
        fullDay += std::tolower(dayOne);
        fullDay += std::tolower(dayTwo);

        found = std::find(days.begin(), days.end(), fullDay) != days.end();
        std::cout << (found ? "correct day " : "invalid day, please try again ")
                  << fullDay
                  << std::endl;
    }
}

run it here

| improve this answer | |
  • 3
    Appreciate the response, but we have not covered vectors yet in the course unfortunately. However, I keep on seeing vectors everytime I google something CPP related so I will start looking up the use for them! – mynameisdlo Jun 16 at 16:53
  • 2
    Dynamically allocated std::vector is overkill for this situation since you already know the size in advance and don't add any more items to it. – hoz Jun 18 at 9:28
  • 1
    @hoz true, I can provide an optimized version, but for the purpose of the example (showing std containers), should be enough – crsn Jun 18 at 11:31
7
0

How about

switch (256 * tolower(dayOne) + tolower(dayTwo))
{
    case 256 * 'm' + 'o':
        // Monday
    case 256 * 't' + 'u':
        // Tuesday
}

and so on?

| improve this answer | |
  • 4
    For anyone wondering how this works, what it does is convert each two-char string into a single int, using the underlying ASCII representations; the first character is shifted left 8 spaces and the second left unshifted. This effectively converts the strings into ints, allowing them to be used in a switch statement. – Justin Time - Reinstate Monica Jun 17 at 2:56
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    Why are you multiplying by 256? This should not be a hard-coded literal. For readability and self-documenting code, you should define it as a symbolic constant. (Also...assuming ASCII is non-portable and should probably be avoided, especially for someone learning to program.) – Cody Gray Jun 18 at 4:38
  • @CodyGray - this doesn't appear to assume ASCII though, it should still work with EBCDIC. It does assume 8-bit char (so maybe shifting left by CHAR_BIT would be better, though watch out for systems where char is signed), though whether that's really of relevance to someone learning programming today rather than in the 1980s is another matter. – antispinwards Jun 18 at 8:41
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    @JustinTime-ReinstateMonica or you could say it is just dayOne << 8 | dayTwo :] – PTwr Jun 18 at 20:13
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    @PeterCordes - yeah, that's the kind of thing that led me to start using Rust. I'd rather fight the borrow checker than the insane integer rules in C/C++. – antispinwards Jun 19 at 9:02
4
1

Don't know if you're using/allowed regexes, but I'd solve it like this:

bool isDayOfTheWeek(char a, char b)
{
    std::string day({a, b});
    std::regex pattern("Mo|Tu|We|Th|Fr|Sa|Su", std::regex_constants::icase);
    return std::regex_search(day, pattern);
}

Then simply:

cout << "Please enter the day of the week did you made the long distance call (Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa Su): ";
cin >> dayOne >> dayTwo;

while (!isDayOfTheWeek(dayOne, dayTwo))
{
    cin.clear();
    cin.ignore(std::numeric_limits<std::streamsize>::max(), '\n');
    cout << endl << "You have entered an invalid day. Please re-enter a day in the correct format (Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa Su): ";
    cin >> dayOne >> dayTwo;
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 9
    Put away that bazooka; this is only a fly! – Cody Gray Jun 18 at 4:33
  • 1
    @CodyGray Yeah, but that fly isn't going to be bothering anyone any more! :D – Paul Evans Jun 18 at 9:55
  • 3
    @PaulEvans I actually like it, as I find it very readable. I am not sure the professor wanted this though! :) – crsn Jun 18 at 11:56
  • All this feedback has been filled with lots of good info that will require me to reserach on my own. Super appreciative of all the feedback for a new programmer like myself! A lot of it is new to me which I like so I can look up on my own time. – mynameisdlo Jun 18 at 16:25
2
0

I would first convert inputs to lowercase, which cuts on the amount of possible combinations. Then I would solve it with a single if-statement per day:

// returns 0-6 for valid days, -1 for invalid ones
int dayOfWeek(char a, char b) {
    a = tolower(a); // requires #include <cctype>
    b = tolower(b);
    if (a == 'm' && b == 'o') return 0;
    // 5 more here
    if (a == 's' && b == 'u') return 6;
    return -1;      // date was invalid
}

And then I would use it as @PaulEvans suggested:

cout << "Please enter the day of the week did you made the long distance call (Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa Su): ";
cin >> dayOne >> dayTwo;

int day = -1;

while ((day = dayOfWeek(dayOne, dayTwo)) == -1)
{
    cin.clear();
    cin.ignore(std::numeric_limits<std::streamsize>::max(), '\n');
    cout << endl << "You have entered an invalid day. Please re-enter a day in the correct format (Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa Su): ";
    cin >> dayOne >> dayTwo;
}

// day is 0 for monday, ... 6 for sunday
| improve this answer | |

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