7

Every now and then I find myself needing to write conditionals with two or three branches: at minimum, one for when all of two or more variables are defined and one for when any or none of those are defined. Sometimes that last branch needs to be two separate branches. What are some short and sweet ways of writing this?

10
1

with, without, and orwith are conditionals that work similarly to if, unless, and elsif, except they check for the definedness of their argument instead of their truthiness. Junctions get threaded when used in combination with these, so a conditional like that can be written like this:

my Str $foo = '' if 2.rand.floor;
my Str $bar = '' if 2.rand.floor;
with $foo & $bar {
    say 'yes';
} orwith $foo | $bar {
    say 'maybe';
} else {
    say 'no';
}

Or for an arbitrary number of variables:

my Str @strings = do 2.rand.floor ?? '' !! Nil for ^3;
with all @strings {
    say 'yes';
} orwith any @strings {
    say 'maybe';
} else {
    say 'no';
}
| improve this answer | |
  • hi @kaiepi - please can you explain what is the :_ for in the my Str:_ ... statements?? – p6steve Jun 18 at 19:50
  • hi @kaiepi - I am worried that the reputation of perl as line noise is continuing with perl6 - so I propose to use the default ‘Str’ which is (i) something that works with less noise and (ii) someone thought about and defined, unless I misunderstand and there is some value in the ‘:_’ – p6steve Jul 5 at 21:27
  • In my own code, I prefer to be explicit with type smileys, but I can see why people don't like :_. I'll edit it out. – Kaiepi 24 mins ago
5
0

with et al are great, and I might write a chained with statement, especially if the matching of particular variable combinations was ad hoc or I thought could become so given expected evolution of the code.

But given your literal question, and the scenario you have in your answer, I'd much more likely go with given/when instead:

my ($foo, $bar, $baz) = (Mu, 42).pick xx Inf;

given $foo, $bar, $baz {
  when .all.defined { say 'yes'   }
  when .any.defined { say 'maybe' }
  default           { say 'no'    }
}
| improve this answer | |
  • What is the point of usingwhen / default here, if you really mean if / elsif / else ? – Elizabeth Mattijsen Jun 18 at 18:58
  • 1
    @ElizabethMattijsen ➊ I prefer how it reads. One keyword rather than three (default is optional outside exception handlers). ➋ when's smart without $_ ~~. That doesn't matter until it does, but when it does, it does. ➌ when supports proceed / succeed (statement modifier when too). Again, this doesn't matter until it does, but if doesn't, period. ➍ Each time I refactored a set topic / if / elsif / else chain to accommodate ➋ or ➌ I thought about ➊ and the famous yagni's less well known annoying identical twin (you are gonna need it). ➎ I use if if speed matters... – raiph Jun 18 at 21:15
4
0

You could create a combined value and use a signature as a when conditional.

( :(…) is the syntax for a Signature literal. )

given ($foo,$bar,$baz) {
   when :( Any:D, Any:D, Any:D ) { 'all defined' }
   when :( Any:D, Any:D, Any:U ) { '$baz undefined' }
   when :( Any:D, Any:_, Any:D ) { '$bar not checked' }

   default { … }
}

You could create lexical constants to make it shorter.

my constant D = Any:D; # defined
my constant U = Any:U; # undefined
my constant _ = Any:_; # either

given ($foo,$bar,$baz) {
   when :(D,D,D) { 'all defined' }
   when :(D,D,U) { '$baz undefined' }
   when :(D,_,D) { '$bar not checked' }

   default { … }
}

Or if you want it to be more visual:

my constant term:<▣> = Any:D; # defined
my constant term:<□> = Any:U; # undefined
my constant term:<▨> = Any:_; # either

given ($foo,$bar,$baz) {
   when :(▣,▣,▣) { 'all defined' }
   when :(▣,▣,□) { '$baz undefined' }
   when :(▣,▨,▣) { '$bar not checked' }

   default { … }
}

You could create a subroutine that gives the Signature to use instead.

## something like this should work
## but something is weird with the returns constraint
#sub prefix:<d> ( $_ ) {
#  my constant %lookup = (
#    '▣' => Parameter.new( type => Any:D ),
#    '□' => Parameter.new( type => Any:U ),
#    '▨' => Parameter.new( type => Any:_ ),
#  );
#  Signature.new: params => %lookup{.comb}
#}

sub prefix:<d> ( $_ ) {
  my constant %lookup = (
    '▣' => 'Any:D',
    '□' => 'Any:U',
    '▨' => 'Any:_',
  );
  use MONKEY-SEE-NO-EVAL;
  EVAL ":(%lookup{.comb}.join(","))"
}

given ($foo,$bar,$baz) {
   when d'▣▣▣' { 'all defined' }
   when d'▣▣□' { '$baz undefined' }
   when d'▣▨▣' { '$bar not checked' }

   default { … }
}
| improve this answer | |

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