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RFC 7230 §4.1 defined "chunk extensions", additional key-value pairs that can be sent along with chunk in an HTTP message encoded with Transfer-Encoding: chunked:

The chunked encoding allows each chunk to include zero or more chunk extensions, immediately following the chunk-size, for the sake of supplying per-chunk metadata (such as a signature or hash), mid-message control information, or randomization of message body size.

HTTP/2 claims,

HTTP/2 is intended to be as compatible as possible with current uses of HTTP. This means that, from the application perspective, the features of the protocol are largely unchanged. To achieve this, all request and response semantics are preserved, although the syntax of conveying those semantics has changed.

In HTTP/2, the DATA frames are used to carry data, in chunks, instead of the chunked Transfer-Encoding:

HTTP/2 uses DATA frames to carry message payloads. The "chunked" transfer encoding defined in Section 4.1 of [RFC7230] MUST NOT be used in HTTP/2.

but, AFAICT, DATA frames offer no support for chunk extensions, only an optional padding.

In particular, how is an HTTP/1.1 to HTTP/2 proxy, receiving a request containing chunks bearing well-formed chunk-extensions supposed to translate those chunks to HTTP/2?

3 Answers 3

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In https://greenbytes.de/tech/webdav/rfc7540.html#rfc.section.8.1.p.4:

HTTP/2 uses DATA frames to carry message payloads. The chunked transfer encoding defined in Section 4.1 of [RFC7230] MUST NOT be used in HTTP/2.

So no chunked encoding, thus no chunked extensions.

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  • Do you know of any reference or material towards the second part — what is a proxy supposed to do, if presented with chunked extensions?
    – Thanatos
    Jun 19, 2020 at 2:14
  • Out of curiosity: are you aware of any use of chunk extensions in the wild? In any case, there seem to be only two ways to deal with this: fail the request, or ignore the extension. Jun 19, 2020 at 9:43
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    No, merely teetering between "disavow" / not supporting it, or trying to support it. From an API perspective, it's problematic: it's much cleaner to provide a simple stream of bytes, which is likely why, AFAIK, nothing supports it. But of course, if nobody implements a thing, nothing will ever make use of it, either. It is interesting to me, and it seems like an error, that HTTP/2 does not at least mention it; I would have expected to have seen it noted as deprecated, and removed in HTTP/2. That seems to be the de facto state, at any rate.
    – Thanatos
    Jun 21, 2020 at 2:56
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    My research also came across github.com/httpwg/http-core/issues/313 "Mid-stream trailers". Some of the use-cases, "in-band signaling support such as load reporting, app-level flow-control, authn update etc" sound very much like chunk extensions. (Intriguingly, trailers survive in HTTP/2, despite the same lack of real world use — though there are good uses it that I have hit in the wild which I wish had used trailers.) (my decision here, I think, will be no support, since it is both problematic and unused in the wild, and gone in HTTP/2…)
    – Thanatos
    Jun 21, 2020 at 2:57
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In particular, how is an HTTP/1.1 to HTTP/2 proxy, receiving a request containing chunks bearing well-formed chunk-extensions supposed to translate those chunks to HTTP/2?

RFC 7230 §4.1.1 states:

A recipient MUST ignore unrecognized chunk extensions.

You'll have difficulty recognizing any chunk extensions, since none have ever been defined that I can tell.

Transfer-Encoding is a hop-by-hop header, so you can compliantly discard any chunk extensions you receive and generate DATA frames from the chunked data.

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In HTTP/2, the DATA frames are used to carry data, in chunks, instead of the chunked Transfer-Encoding

Simply put, each DATA frame is a chunk. There's no need to use the HTTP/1.1 chunked encoding, because HTTP/2 data frames provide the same set of features.

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